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hi guys just got my first scope its a konusmotor 500 it has a apeture of 4.5" and a focal length of 500mm the focal ratio is is f/4.3 i have the following lenses 4mm, 10mm, 12.5mm 17mm and 22mm i also have barlow x2, barlow x3, and barlow x5 and various filters what will this telescope be able to see in good seeing conditions

Thankyou

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What you will be able to see depends on a lot of factors. You will at least be able to see Moon, Planets and some of their moons, Open Star Clusters, and some Globular Clusters.

If you have good clear skies, low light pollution, good dark adaptation and patience, you should be able to see some of the larger, brighter galaxies.

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Scope to me seems a bit odd, an f/4.5 reflector if parabolic is not easy to produce but I cannot read if it is parabolic or not. If it is an f/4.5 spherical then the performance will be limited.

One site advertising it has this on the page:

RRP: £174.99

All prices include VAT @ 20%

Our Price! - £189.99

Never seen a retailer advertising a purchase cost £15 higher then the RRP and thinking it will attract people. :confused: :confused:

The eyepieces you have - 4mm, 10mm, 12.5mm, 17mm and 22mm - should cover just about everything, so for simplicity leave the barlows out of it.

You may find the 12.5 and the 2x barlow useful as it fill a bit of a gap. A lot will depend on how good the barlows are.

At 500mm focal length the 4mm will give 125x, that is enough if the image is clear to see Saturn, as Jupiter is bigger (when it arrives) then something like 60-80x will be enough for that. That is the 2x barlow and the 12.5mm eyepiece.

To keep it simple I suggest observing a few clusters, M13, Pleiades, Double Cluster C14, being the obvious and easy ones.

M42 Orion Nebula when it makes a convenient appearance is another, again 50x on that is enough, perhaps a bit less = 12.5mm on it's own, even the 17mm.

Another set of objects are double stars, Albireo, Mizar, Almaak.

No idea what was, or is, said concerning maximum magnification but I would say do not expect more then 125x (the 4mm EP), and that may not deliver a good image. Simply no real information/specification on the mirror.

Suggest you try the scope out on say M13 in Hercules, the double cluster in Perseus, Mizar and Albireo and see for yourself how well it performs. Then having an idea of where it works well or best come back and ask for more ideas.

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Hi And congratulations on the new scope , get ready for some time travel ( the light from stars and galaxies have been travelling millions of years) you will see most things clusters galaxies nebula,planets our moon ,and much much more

The big and hardest part is knowing where and when to look ,what are you interests mine being are moon ,clusters, doubles and sketching all that I see

Tips if any , once you find say a cluster your looking for have a look a good look not a 5 min job I usually spend 15/20 mins also what I do if it's a first timer I will nudge the scope and then try and find it again .set just a few targets a night research them it's great fun and kills time whilst the scope is cooling down .the greatest thing I have ever brought besides the scope is a planisphere they cost a few quid and they never run out of battery's

Apps for smartphones are just as good learning constellations and what viewable objects they have is money in the bank as they say

Let us no about you first night out

Keep looking up

Pat

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hi guys just got my first scope its a konusmotor 500 it has a apeture of 4.5" and a focal length of 500mm the focal ratio is is f/4.3 i have the following lenses 4mm, 10mm, 12.5mm 17mm and 22mm i also have barlow x2, barlow x3, and barlow x5 and various filters what will this telescope be able to see in good seeing conditions

Thankyou

Looking at the price stated above, you may be dissapointed.  The eyepieces and barlows will be Rubbish, and if it has a spherical mirror then that's not good either.  You may find that the higher magnification eyepieces give poor results and the focusing is hard to achieve..and forget using the 5x barlow... the result will be very blurred and dark on anything other than the moon.

You'll see the Moon, Disk of Jupiter and the four inner moons, although you won't get much detail, if any, and Saturn with the rings.  But the images will be small, don't expect to see large disks with lots of belt detail on Jupiter.

It's a shame you didn't come here before you purchased your scope.  For around the same sort of money you could of purchased a Skywatcher 130P (http://www.firstlightoptics.com/beginner-telescopes/skywatcher-explorer-130p.html) which IMO will be a better scope.

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What you've bought is a darn sight better than my first scope (my father's actually) and that got me hooked for life.

The first target I managed to see after much faffing about was Saturn, it looked fabulous, I thought the detail was magnificent (it certainly wasn't).

