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Wardr77

Revelation 25x100 - collimation

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Guess what I got for a Christmas pressie :) a complete surprise from my dear wife. However it is obvious the collimation is slightly off, I am not familiar with astro binos of this size, but would expect to get a nice circle when looking through them, which I am not, it's close but not quite there. Does anyone have any experience collimating these? Any advice appreciated.

Many thanks

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My 22x80 binos  are the same. Not 100%.

I am frightened of making them worse.

I would not know were to start, so I leave

them alone. U might find U need a tripod,

as well. U will have some fun with them.

Nice Xmas pressie. :icon_santa: 

Steve

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Guess what I got for a Christmas pressie :) a complete surprise from my dear wife. However it is obvious the collimation is slightly off, I am not familiar with astro binos of this size, but would expect to get a nice circle when looking through them, which I am not, it's close but not quite there. Does anyone have any experience collimating these? Any advice appreciated.

Many thanks

Do you get a double image or are you able to merge the two views ok?

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Do you get a double image or are you able to merge the two views ok?

Not quite a double image but certainly a detectable fig 8 on its side if that makes sense. Maybe a chat with the dealer is required?

Hope you all had a good Christmas.

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Not quite a double image but certainly a detectable fig 8 on its side if that makes sense.

Apologies if I'm misunderstanding you, but a "fig 8 on its side", if it'a like they show in movies as a view through binoculars (*), usually means that the inter-pupillary distance is incorrectly set (usually too wide)

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There is a technical term for this depiction of a binocular view: "wrong".

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Apologies if I'm misunderstanding you, but a "fig 8 on its side", if it'a like they show in movies as a view through binoculars (*), usually means that the inter-pupillary distance is incorrectly set (usually too wide)

.

.

.

.

There is a technical term for this depiction of a binocular view: "wrong".

Probably not a great description on my part, I have adjusted the width to narrow, wide and comfortable, but still cannot achieve a good viewing 'circle' like I can in my 10x50's, the viewing experience therefore is not pleasant. Unfortunately i do not have a better technical term to describe the problem, though I'm pretty confident it's a collimation issue. I was hoping collimation would be simple task, but after a bit of Internet research I'm not so sure it is.

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If you can find the collimating screws - usually flat head screws on the side if the prism housing facing you it is then a case of testing how moving each screw moves the view and then once you have established this make small movements at a time until things are lined up. Ideally recording what you have changed so you don't get lost and can go back if necessary.

You need a tripod, and it helps to colour filter one side so you can easily see and distinguish the different images and know which is which.

A lamppost in the distance (at night!) is good as a stationery target to get roughly right but you can't beat using a star for getting it perfect.

I would recommend making sure you have the ipd set correctly before collimating.

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Just in case its of any use after all this time, I have just dismantled one of these. The collimation is achieved by tilting the prism cage, which is under the prism cover plate. There are pairs of push-pull screws for this purpose; they are Phillips (not pozidriv - but a pozi screwdriver will probably be OK) head. To remove the cover plate, you need to undo three grubscrews securing the rotating part of the eyepiece; they are under the eye-cup rubbers, and lift the rotating part off.

The whole thing is quite a faff!

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Hi - if its any help, I have collimated several smaller pairs of binoculars with success and can recommend using a medium magnitude star- only adjust one screw at a time and note down exactly what you did so this can always be reversed - with a star, small separations in the images of the binoculars are very obvious and making small adjustments can get you closer and closer to perfection - the results on terrestrial viewing were dramatic - Tony

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