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Having only just started, I soon enough came across the fact that the two hemispheres have different astronomical features. This seems pretty obvious now but something I didnt really consider. Im very interested to know what are some of the main features that are only observable for each hemisphere? For example what delights would an australian observer see that a brit couldnt? And vice versa. Thanks. 

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When I spent a period of time in the south, the Milky Way was a lot more impressive than from the UK, with the area round Scorpius and Sagittarius getting much higher in the sky. It only scrapes the horizon here in the UK. The Large Magellanic Cloud was impressive to the naked eye. I'd love to see it again. The Southern Cross (as seen on the flags of various southern nations) was a nice companion in the sky, and nearby Alpha Centauri, one of our closest stars beyond the sun. I recall seeing Orion (upside down) as one of the few familiar sights in the sky. There was a recent thread on here about the challenges of seeing the Andromeda Galexy from the south, which is a terrific sight from the UK.

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Thats a very interesting reply, I will try and search for some photos of the southern cross and also research the Magenallic cloud which I feel sure could be what Ive seen on dark sky photos and didnt know what it was. Thanks, adam

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You could have a look in Stellarium and view the shy from any location down South, even the pole if you like!

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Unfortunately I dont have a computer now, great idea though! Wouldve been perfect

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Southern Hemisphere observers have the two brightest clusters in the night sky.

47 Tucanae/NGC104/c106 is a mag 4.0, 30' dia glob just off the side of the Small Magellanic Cloud. It has a very dense core.

Omega Centauri/NGC5139/C80 is a mag 3.7 36.3' dia in the southern constellation Centaurus. Under dark skies it's a naked eye object.

It's also home to the biggest (AFAIK) nebula in the night sky, The Eta Carina Nebula. At 2°x2°, it's a struggle to fit in an eyepiece. At mag 3.0 it too can be seen with the naked eye.

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Thanks for the heads up i haven't had much luck down here  it has been extremely overcast for weeks and doesn't seem much better for the next week.

very unusual for this time of year, nice to get some content for the Southern Hemisphere.

Mick

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First time I viewed the Southern Sky was years ago in Argentina, in the foothills of the Andes mountain range, visiting some caves with prehistoric rock paintings. No scope, no binos, just me, a sleeping bag, and a horse. About 15 miles from a small farm with no electricity and 50 miles from a small town. No Moon to speak of. The Milky Way gave me a thrill I can remember perfectly, almost a spiritual experience! Never got that in Europe, sadly.

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Beaner has already covered some of the biggest and best down south, 47 Tucanae and Omega Cenauri are quite spectacular. The large and small Meganallic clouds are neighbouring galaxies, and i get a bit gobsmacked every time i look at the Tarantula Neb in the LMC, just knowing what i am looking at. We also have a number of brilliant clusters which i dont think can be seen up north.

Cheers

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I lived inorth of Perth, WA, for 5 years and the skies were impressive. While many of the constellations are not huge or bright there are plenty of DSO's and good clusters.

LMC and SMC on a dark sky are knockout, the Coalsack Nebula next the the Southern Cross is an interesting one. Being able to see the whole of Scorpio rivaled views of Orion.

 

 

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21 hours ago, Adamchiv said:

Unfortunately I dont have a computer now, great idea though! Wouldve been perfect

There are a few star map applications for iOS and Android too if they are of any more use. I use Sky Safari which is excellent, but there are plenty of reasonable (but a bit more basic) free alternatives.

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Not familiar with the southern hemisphere but i do know that the LMC and SMC are 2 of the most obvious differences. Also objects that are high in the sky for us in the northern hemisphere skirt around the horizon below the equator and visa versa (as mentioned above). Orion to southern observers looks upside down when compared to us in the northern hem. The Moon even looks upside down.

Its all relative.

Down in the southern hem...........they dont have a pole star to align their scopes with. I think they use "Crux", the southern cross to align their scopes with or a star close by which is pretty stable as a southern pole star.

Edited by LukeSkywatcher

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2 hours ago, LukeSkywatcher said:

or a star close by which is pretty stable as a southern pole star.

That would be the barely visible Sigma Octantis.

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