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Heimdall

First camera? Canon 1200d or? AP books?

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Hi guys, haven't been on here for a while because it hasn't stopped raining since may. Anyway, I've been thinking about buying a Canon 1200d mainly because of the price and reviews are very good. To start with Id like to use it for wide field shots like the milky way, Andromeda ect and the moon just to get to grips with it. I have a SW explorer 130 on eq2 mount and SW heritage 76 which I'd like to attach it to in time. Realistically it will be used for daytime as much as AP if not more. Was wondering if anyone could suggest an alternative brand/model I should consider before I buy? Ive seen a few pics on here using the 1200d so I got a rough idea of what to expect. Also any suggestions on AP books that are there out there would be appreciated. Any opinions, suggestions or advice would be greatly appreciated, thanks in advance.

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The 1200D is a great camera, if you don't mod it, you can use it for normal day time photography, but it will be severely limited to imaging in HAlpha. Apparently you can get a clip in filter for a modded camera and have the best of both worlds, but looking around ebay DSLRs like a 40D are very cheap, so I have my 7D for regular photography and a modded 40D for my astro imaging.

As well as "Making Every Photon Count" mentioned above, have a look at "Digital SLR Astrphotography".

post-43662-0-72985300-1451928519.jpg

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The 1200D is a great camera, if you don't mod it, you can use it for normal day time photography, but it will be severely limited to imaging in HAlpha. Apparently you can get a clip in filter for a modded camera and have the best of both worlds, but looking around ebay DSLRs like a 40D are very cheap, so I have my 7D for regular photography and a modded 40D for my astro imaging.

As well as "Making Every Photon Count" mentioned above, have a look at "Digital SLR Astrphotography".

Is it just me that finds it amusing that a book about DSLR Astro imaging has a picture on the front cover with the core of M42 blown out [emoji1] Edited by knobby
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Personally i use a 60D but the former 550D also has the benefit of a 640x480 crop straight from the sensor.

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Is it just me that finds it amusing that a book about DSLR Astro imaging has a picture on the front cover with the core of M42 blown out [emoji1]

Because that's what happens with a DSLR :-P

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Thats what happens when you overexpose the core - whether its a DSLR or a CCD !  Its almost impossible to avoid without taking long subs for the faint parts and short subs for the core then layering them but I agree its a poor choice for a book on the subject.

Unless its the before in the before and after - maybe the back cover has a stupendous image !

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Be aware that you may not be able to bring your camera to prime focus on either of your scopes as they are not designed for that.

It may be possible using a Barlow lens but then the increased effective focal length of the scope will make it very hard to track on an eq2.

Not impossible just difficult.

The idea of starting with wide field shots is a good one, read up on what lenses are good for AP, there are some cheapish prime lenses that will work really well. Make sure you get an intervalometer for the camera too.

+1 for Making Every Photon Count.

/Dan

Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

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Thanks guys, Ive ordered a copy of making every photon count :D il wait a bit before buying the camera just to do a little ebit more research.

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Be aware that you may not be able to bring your camera to prime focus on either of your scopes as they are not designed for that.

It may be possible using a Barlow lens but then the increased effective focal length of the scope will make it very hard to track on an eq2.

Not impossible just difficult.

The idea of starting with wide field shots is a good one, read up on what lenses are good for AP, there are some cheapish prime lenses that will work really well. Make sure you get an intervalometer for the camera too.

+1 for Making Every Photon Count.

/Dan

Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

Thanks Dan, Is it because they are reflector scopes? The intervalometer is to take the shot without touching the camera to stop vibration?  

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Is it just me that finds it amusing that a book about DSLR Astro imaging has a picture on the front cover with the core of M42 blown out [emoji1]

demonstrates the sensitivity of DSLRs :-/

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Because that's what happens with a DSLR :-P

Or poor processing.....

post-43662-0-51695400-1452026325.jpg

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Thats what happens when you overexpose the core - whether its a DSLR or a CCD !  Its almost impossible to avoid without taking long subs for the faint parts and short subs for the core then layering them but I agree its a poor choice for a book on the subject.

Unless its the before in the before and after - maybe the back cover has a stupendous image !

No it doesn't have a stupendous image on the back.. but don't judge a book by the cover... HAAA

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You guys lost me a bit but I see what you mean now, bit of a poor choice for a cover photo I suppose but the book does have good reviews.

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Thanks Dan, Is it because they are reflector scopes? The intervalometer is to take the shot without touching the camera to stop vibration?

Partly, with the way a Newtonian reflector works the manufacturer has to make choices about how long the focuser tube is, if it is too long it will interfere with the light path when wound in, if it is too short the focus range is limited and some eyepieces will need extension tubes. The size of the secondary limits how long it can be as well, increasing the secondary size also blocks light from entering the scope so is not practical. Because of this scopes designed for visual use don't always have enough focuser travel to reach prime focus with a camera.

Refractor scopes don't have this problem as you can just keep adding extension tubes on the end without any serious drawbacks. Refractors are also normally designed for use with a diagonal so by removing this it gives you a big chunk of space for the camera.

Yes the intervalometer lets you take precisely time exposures without touching the camera thereby avoiding vibrations. Note that even walking around near the mount can cause vibration so it can be a case of pressing the button then leaving it to do its thing for a while.

/Dan

Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

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Or poor processing.....

Processing dslr images is not so easy, not many people actually get it right.

It's a long hard journey to produce an exceptable image

Most people never even get the exposures right going by what is normally seen, they

either under or over expose.

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The Canon 1200D appears to have a fixed screen.

I have the 650D which has the rotatable screen and it is a pleasure to use. You can angle it for easy viewing at whatever angle your scope is pointing. The screen is interactive too, this means you can change ISO and exposure without having to rotate any setting switches and thus potentially moving the point of view. The screen also has a touch and shoot mode, even the gentlest touch will initiate an exposure.

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There is one camera that does'nt need modding.

Canon 6D is about as good as it gets unmodded.

7X30sec exposure unmodded ISO 1600

6dha.jpg

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