Enjoy it and let us know how you get on!

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Looking at the price stated above, you may be dissapointed.  The eyepieces and barlows will be Rubbish, and if it has a spherical mirror then that's not good either.  You may find that the higher magnification eyepieces give poor results and the focusing is hard to achieve..and forget using the 5x barlow... the result will be very blurred and dark on anything other than the moon.

You'll see the Moon, Disk of Jupiter and the four inner moons, although you won't get much detail, if any, and Saturn with the rings.  But the images will be small, don't expect to see large disks with lots of belt detail on Jupiter.

It's a shame you didn't come here before you purchased your scope.  For around the same sort of money you could of purchased a Skywatcher 130P (http://www.firstlightoptics.com/beginner-telescopes/skywatcher-explorer-130p.html) which IMO will be a better scope.

I wouldn't have recommended an EQ mount, rather this one instead: http://www.firstlightoptics.com/beginner-telescopes/skywatcher-heritage-130p-flextube.html

EDIT: I have the EQ mounted one and it's a real pain.

Edited by pipnina
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I wouldn't have recommended an EQ mount, rather this one instead: http://www.firstlightoptics.com/beginner-telescopes/skywatcher-heritage-130p-flextube.html

EDIT: I have the EQ mounted one and it's a real pain.

I was trying to suggest something that is similar to the OP scope.  Google throws up lots of images of a reflector on an EQ mount when you search for konusmotor 500. 

Can't see what the issue is with GEM's, they are only a pain to use if you don't understand the concept of their operation. However for a beginner an alt/az mount is simpler to use for basic operation

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I was trying to suggest something that is similar to the OP scope.  Google throws up lots of images of a reflector on an EQ mount when you search for konusmotor 500. 

Can't see what the issue is with GEM's, they are only a pain to use if you don't understand the concept of their operation. However for a beginner an alt/az mount is simpler to use for basic operation

As an owner of the EQ2 I can tell you it isn't very good.

1: The Declination slow mo runs out of turning- it stops after a while in either direction.

2: The declination gets really stiff at certain points and then pings forward 10 degrees if the lock is actually tght enough to use the slow-mo control.

3: Having to balance the scope again after moving to a different patch of sky is annoying.

4: Not possible to accurately polar align with the EQ2, nowhere to put a polar scope.

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Looking at the price stated above, you may be dissapointed.  The eyepieces and barlows will be Rubbish, and if it has a spherical mirror then that's not good either.  You may find that the higher magnification eyepieces give poor results and the focusing is hard to achieve..and forget using the 5x barlow... the result will be very blurred and dark on anything other than the moon.

You'll see the Moon, Disk of Jupiter and the four inner moons, although you won't get much detail, if any, and Saturn with the rings.  But the images will be small, don't expect to see large disks with lots of belt detail on Jupiter.

It's a shame you didn't come here before you purchased your scope.  For around the same sort of money you could of purchased a Skywatcher 130P (http://www.firstlightoptics.com/beginner-telescopes/skywatcher-explorer-130p.html) which IMO will be a better scope.

So many folk have said they browsed a  forum, bought their scope and then joined, only to find, what appears to be,  some negativity about the equipment just bought, and then the gut  feeling of have I done the right thing?

The scope in question is similar to my Celestron power-seeker, and if someone told me I was going to see a lot with it, I would have given up by now and started another hobby? In fact I did give up and ordered another scope after the  very first session?

I continued to try and improve things, but there is nothing extra I could do to better the system, there is just no comparison compared to what I have now, yet the first images of the Moon on the power-seeker were ok, that for me is about the limit of that scope for my eyes, from  my location. 

It stands to reason that folk  can, and do, make up their own minds,  but what if there was a text message in a header  on the site, some sort of extra encouragement to help  more folk  join first, ask questions and buy later! 

I'm in the process of  further shed clearance and rebuilding projects, and despite my offers in the past to anyone passing to a free telescope to try one out, and more so,  to compare the EQ set-up to a simple Dobsonian set-up, I think I'll be leaving the scope in the shed when it goes to the scrap compound? The scope is in good order, just not good quality.

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So many folk have said they browsed a  forum, bought their scope and then joined, only to find, what appears to be,  some negativity about the equipment just bought, and then the gut  feeling of have I done the right thing?

