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Current Class 1 Herschel Objects.

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These are some current bright class 1 Herschel objects. These are from " The Herschel Objects and how to observe them". Included in the book are the quite astounding observations that Sir William made.

See what you think. I'm not tempted into Virgo just yet. Last spring I caught over a hundred galaxies there with an 8" Newt. These are galaxies unless detailed otherwise, most give very enjoyable views,

Aries.

NGC 772 (+10.3)

Draco.

NGC 5866 (+10 )(ex M102, two others much fainter in fov)

Leo.

NGC 2903 ( should have been a Messier )(+8.9)

NGC 3379 (+9.3)

NGC 3521 (+8.9)

Lynx.

NGC 2419 globular cluster ( the intergalactic wanderer) (+10.4)

Canes Venatici.

NGC 5005 (+9.8)

NGC 5195 (+9.6)

NGC 4111 (+10.8)

NGC 4449 (+9.4)between the above and Y Canum Venaticorum(" La Superba")

NGC 4490 (+9.8 )the cocoon Galaxy.

NGC 4656/7 (+10.4 )the hockey stick.

Ursa Major.

NGC 2841 (+9.3)

NGC 3184 (+9.8)

NGC 3877 (+10.9)

NGC 3938 (+10.4)

NGC 4036 (+10.6)

NGC 4088 (+10.5)

Wait for a clear night , a bit of aperture and increase magnification from a searching one up to x80 to give more contrast. Hopefully under

Clear skies ,

Nick.

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Thats a nice list Nick - something to look forward to when the rain / clouds allow :smiley:

I had a peek at NGC 2419 the other evening with a 6" scope. Faint, despite it's published magnitude but then it is a long, long, long way away.

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Nick a great list of galaxies to view. I enjoyed viewing the Herschel 400 list and I noticed that many of your listed objects are also contained in the Caldwell or Hidden Treasurers (Steve O'Meara) lists.

Let us hope we can soon get outside and view some of these delights.

Nick best wishes for 2016 - hopefully will see you in March at SGLX1.

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I dabbled with these galaxies last year. Found a few but the biggest problem was identifying which was which. I managed to get the Cambridge Herschel catalogue for the princely sum of £1, so hopefully this will help.

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Thanks Nick

The thing that I love about your lists, is that there is always something in there that I haven't seen before!

Paul

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Thanks Nick

The thing that I love about your lists, is that there is always something in there that I haven't seen before!

Paul

He's a man of wealth and taste you know!
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Nick, this is a nice list! I am searching on Google one by one. Those are really pretty targets!

Good luck, dobmobs! :)

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Great info yet again Nick. It's about time the mods put a section up just for your reports and targets.

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That's a good list.

Does anyone have a view on the best book of Herschel objects. The Bratton one sounds good but so does the O'Meara book It's a bit of a guess without seeing them both to compare.

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That's a good list.

Does anyone have a view on the best book of Herschel objects. The Bratton one sounds good but so does the O'Meara book It's a bit of a guess without seeing them both to compare.

I've got the O'Meara Herschel 400 offering. It is very good book, but annoys me intensely. This is a purely personal thing.

Mr O knows his eggs. He enjoys super dark sky and is clearly a very skilled observer. However, I do not enjoy super dark sky and am a far from skilled observer. So, to repeatedly read "this is doeable with a 4" scope" after spending a fruitless hour completely failing with a 10" scope, I begin to get resentful.

The book is arranged into several observing sessions per month with good descriptions of each object, many with helpfull pictures & maps. If you don't mind handing over complete control to Mr O'Meara, this book is perfect. I would prefere to reorder the notes into RA order and plan my own sessions. Even with these personal hang ups, I still think that it is well worth the money.

The Cambridge Atlas of Herschel Objects is excellent. But the maps use solely Herschel's numbering which means the translation to NGC numbers can be a pain. And there are obviously no observing notes.

Hope that that this helps.

I'll have to try the Bratton book.

Paul

Edited by Paul73

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O'Meara's a bit like Marmite, often do-able with a 4" scope means either in the middle of a desert of halfway up a volcano.

However his breadth of targets has started many searches.

"The Herschel Objects and how to observe them" by James Mullaney is a fine thin book ,

very user friendly for us Permacloud dwellers,

Nick.

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I must admit that I have the Steve O'Meara's Herschel book and I don't refer to it that often. I simply have a list of the 400 Herschel objects and plan my nights observing using detailed star maps like Uranometria 2000. I recently acquired the Interstellarum Deep Sky Atlas which provides info on visible objects in a 4", 8" and 12" scope from a reasonable dark site.

I would add that most of my Herschel 400 observations were carried out with a 10" Dob.

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Thanks for the replies about Herschel books.

Astronomy books seem to be a bit like telescopes in that there are so many choices!

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Fortunately, the majority of asto books are cheaper than telescopes. Saying that, tracking down the 3 volumes of the latest edition Uranometria did leave a bit of a hole in the wallet!

Paul

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Apart from being awful weather i have not had my scope out for six months maybe as got 2 collapsed discs causing severe pain and numbness in my legs, I greatly appreciate these reports and like seeing the sketches as that's about the best can hope for at the moment.

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Nice list Nick, at least we know yours are doable from what we all call reasonable conditions. I sometimes wonder what the point it of stating what can be seen from A1 perfect conditions as very few of us ever get the chance to view from anything close to it, still each to his own..

I keep looking at the Cambridge book/atlas on Herschel objects, they are back in my good books after the new doubles atlas, the other one though is for give away it is the worst atlas I have ever bought.

Alan

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