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bomberbaz

Binoviewers, what are they really good at.

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I read different stories as to where binoviewers have thier strong points and of course I realise this will vary from person to person. So just trying to see if there is any consensus from users. 

I have a few bits for sale that will cover a WO set, so I am considering but in no rush (where have I heard that before as he buys something a few days later)

I have read (not manufacturers blurb) that the moon and planets get the best out of them, some for nebula etc. I could see them being really good on the moon in helping bring the 3D views out of it, also maybe on Jupiter and Orion Nebula as the latter two are quite bright anyway.

So what does anyone else find ?

Steve

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I was told that, due to the normal binocular processing of information from the eyes to the brain, that more subtle detail can be observed and in a more relaxed fashion. I would sure like to view through a bino and check it out, but the cost of the device and double the eyepiece cost makes me curious but wary.

Peter.

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I've tried them before and for me the biggest benefit was that they were very relaxing to use on objects which you observe for longer periods so Jupiter, Mars and the moon.

I did find that they did dim the view considerably and at the time I was using a Skymax 180 so never tried them on DSO's, for DSO's I want to keep the maximum brightness so binoviewers were out of the question.

My problem with them (and I had a set of WO) was one eye didn't focus correctly, it didn't matter what I tried I just could get the left side sharp!

Maybe the more expensive BV's can be collimated better but it would be pretty expensive to find out after you buy EP's aswell.

post-20821-0-78969100-1446288946.jpg

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I love using my binoviewer for lunar the best so far, for me it's worth it just for the moon. Lke Mike I find it makes for more relaxed viewing, my eyes feel very comfy instead of a bit concentrated. I also seem to pick out finer details more easily with the combined input of both eyes.

You can get by without them, but for me if I want to have a fairly long session on the moon, I tend to use the bino.

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You can get by without them.

A good pal lent me a pair for a while as a try-before-you-buy thing...they are a nice addition to the observing experience, not an essential.  I might get a pair for a Christmas pressie....

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Wow, just checked my paypal balance and its a LOT higher than I thought. Gonna borrow a pair to test I think and then decide.

One other question, is there any change to the orientation of the Moon when using binovewers?

Steve

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I would say comfort is the most significant aspect. People are kind of designed to operate with both eyes open to look at something and binoviewers enable this.

However it means 2 eyepieces not 1.

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I use my binoviewers with 2x TV 15mm plossls in my dobs for the Moon, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, and and white light solar - I don't use on DSOs.

I've found them very successful for getting the most detail on Jupiter and Saturn especially.

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I'm surprised that people don't say they improve sharpness. I'm short sighted and I find that, with glasses, both eyes together are much better than either on their own. Of course with an EP I may be able to get a better focus than with specs.

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Hi Steve.

I love my cheap bino viewer. Coupled with a pair of cheap 16.8mm orthoscopics it gives superior views of the moon and planets than the view through a single Pentax XW. The only problem is that a binoviewer needs to be set to your personal eye separation and individual eye focus and that makes them unfriendly for group viewing.

As far as dimming the moon and planets, I've never noticed it. Even on brighter DSOs they work well, though the field is limited.

I hope you can borrow a bv, if not you're welcome to come and try mine and put it through its paces.

Mike

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I've tried them before and for me the biggest benefit was that they were very relaxing to use on objects which you observe for longer periods so Jupiter, Mars and the moon.

I did find that they did dim the view considerably and at the time I was using a Skymax 180 so never tried them on DSO's, for DSO's I want to keep the maximum brightness so binoviewers were out of the question.

My problem with them (and I had a set of WO) was one eye didn't focus correctly, it didn't matter what I tried I just could get the left side sharp!

Maybe the more expensive BV's can be collimated better but it would be pretty expensive to find out after you buy EP's aswell.

With an F15 scope you were probably seeing aperture reduction due to the over long light path.

Were you using a 2" diagonal too ?

This would make it worse : maybe making your scope equivalent to a 6" or less.

Your focal length would be approaching 3 metres, hence the dim, over magnified view.

To get the best out of an SCT / MAC when binoviewing you need to keep the lightpath as short as you can.

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With an F15 scope you were probably seeing aperture reduction due to the over long light path.

Were you using a 2" diagonal too ?

This would make it worse : maybe making your scope equivalent to a 6" or less.

Your focal length would be approaching 3 metres, hence the dim, over magnified view.

To get the best out of an SCT / MAC when binoviewing you need to keep the lightpath as short as you can.

Ah ok thanks. :)

I never tried DSO's with BV's as I bought then just for observing Jupiter and the moon really. It was a very relaxing experience though and one that I've been tempted to try again.

My biggest 'problem' with them was no matter what I tried I couldn't get sharp focus through the left eyepiece?

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Binoviewers gives tottaly new experience in astronomy observations of all objects, especially Planets, Moon and Sun. I use them 99% of my observing time, and this tells enough.

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Mike

It sounds to me as though your viewers might have been out of collimation, is both sides weren't properly aligned with each other. Its more common with binoculars where you have two separate objectives, but in the viewers you still have two prisms splitting one light path so maybe the left hand side had been misaligned (dropped or knocked?) at some point.

If so, you would probably need to send them to Telescope House or other expert for realignment. If you bought new they would be replaceable under warranty.

When bvs are properly aligned the views just "fit" and are amazing.

I still prefer using native magnifications though (is no Barlow) where possible, although this isn't easy or possible with some scopes without shortening the tube. I don't know why more scope makers don't supply scopes with a shorter tube and a 100mm or so decent tube extension for Cyclops viewing - like Takahashi do.

I can't believe it need add more than around 5-10% to the cost of the scope..

Dave

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Seems like diopter(s) might be in order where you have variations between your eyes:

http://www.televue.com/engine/TV3b_page.asp?id=54#.VkXOT7fhBD8

I would caution that this is purely hypothetical on my part, and only based on my experience of high end camera equipment in the film industry, rather than detailed experience of optical equipment for astronomy!

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