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ashlik47

NexStar alignment FAIL!

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Ugh..... [emoji25]

I'm trying to stay positive and focused. This is basically my first decent telescope and I would really like to start viewing and figuring out thr sky more.

I feel my next star system should help me find items and learn where to look...... But I can't figure it out!!!!

I feel I am choosing the correct alignment stars, (even though I will admit I've had trouble with that a bit) I am not sure do I need to use a large lense when aligning?

Any help or suggestions please would make me a happy girl! [emoji7]

Anywhooo my telescope is a Celestron starseeker 130 (though I can only find info for a orion starseeker 130) and has the next star GT.

Thanks in advanced [emoji106] [emoji106] [emoji106] [emoji106]

Sent from my SM-G900P using Tapatalk

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Hi Ashlik47,

I've owned a Celestron Goto but not your exact model.

Things to check are that you have set the tripod up as level as you can. That whatever you are using to power the mount is delivering the required power...the mounts are power critical and I made the mistake of using ni-cads. That you have set up the date and time correctly in the USA format, and that you have entered in the correct latitude and longitude.

My Nexstar didn't do as well on the 3 star point at any bright object alignment routine, BUT was usually accurate using the auto two star alignment. Looks like you are using an android phone (?) so download the free Goigle Sky maps to help you find the right stars. Or on your PC Stellarium.

Stick with it, because the marketing of these products make them sound easy to set up, but there are things to look out for...practice and you'll get there. Good luck!

Chris

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Hi Ashlik47,

I've owned a Celestron Goto but not your exact model.

Things to check are that you have set the tripod up as level as you can. That whatever you are using to power the mount is delivering the required power...the mounts are power critical and I made the mistake of using ni-cads. That you have set up the date and time correctly in the USA format, and that you have entered in the correct latitude and longitude.

My Nexstar didn't do as well on the 3 star point at any bright object alignment routine, BUT was usually accurate using the auto two star alignment. Looks like you are using an android phone (?) so download the free Goigle Sky maps to help you find the right stars. Or on your PC Stellarium.

Stick with it, because the marketing of these products make them sound easy to set up, but there are things to look out for...practice and you'll get there. Good luck!

Chris

Maybe power can be my issue. I have a batter pack and my motor does seem to run slow when it's cold out.

I belive I'm level and I use a few different apps on the phone.

I will look into power options.

How about when aligning a specific star, do I need to use a specific size magnification to center the object?

Sent from my SM-G900P using Tapatalk

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Always start with your widest lens - with my Nexstar 5SE, I used the standard Celestron 25mm lens that came with the scope to align...the first moves in the alignment routine are faster, and then slower as you centre the object in the eyepiece. If that makes sense?

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Have you aligned your finderscope /RDF with your main tube? Preferably during the day?

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Have you aligned your finderscope /RDF with your main tube? Preferably during the day?

Yes, the view finder is good. The object is always in my lense after I use the view finder.

Sent from my SM-G900P using Tapatalk

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Also it's only asked me my city and state. It's never asked me any actual coordinates

Sent from my SM-G900P using Tapatalk

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Ok. I tried a quick one star align with Polaris and it accepted. Tried to go to another location using the nextstar and I think im still off. I do think power might be a issue, I can see the screen dimming while moving. Also it's a good 20 degrees outside.

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I would reinforce Cjg's suggestion that it is probably power. I have a 4se that will only run reliably for 45 mins on a new set of AA batteries. All my problems disappeared once I bought a 12v power supply eg a car jumpstarter with 12v cigarette lighter output.

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Are you just using the single star alignment, if so start using two star alignment. In the manual it does say the single star alignment is not that accurate whereas the 2 star alignment, having two points of reference is definately going to be much more accurate.

ALso re: batteries, it will run off standard batteries accurately but only for a shortish time, maybe 2 -3 hours. On a dedicated power pack this can be much longer into 10+ hours. However in the meantime if you want to carry on trying until you get a power pack, go out and buy good quality disposable batteries to use but be prepared to replace them every few hours at most, this can get expensive but it is an interim answer to your problem.

hth

steve

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As mentioned nail down any suspected power issues.

Ensure date is in correct US format, and time exact.

Apply your exact co-ordinates in degrees minutes and seconds. You can get this info from many web sites.

Cross reference your alignment stars with a sky map app so you know what your aiming at and use 2 star auto align.

Use 2 stars wide apart and higher than 30 degrees but lower than 70 degrees in the sky

Use a 25mm or above for initial align fix

Use the same method of approach to your star when in the slow slew stage, eg up and to the right.

Defocus the alignment star and turn it into a large doughnut, this will help centre it in the EP 

Always ensure finder and scope are well aligned

Good luck, enjoy the scope.

Edited by JG777

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The nexstar slt is also known for a Problem with the clutch for alt axis. It is often too loose and then will move not correctly with the Motor. You have to open the cover for it and carefully ! Tighten a nut.

