Jump to content

Stargazers Lounge Uses Cookies

Like most websites, SGL uses cookies in order to deliver a secure, personalised service, to provide social media functions and to analyse our traffic. Continued use of SGL indicates your acceptance of our cookie policy.

stargazine_ep34_banner.thumb.jpg.28dd32d9305c7de9b6591e6bf6600b27.jpg

Sign in to follow this  
ardev

Sirius Star

Recommended Posts

 What would be the best way to see star sirius through 70mm telescope. it appear to be blur image, change in colour & the light from the star disappear sometimes.

Please guide.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The views you get through the scope are often distorted by atmospheric conditions.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You won't ever see Sirius as anything more than a point of light. If you are expecting to see a full disc (as some new observers often do), that just wont happen.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sirius is what I cal a 'sparkler.' It's so bright that, even under the best of 'seeing' conditions, it flashes many colours in the sky - and through a telescope. And a telescope doesn't make stars more than a point of light. They are to far away to appear as a disk - unlike planets in our solar-system.

Dave

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cant remember the last time i saw Sirius. But the description of it is spot on. Thats all it ever appeared to be to me.

Edited by LukeSkywatcher

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As others have said, a star when in focus should be a point of light. Sirius due to its brightness and its low altitude in the sky is always at the mercy of the atmospheric conditions and therefore tends to twinkle much more than other stars. It's certainly a favourite of mine.

Edited by HowardHopkinson

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sirius is always twinkly and wobbly for northern observers due to its low altitude. For those with larger scope it makes the pup (Sirius B ) a very tough target.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sirius altitude shouldnt be a problem when observing from Malaysia?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Was your telescope cooled down? That helps for having clear images. And it helps to wait until the object you want to look at is high up in the sky. The rest differs with the weather and seeing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
29 minutes ago, HowardHopkinson said:

Oops! I didn't spot the OP was in Malaysia. Apologies.

Me neither.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.