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JB80

Calcium Quark

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The Quark is in that odd place of being dirt cheap and very expensive at the same time! :grin:

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Checking the price here:

https://www.astromarket.org/solar-astronomy213747/daystar-quark-h-alpha-filter/quark-h-alpha-eyepiece----chromosphere-03-05367553?language=en

as posted earlier in this thread, and comparing the price of 1,299 euro to that of a 1200 CaK module from Lunt (1535 euro at TS, 1,400 for straight or diagonal version at Robtics), I do wonder why I should go for an untested design, which also needs power and warm-up time, compared to a system that works out of the box. The free aperture may on paper be larger, but the need for a tele-centric lens evens that out.

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Pre-order form from Daystar, with a touch more info?

http://www.icstars.com/Store/daystar/quark/daystar-instruments-combo-quark-calcium.html

"For use on F/7 or longer focal ratio refractors, the user needn't worry about configurations. Just insert in your diagonal, add an eyepiece and view.  Short focal ratio refractors will need a 2x or 2.5x Powermate to get the best performance.  Exact filter bandpass will vary based on final telescope application.  No specific FWHM bandpass is designated, but it will be around 5Å. The fully optimized design eliminates the need for any adapters. It's all combined in one lightweight eyepiece sized device. The new, compact design configuration eliminates unnecessary components, weight and associated costs. We even reduced power consumption, so the Quark can now operate all day off a small, palm-sized optional battery pack. Baffles have been added to increase contrast and AR coatings are optimized for the 397nm wavelength."

Edited by Luke
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The Lunt module has been a constant temptation but a few things have confused me about it.

Like the B1800 module, at 1800 Euros, it says on the TS website:

"For telescopes up to 102 mm aperture and up to 1800 mm focal length. For imaging it will be better to use a bigger Ca-K module."

Maybe I am being optimistic but I'd like to use my 120mm scope as well as my smaller scopes. And what is meant by for imaging, a bigger CaK module is better? Would an ASI174 on a 100mm scope be okay?

And the Lunt Ca-K Module with B3400 Blocking Filter in Extension Tube for 2" Focuser - 3065 Euros (way over my budget) - still says up to 102mm aperture.

I also thought I read something about there being a problem fitting the module with some focusers?

On the other hand, the Lunt is specified as <2.4 Ångström bandwidth. But I really like the idea of visual too that is being dangled with the Quark! :grin:

Checking the price here:

https://www.astromarket.org/solar-astronomy213747/daystar-quark-h-alpha-filter/quark-h-alpha-eyepiece----chromosphere-03-05367553?language=en

as posted earlier in this thread, and comparing the price of 1,299 euro to that of a 1200 CaK module from Lunt (1535 euro at TS, 1,400 for straight or diagonal version at Robtics), I do wonder why I should go for an untested design, which also needs power and warm-up time, compared to a system that works out of the box. The free aperture may on paper be larger, but the need for a tele-centric lens evens that out.

Edited by Luke
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The Lunt CaK modules are rated four 4" aperture, or larger IF some extra filter is placed in the optical path. I am planning to get e.g. a 5" or 6" scope for more detail, fitted with my tri-band ERF halfway down the tube (ensures only a fraction of the total energy reaches the filter). a B1200 works up to about 1200mm  for visual, but in the 4" F/6.5 scope I have been looking at (660mm focal length), the 1200 is fine for imaging the full disk. Even the 988mm focal length of the ES AR152 should be fine. Likewise the 1800 should be fine for imaging the full disk up to 1500mm focal length.

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I have the PST CaK scope but can't see anything through it (probably due to yellowing of my cornea) but my grandson in his 20th can view through it successfully. I use a regular digital camera for violet CaK 'viewing' and record but must confess I prefer the PST Ha view :-)

Nytecam

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