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The Binocular Sky Newsletter, September2015


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September's Binocular Sky Newsletter is ready.

We have the usual overview of DSOs, variable and double stars and, as the nights get longer, more lunar occultations of bright stars, including a couple of grazes on the morning of the 5th as the Moon passes through the Hyades.
 

To grab your (free!) copy, head on over to http://binocularsky.com/ and click on the Newsletter tab.

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I took my 12 x 50 Optolyth binos to Portugal recently during our family holiday and I must admit that I learnt more about the night sky in a couple of sessions that I've done in years of using my bigger GOTO scopes.

I took Stephen Tonkins "Binocular Tour" with me from the August Sky at Night mag and managed to find most of the items plus lots of others.

GOTO's are a bit like SATNAV, they get you there but you can't remember the journey or the places enroute.

Don't get me wrong I'm not going to sell my scopes as they have their advantages it's just that I'm going to use my binos more often.

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