Carsten

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Sounds like power, you mention the motors slow and the display dims.

I use a new pack of high power ones every time I take my little scope out and I really expect about an hours use.

I assume you are in the US to have a suitable list of locations to select from, they should supply co-ordinates and time zone correctly.

Greater accuracy is possible by entering your location as a custom location and you can then get the Long+Lat better, you will need to enter your timezone.

Use the longest eyepiece, wider view.

Always best to level the mount as much as you can within reason, Also check what the manual says:

http://www.nexstarsite.com/download/manuals/CelestronStarSeeker.pdf

Very likely the same as the Orion but it does start out saying Celestron.

After a quick read: Which 2 stars have you been selecting to perform the alighment with? Maybe only 1 now I come to think of it but nice to know. Skywatcher have a strange habit of offering some pretty insignificant ones when there are better big bright ones in the same area.

One other thing: You are not the first and you will not be the last to have hours of tearing your hair out, swearing at the scope, and debating where to throw a goto scope :eek: :eek: . Most that own them have at first gone through this. It "normal". :grin: :grin: :grin: :grin: :grin: :grin:

Edited by ronin
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If you're using a set of AA batteries then don't expect the slewing to last more than an hour. They drain pretty quick - especially when it's cold. All these scopes need a good, sustained, 12V supply and they just can't run on small battery packs - lucky if you get an hour out of them. Slow or strained slewing, tracking/goto/alignment errors, and screen dimming all at once are classic signs you need a leisure battery or power pack. Hth :)

Edited by brantuk

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So glad to get so many people posting on the power issues, deffinity makes me feel better that my scope isn't a POS.

Sooo I stayed up late last night and decided to try to play around a bit inside by my large glass door.

I did a quick one star alignment, also this time typed in a normal time not military, and it seemed to work! I typed in a messier number a bit under my alignment star. I ended up being able to see the edge of it in my scope and I only had to move over a bit.

Very excited, and I will getting my new power supply set up and ready to go for our next clear night.

Anyone have any suggestions on filters? I have the celestron lense and filter kit. What color is best for nebula viewing?

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Some nebulae respond well to an O3 filter - and UHC is good for a lot of objects - there's also LPR's you can use. But I had that filter kit a long time ago and found it a complete waste of time. They're not very good quality at all and just block out light totally changing the hue of the object. Planets were most unpleasant to view with a green or blue tinge and several moon features were blocked out rather than anything being enhanced.

But it may be my eyes - your's might get a different experience - so try them by all means but you may get fed up with them in the end. :)

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I differ from Brantuk in that I like my colour filters. Find the yellow is fab on the moon and blue or yellow seem to work well on Saturn.

As your scope is a 130 aperture I would suggest the best all round filter for nebulae is a UHC type. O-III filters tend to respond better to scope with a larger aperture although that's not to say it wouldn't work with yours, I just think a better option would be the UHC. If you did get an O-III it would be best keeping to lower magnifications to allow plenty of light in. See the link below for further information.

http://www.cloudynights.com/item.php?item_id=1520#top

steve

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Oh man..... I got some learning on filters it sounds like...

Sent from my SM-G900P using Tapatalk

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It will be purely a case of getting used to ithe scope. I am fortunate a store here sell 6 high power AA's for £1, my scope uses 6 AA's so a perfect match.

When it comes to filters I would say that the ones in the kit are not relevant to viewing nebula. They are I would guess be fairly simple colour filters, red, yellow, green blue at a guess. Nebula need something a bit more "tightly" defined.

A nebula like The Rosette will be emitting a fair bit in the Hydrogen Alpha, red but a narrow section of red.

So what people do it get a narrow visual Ha filter so that just that portion of the spectrum comes through.

The intention being that just that bits gets through, the remainder is blocked and you see just the red but little else and so the contrast is hightened and the object is more obvious. Gets a bit complicated.

There is a "nebula" filter that passes through the Ha and a green/blue bit of the spectrum, the OIII (O 3) bit of the spectrum.

Same principle as previous you get through into the eye both Ha and OIII - this is a sort of dual pass as nebula often emit in either Ha or OIII so that allows both through.

They are not inexpensive however.

The coloured filter in the kit might be of use on Jupiter and Saturn. Some people find that some change the visual effect to something they prefer. By the same token others think the change is worthless. Easy answer is find Jupiter, get the magification up to about 80x and try one or two. Try the moon also, big, bright, easy (usually) to locate.

One aspect of a filter is they never add anything, they always remove a bit of the spectrum (maybe a big bit).

You do not put a red filter in to get more red, you put a red filter in to reduce green and blue.

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"Oh man..... I got some learning on filters it sounds like..."

It's a bit like eyepieces - it's all a very personal thing to the individual observer. Everyone's eye's are different and what you really need to learn about filters is what suits you best. There's not always a "one solution suits all" answer to it. :)

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