It's a public forum, and so any question such as that asked by the OP will result in replies with differeing opinions.  There have been lots of similar posts where people have purchased far worse scopes (seben come to mind) and found it was a pile of poo and want to know if there was anything they could do to improve the thing.  Assuming the OP's scope has a spherical similar to the Seben, then the same issues are likely.

My post wasn't trying to be negative, more realistic.  That site that Julian linked to is very useful in demonstrating the aperture and focal length of equipment required to see astronomical targets, but it also assumes that the optics and seeing conditions are perfect.  I entered  the details of my 200P with a 4x barlow and selected Jupiter as the target, and the result I got a few years back was no where near as bright and details as the example shown, although the image in the field of view was the same.  So even if you have a decent scope of the same spec as the OP telescope and select Jupiter in the settings of that site, you still end up with a small white disk for Jupiter.  If you then factor in a  spherical mirror and the artifacts a plossl eyepiece will have with that then there is a very good chance the OP will be dissapointed in the performance.

To the OP, I'm sorry if my comments have made you feel that you've done the wrong thing in purchasing the scope you have.  I don't know the circumstances behind the purchase, but it might be worth seeing if you can return the scope if you feel it's not up to your expectations when you get first opportunity to test it out.  Bottom line is that if you are happy with what you can see with it, then that's fine.  But you won't know how well your scope perfomes until you've had chance to compare it with other scopes, so it might be worth joining a local society or popping along to any public star party event they organise and have a look through other scopes by mainstream manufacturers.  Only then will you be able to make a definitive decission as to varifying what you have purchased is good or bad

Edited by malc-c
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malc-c.........I wasn't suggesting you were negative, that was not the intention, and your post was honest as the day is long,  I simply agreed with the comment you made....It's a shame you didn't come here before you purchased your scope  I actually liked your post...I just wish more folk would ask questions, before any potential  purchase, especially if  their knowledge in the subject is just starting out. I couldn't  just buy something, then ask how to use it or how good it should be, that to me is crazy!  I would/could do my homework first or simply ask the question, taking any pertinent information to make, possibly the right choice?

I was merely trying to elevate your comment?

I still stand by the fact that My Celestron is pants!

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what will your scope achieve?  It's probably more what you will achieve - how you will enjoy your time, develop your interests, look to other equipment and of course share your time with others either on this forum or at a club.  

Some interesting comments have been made as is the nature of this forum.:)

I for one look forward to your comments on your first session!

michael

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malc-c.........I wasn't suggesting you were negative, that was not the intention, and your post was honest as the day is long,  I simply agreed with the comment you made....It's a shame you didn't come here before you purchased your scope  I actually liked your post...I just wish more folk would ask questions, before any potential  purchase, especially if  their knowledge in the subject is just starting out. I couldn't  just buy something, then ask how to use it or how good it should be, that to me is crazy!  I would/could do my homework first or simply ask the question, taking any pertinent information to make, possibly the right choice?

I was merely trying to elevate your comment?

I still stand by the fact that My Celestron is pants!

Sorry - I misread the post as a contradiction rather than agreement - and thanks for your comments.  This sort of thing isn't just limited to astronomical equipment.  I frequent several forums covering my interests and it happens there too.  regretfully one forum covers keeping snakes and not doing research before purchasing there has far more consequences for the welbeing of the animal. -  It does seem strange that folk will purchase something and then ask questions on its use or how best to keep it as part of researching - often to find that they've got things wrong.

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Welcome saggiemaggie7.

Your first telescope well be a start to seeing so much more.

A low powered view can be very rewarding, it is not always good took chase magnification as the image might get bigger but it will be dimmer and blurry. The 17mm and 22mm I think will give the best view.

Stellarium is a great free software to tell you about what is up there, and if in the northern hemisphere turn left at Orion is a great book.

Start with the moon and some open clusters like m44.

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Small World Malcolm? Ive been studying the Corn Snake for several years now, and hope to keep one for a good many Years, given the right care, handling and diet, and all my suppliers are local to me. No specialist suppliers, no snake!

My new office/workshop is the preferred environment ( kept away from the Mrs!) after I have averaged and tested the lowest temperature the building will reach during the Winter Months, I dont want a stark difference between room temp and the temp of the terrarium, But thats another thread?

I'm also considering a modification to another shed today, in order to store my scope outside, reducing or requiring no cooling time, for that grab & go session!

Edited by Charic
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Hi saggiemaggie7 and indeed welcome to the forum. I'll not get into the above negativity debate, but I am guessing that given the large array of eyepieces and barlows that you have with it, and not knowing quite what it is capable of, I'm guessing you may have bought the scope/setup 2nd hand. 

