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Avdhoeven

M81/82 Ultra deep field...

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This image is a continuation of an image I made in 2014 of the M81/82 galaxy group. I made the images and found signals of integrated flux nebula surrounding the galaxies. Soon after that I got in touch with Neil Fleming who had a splendid image of the IFN in this region on his website and a fellow astrophotographer, Michael Van Doorn, who had imaged the galaxies using his hyperstar setup.

We decided to combine the data and create a deep field of this region. The lower magnitude visible is around mag. +24 in this image!
Because of the long period of bad weather I decided to do some reprocessing on previously made images and decided to see if I could get even more out of this image.

I think the result is astonishing. As far as I have found this is the deepest image of this region that I could find on the internet. The IFN really stands out very clearly and it's nice to see details like Arp's loop at M81 really jumping out to the image....

Image details are visible in the image.

24562871296_797d27265e_b.jpg
M81/82 Ultra deep field :) by Andre van der Hoeven, on Flickr

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I'm staggered at the detail in this image- congratulations!  Despite having a degreee in this astronomy lark, I had never heard of an integrated flux nebula - fascinating.

Just imagine if we could capture the whole sky with that sort of resolution!

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Well 34 hours of Hyperstar is an astonishing amount of light capture. I have never seen those subjects surrounded by so much dust not even in Hubbles images i dont think. Incredible capture and nicely done.

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Absolutely magnificent image, I can't believe how much IFN you've pulled out of the darkness, am I right in thinking you bagged a supernova in this image too? 

Edited by Maximidius

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Woah! Absolutely stunning. The best I've seen for this region by a long way.

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Truly excellent Andre, very deep and the resolution in the starburst really does it for me. Well done all of you.

Callum

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That is indeed very deep but I think I'm even more impressed by the resolution you've a achieved from quite modest focal lengths.

In fact you've inspried me to take another look at my own IFN effort with the message 'must try harder' ringing in my ears!

Olly

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That picture is beautiful. I can't stop looking at it. May I ask what telescope and equipment are you using? I can only hope to be half that good. 

Bryan

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What a great project, I love this image. I was imaging this area last week doing 12 20minute lum subs and I can only just see the slightest hint of arps loop and thats maybe because I know its there!

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That is cracking and a superb result. I remember trying to do this from my not so bad light polluted garden for 16 hours and didn't get 1/2 this amount of flux.

Top drawer and great processing to drag out the flux.

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