Jump to content

Stargazers Lounge Uses Cookies

Like most websites, SGL uses cookies in order to deliver a secure, personalised service, to provide social media functions and to analyse our traffic. Continued use of SGL indicates your acceptance of our cookie policy.

John

ISS + Tim Peake Rendezvous

Recommended Posts

This is a long shot to say the least given the weather forecast but I'll post it anyway just in case anyone fancies a go and gets a clear sky.

Between 17:12pm and 17:15pm on Tuesday 15th December there is an ISS passover at a predicted magnitude of -3.3. At 17:24 the Soyuz TMA-19M spacecraft carrying Tim Peake is due to dock with the ISS (unless plans change, and they do of course).

So the Soyuz will be very, very close to the ISS at the point of the flyover. Probably too close to separate it from the ISS but likely to be up there all the same.

I've seen lots of ISS flyovers but I'll try and have a peek at this one if possible.

The docking is due to be broadcast live by ESA starting at 5:00 pm GMT. So that might be worth tuning into.

I believe "Stargazing Live" is covering the hatch opening later that evening.

Good luck to Tim and others on board the Soyuz for Tuesday :icon_salut:

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

and the forecast is... guess? Correct. Wind and heavy rain. All night.

ChrisH

It baffles me how anyone could get the ISS in their telescope given the apparent speed it moves. Even stars and planets dont stay in the field of view for more than about 20 to 30 seconds at high mag. I have had planes in my scope before now but not for more than a second. Even then I just followed the contrails in my scope. However I am interested in the time that the astronauts are planned to dock with the ISS. I am hoping to see it in the webcam link in the thread I just posted. Am not expecting it to be pointed correctly, but.............

Edited by Pluto the Snowman

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It baffles me how anyone could get the ISS in their telescope given the apparent speed it moves. Even stars and planets dont stay in the field of view for more than about 20 to 30 seconds at high mag. I have had planes in my scope before now but not for more than a second. Even then I just followed the contrails in my scope. However I am interested in the time that the astronauts are planned to dock with the ISS. I am hoping to see it in the webcam link in the thread I just posted. Am not expecting it to be pointed correctly, but.............

One of the advantages of a 10-Micron mount - it will track accurately if you give it the necessary TLE :-)  Otherwise you have the option of manually pointing the scope to follow the ISS.

ChrisH

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.