I bought an oldish mustard yellow 2nd hand Konus 500 at a price that was hard to refuse. It had been used successfully, amongst other things for solar observation using a custom made (and very competently so) solar filter. It had also been used in a school astronomy club. I was surprised how well made it was and not at all a poor cousin of a Celestron/Skywatcher as I had supposed. The focuser is a simple rack and pinion but works well enough, and it holds its collimation well. I Have absolutely no idea whether it has a spherical or parabolic primary mirror, I cannot find any definitive comments but from the acceptable views I have had with it, given its an F4.38 scope I'd guess the latter. My expectations of it were not high but I've had pleasing views of star clusters and good views of the moon. Looking at Jupiter, though small in the viewfinder, the cloud bands can be discerned and it Galilean moons. Using a low power EP for big wide field views tends to give poor contrast the 22mm might be similar. At the other end, the 4mm will give 125x which  is as far as I would push it. Only by trying it out will you know how it will perform and how pleasing or not you will find it.

Regarding the mount - an equatorial mount takes some fathoming when you are new, and many beginners scopes are under-mounted  but the small 500 on the EQ2 should be fine. Again, you will get to know its benefits and its weaknesss. If you are fortunate enough to live somewhere with dark skies, weather permitting,  just get it set up and see what there is to see. The leaning curve as a beginner can feel a little steep, but with patience and perseverance it becomes a worthwhile absorbing hobby!  

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...any negativity, applied or assumed means diddly squat when you read stuff like this...........tbh i dont even know where i was pointing i was pointing south as polaris was behind me thats the best i can tell you ohhhh it is exciting  :) [sic] after discovering a misty patch?

Therefore the system is working for saggiemaggie7 ( its just a pity your not certain what you found?  ) but look again next time, and if your not already using it, grab yourself a FREE copy of Stellarium, and make the comparison?

The  need to drop the  assumptions  of negativity is now, as the thought above was a non-starter, as you can read in the replies. 

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It's a shame the OP's question has been overshadowed by the negative comments from people who have never used the scope. Perhaps there is a lesson there as to when you shouldn't comment ;)

There's a review of this scope on Cloudy Nights from someone who has actually used it; the review seems quite favourable and mentions pin point stars and a clear view of Saturn's Cassini division. Not bad for such an inexpensive scope.

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I have this very scope and it was the first 'proper' telescope I bought. I can still remember how I felt on my my first view of the Orion nebula and Saturn through this telescope. I was blown away !

Use it, enjoy the views and relish the feeling; you will always remember them ! :)

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There is the standard http://www.12dstring.me.uk/fov.htm just enter your scope\ep etc, select your target & off u go....

This is a great site for giving you an idea what your field of view will be. I.e. How much sky each eyepiece will show with your scope. But the images used are long exposure photographs and nothing like what you will actually see with your own eyes through any telescope.

500mm is good widefield focal length so you should get nice views of star fields, open clusters and if your sky is dark enough even some of the brighter galaxies and larger nebulae. I doubt you will need to use the Barlow lenses or the filters if they are just colour filters. Your telescope should also give good views of the moon. I haven't seen a photograph yet that comes close to matching the contrast and detail visible in the eyepiece of even a modest telescope.

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Folks with expensive equipment can forget just how much people can do with cheap equipment in almost any area of endeavour. very few will want to invest £££ when they aren't even sure what they will make of a hobby. For me a £70 scope from Lidl provided the encouragement to get a bigger scope, and the OP's scope seems better than the one I got.

I'm sure that even the finder on this scope will be better than Galilleo's first scope, and when he looked at the milky way and saw it was just a mass of stars and discovered Jupiter had moons, humanities world-view changed.

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  • 3 weeks later...

hi guys id like to thank you all for your comments :) I've spent a bit of time playing with the mount and the scope done lots of research :) i think I've now got a good knowledge of how my mount works also with the scope over the past few weeks i have been really happy with what i have seen i have managed to catch a glimpse of a crescent Venus :) i also managed to see Mars and 1 of its moons i viewed the recent lunar eclipse very well with the scope i think or hope may be a better word i have chose the right scope as my first :) i am lucky enough to have a partner that loves me dearly and has just baught me a Cannon 1000D for my birthday so i think my next challenge will be to start and photograph some of the things i see 

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