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orion nebula, can anything be done with this??


drb1976
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I sure need to take more time with the focus, seems easier with a wide field lens, I just got this 200mm lens and it sure is harder to focus

Have you tried stopping it down?

Focus is much harder to achieve at low f ratios like f2 as the steeper light cone makes the critical focus area tiny.

/Dan

Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

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Louise is right, the TS microfocuser makes life easier. If you stop down I would do it from the front with a home made aperture mask.

APERTURE%20MASK-M.jpg

The compass cutters come from graphics outlets. Using the lens' diaphragm creates multiple diff spikes whcih I found very intrusive.

Olly

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Well done on getting a good first attempt image.  Others have already pointed out issues - the way I would take what's been said, as encouragement for how to get an even better shot next time :)

Others have already mentioned the focus as an issue.  Something that I found extremely useful is a Batinov Mask.  You can use this to take a photo of a star near your target, and get the focus spot on before slewing to the object for the photo.

Once you have a focussed image, don't touch the focusser.

Moving on from that I'm seeing that the stars in the top and left of the image are round, but there is some movement in the stars to the bottom and right.

This could be an indication of lightly off Polar Alignment.

Maybe camera shake in the image

Or might be something that I don't recognise.

If it's Polar Alignment, should be better next time ;-)

If it's camera shake.  The simple answer to that is to make use of the Mirror lock up function in your camera (if it's a DSLR)

Overall however, the image is good.  Keep on going :)

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That's a good start! Great advice on here. I didn't know about the microfocuser. Looks like an excellent investment.

Alexxx

It is fiddly to use. I would suggest you go for the smallest size which will fit over the lens but it is way better than using your fingers directly, which I found impossible.

Olly

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  • 2 weeks later...

Reminds me when I started AP about 6-8 months back. Took these photos of M42. The first one is the first photo I toom with my 10" dobson. And the second photo is the one I took this December with an Orion ST 80 (achromatic) on my tracking NEQ6 mount. seems I am on the track.... :grin:

Will need expert advice on how to improve further.

post-38054-0-11015500-1450701920_thumb.j

post-38054-0-23148800-1450702322_thumb.j

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Reminds me when I started AP about 6-8 months back. Took these photos of M42. The first one is the first photo I toom with my 10" dobson. And the second photo is the one I took this December with an Orion ST 80 (achromatic) on my tracking NEQ6 mount. seems I am on the track.... :grin:

Will need expert advice on how to improve further.

wow, very nice... I need to get some tracking,, right now it's just dslr and very short exposures

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Well done on getting a good first attempt image.  Others have already pointed out issues - the way I would take what's been said, as encouragement for how to get an even better shot next time :)

Others have already mentioned the focus as an issue.  Something that I found extremely useful is a Batinov Mask.  You can use this to take a photo of a star near your target, and get the focus spot on before slewing to the object for the photo.

Once you have a focussed image, don't touch the focusser.

Moving on from that I'm seeing that the stars in the top and left of the image are round, but there is some movement in the stars to the bottom and right.

This could be an indication of lightly off Polar Alignment.

Maybe camera shake in the image

Or might be something that I don't recognise.

If it's Polar Alignment, should be better next time ;-)

If it's camera shake.  The simple answer to that is to make use of the Mirror lock up function in your camera (if it's a DSLR)

Overall however, the image is good.  Keep on going :)

yeah, i really should have taken more time with focus,  it was cold and I was excited just to see the nebula on the lcd screen, so I got a little to impatient from the excitement of actually seeing it on my camera lol

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The excitement is a wonderful thing, keep that feeling, it's one of the highlights.  Astrophotography is a very steel learning curve, and it takes a while to get good results - having said that, your first image is good, so keep on going, you are doing fantastically :)

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The excitement is a wonderful thing, keep that feeling, it's one of the highlights.  Astrophotography is a very steel learning curve, and it takes a while to get good results - having said that, your first image is good, so keep on going, you are doing fantastically :)

Absolutely agree with this ^

It is a brilliant feeling as the first sub shows you tantalising glimpses of detail. After that comes the stretching of the stack :)

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