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mrfishyfingers

Using Integrating Video Camera with unguided Dobsonian

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Morning/Afternoon/Evening all.

Forgive what may seem to be a wet-behind-the-ears question, but I would appreciate some advice on the following.

I have a Sky-Watcher 200P 8 inch Dobsonian, not a GOTO or guided version, and am routinely able to see many deep sky objects in my back garden in the North of England. I would love to use this scope to do some basic imaging with, nothing too fancy or time-consuming needing loads and loads of processing time for a final image.

I have noticed that there are a number of Integrating Video Cameras that seem to fit the bill on the market and I am considering maybe taking the plunge and getting myself one. Before I do, I just wanted to canvas opinion as to whether using one of these cameras with an unguided Dobsonian such as mine would actually produce meaningful results.

I would be intending to fit the camera directly into the focuser and notice that some reflectors may not enable the camera to focus properly without some kind of adaptor. Some manufacturers seem to offer such an adaptor with their cameras, others don't. My other question would be whether my telescope would require something like this to enable the camera to focus properly. Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

Many thanks,

Simon

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To add to the above, am I right in thinking to get a larger or magnified image from a camera placed directly into the focuser I could use it in conjunction with a Barlow lens? Or are these cameras capable of zooming images independently?

Thanks again.

Simon

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Hi, you will be able to use the cams OK with your reflector. To attach the camera you will need a C mount eyepiece adapter then slide in just like an eyepiece. No lens used.

The cameras act similar to a 6mm eyepiece so do magnify. That said you will be fairly limited on dsos with no driven mount but fine on planets and moon. A Barlow wil work fine as well but you will need to keep up with the objects moving.

Reflectors generally do not have enough in focus for reducers which would give you longer exposures for dsos but it has been done. If that's any help.

Carl

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Check my recent videos on my Nytecam Channel on YouTube. I demo DSO capture with a static telescope using the SX Lodestar in auto-stack mode it works :-)

Nytecam

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Here's the direct link ...

but forget the Barlow [too much strain on the scope] and preferably use a focal reducer [to speed up the optics] and minimise tracking errors on faint DSOs ;-)

Nytecam

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Been looking at the Astro-Video Systems cameras, one of which was reviewed very favourably in a recent copy of Astronomy Now. Their website includes a gallery of images captured using one of their cameras in 4" and 6" unguided scopes without any processing. This is the kind of thing I would be looking for, something fairly basic that produces decent images of the planets and DSO's that I am able to look at through the eyepiece. My only real concern was that the camera might not be able to achieve focus with my 8" Dobsonian.

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If you just want a "live view" instead of an eyepiece view, why not?

Who could dislike (in some ways) a 2x plus increased aperture...  :p

I think, if you have a sufficiently large field and a sufficiently small object, it's

quite possible to image with a *static* scope! What constitutes "sufficiently",

I haven't personally tried! But certainly some stacking programs (Registax)

will cope with objects that move considerably across the field of view. Some

cope with field rotation (Deep Sky Stacker). Whether such ideas are viable,

is for experiment? But all sorts of odd ideas can be "worth a go" in VA. :)

Edited by Macavity
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Hello Simon,

Firstly, I must say I do hope you either sell chips or you are a fisherman  :grin:

There are many good cameras out there that will do the job but have a look at this new one from Altair Astro http://www.altairastro.com/xcms_entry.php?xcmsentryid=20 This to me looks like a great starter camera for VA and I'm thinking of getting one myself.

Either-way you will love video astronomy so welcome and have fun!

Best wishes

Karl

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Here's the direct link ...https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Un8sGf-Pwoobutforget the Barlow [too much strain on the scope] and preferably use a focal reducer [to speed up the optics] and minimise tracking errors on faint DSOs ;-)Nytecam

Are you deliberately contradicting my advice?? What sort of reducer with the posters suggested camera do you use with your reflector??

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can vou explain how the software works//bit confused by the video 8 seconds to 20 seconds on an static scope on a deep sky object and get sharp images.

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AVS sells an "infocus" adapter which allows it's camera to go further into the focuser by an inch or so. I use one with my DSO-1 when using exstreme reduction in my 4.3" refractor, works well.

They are really made for reflectors, so if you have a 2" focuser it should work if you do not have enough "in" focus. Works with any camera that uses the DSO-1 type body. Also the varioreducer AVS sells works with it. 

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