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Colonialisation of the outer solar system


Macavity
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who among us believes we could learn to settle our differences and live together in peace and harmony for 100 years?

Not me, and I don't think we ever will. It would require an evolutionary leap that is impossible to achieve now that we have found ways of subverting natural selection. (oh dear, let's not go there!)

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On the above notes, I'll toss this mess out for review:

The SETI-Project (Search for Extra-Terrestrial Intelligence) run out of Berkeley, California had a bug recently. Seems a router somewhere on the campus died, taking down the project. I had been crunching data for around 15 years.

After several days, it was somewhat working, but I kept having trouble. My computer was refusing to download, wouldn't let me apply a setting or three, so forth. It got steadily worse. So I went into the website and wrote up my situation. Could anyone tell me what was going on? And the responses I got from other members were met by the ravings of a sociopathic, bombastic nitwit. He declared me stupid for not using Norton's as my anti-virus. Told the group I was a "stupid whiner." And then he got quite ugly! No one came to my aide. Too afraid of being the next target of this nutter.

So while my computer was happy working with Seti switched over into the 'Suspend' mode, I took some time off to reflect.....

Did I really want to help find another civilization of intelligent life somewhere in our galaxy? Thinking about this pathological encounter I had within Seti itself, I decided against it. My reasoning was that if we did chance to find other people somewhere, a hostile lunatic, such as the person who attacked me, would steal the spotlight and attack the people of Kepler 281 or such. Probably offering to eat them and tell them he would dispatch a interstellar spacecraft to beam-up their people for processing.

I uninstalled Seti.

Pity,

Dave

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The only way we're going to get off-planet and establish viable settlements is by pooling resources - either governments or corporations, and that's only going to happen when the positives far out way the negatives i.e. when there's profit in it.

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All we need to complete the colonisation of the Outer Solar System is a ship full of optimists.

The realists can watch through telescopes!

Seriously, though..... the only hope is probably the creation of intelligent machines or transfer of human mind into such a machine.

Suitably tough for space journeys and no need to take air, water, food!

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All we need to complete the colonisation of the Outer Solar System is a ship full of optimists.

The realists can watch through telescopes!

Seriously, though..... the only hope is probably the creation of intelligent machines or transfer of human mind into such a machine.

Suitably tough for space journeys and no need to take air, water, food!

This is a good point. we have never colonised an alien environment on earth (deep ocean, dessert regions) so there is little hope of doing it off world for anything more than a quick visit. The human race will need to evolve as cyborgs or intelligent machines with human interlect to colonise space permanently.

Alan

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This is a good point. we have never colonised an alien environment on earth (deep ocean, dessert regions) so there is little hope of doing it off world for anything more than a quick visit. The human race will need to evolve as cyborgs or intelligent machines with human interlect to colonise space permanently.

Alan

Mojave, Taureg, Kalahari Bushmen as just a few representatives of successful desert dwellers. As for the ocean, we only started to seriously explore it in the early 1950's, about the same time as we began to develop rockets, so you could say that space and deep sea research are very much on a par just now.

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Tbh with all this talk I can only make sense of half of it. For example, you won't know what a 'dilithium crystal' is till you watch star wars. Not my kind of thing, sorry.

Notwithstanding, this talk reminds me of a short story – The dirt on our shoes by Neal Shusterman

The story's about a small community living in a 'T-bin', travelling to colonise another planet. The t-bin's size is about the size of Central Park, and it generates it's own gravity.

It's losing water when all water used should be recycled, and no leaks were detected.

Eventually they knew what the 'T-bin' stands for, and they knew that the waste unrecycled water is used for the growth of bacteria, as the scientists who launched them off in the first place thought that to spread life on another planet, they need to start with the basic unit of life.

They need nutrients, the best source for that would be humans as they can generate waste and control the T-bin at the same time.

In the end the community who didn't knew about it proceeded to land on the new planet, they ejected out of parachute seats, which did not have parachutes.

The ones who knew – unsurprisingly, a man and a woman – survived and they plan to continue their life on the planet.

The end.

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......."Tbh with all this talk I can only make sense of half of it. For example, you won't know what a 'dilithium crystal' is till you watch star wars. Not my kind of thing, sorry.

Notwithstanding, this talk reminds me of a short story – The dirt on our shoes by Neal Shusterman."......

The end.

"dilithium" is from Star Trek, not Star Wars.

Dave

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Tbh with all this talk I can only make sense of half of it. For example, you won't know what a 'dilithium crystal' is till you watch star wars. Not my kind of thing, sorry.

Notwithstanding, this talk reminds me of a short story – The dirt on our shoes by Neal Shusterman

The story's about a small community living in a 'T-bin', travelling to colonise another planet. The t-bin's size is about the size of Central Park, and it generates it's own gravity.

It's losing water when all water used should be recycled, and no leaks were detected.

Eventually they knew what the 'T-bin' stands for, and they knew that the waste unrecycled water is used for the growth of bacteria, as the scientists who launched them off in the first place thought that to spread life on another planet, they need to start with the basic unit of life.

They need nutrients, the best source for that would be humans as they can generate waste and control the T-bin at the same time.

In the end the community who didn't knew about it proceeded to land on the new planet, they ejected out of parachute seats, which did not have parachutes.

The ones who knew – unsurprisingly, a man and a woman – survived and they plan to continue their life on the planet.

The end.

Edited by LukeSkywatcher
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We have colonised lots of places where the man-in-the-street would be dead quickly - lots of deserts, the Arctic (Eskimo's), under the sea (if you are on Trident sub of months), even Wigan. But space is just a bit of a bigger challenge. There are, it sems, four choices:

  • find an environment where we can live without major difficulty - not too many of those quite yet off-planet, it seems - but it sort of worked for Australia;
  • isolate ourselves from the environment - like the ISS (or Arthur Clarke's "Imperial Earth");
  • change the environment - terraform it - bugs on Venus, massive ice asteroid impacts on Mars, spin down Jupiter;
  • change ourselves - like in James Blish's "Seedling Stars" - where "men" were altered by "pantropy" to fit in (a bit like being married)

Then of course, wherever people go, they will argue about race, religion and the benefits of the type of mount/scope used.

P

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We have colonised lots of places where the man-in-the-street would be dead quickly - lots of deserts, the Arctic (Eskimo's), under the sea (if you are on Trident sub of months), even Wigan. But space is just a bit of a bigger challenge. There are, it sems, four choices:

  • find an environment where we can live without major difficulty - not too many of those quite yet off-planet, it seems - but it sort of worked for Australia;
  • isolate ourselves from the environment - like the ISS (or Arthur Clarke's "Imperial Earth");
  • change the environment - terraform it - bugs on Venus, massive ice asteroid impacts on Mars, spin down Jupiter;
  • change ourselves - like in James Blish's "Seedling Stars" - where "men" were altered by "pantropy" to fit in (a bit like being married)

Then of course, wherever people go, they will argue about race, religion and the benefits of the type of mount/scope used.

P

I doubt if we're confined to just four options, but I would agree with the broad scope of what you've said. We'll live where we can and change where we can't, that is, if it's worth while. As I said earlier, it's all down to investment against return.

By the way, in your profile you spelt "wrench" wrongly :grin: .

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I doubt if we're confined to just four options, but I would agree with the broad scope of what you've said. We'll live where we can and change where we can't, that is, if it's worth while. As I said earlier, it's all down to investment against return.

By the way, in your profile you spelt "wrench" wrongly :grin: .

Wrench/Wench? - That depends on what tighten's your nuts. In my case, being a bit disabled, it means that my SO has to open the lid on the obsy..

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