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Allright, it's been a year since I last posted (or something like that), and I just so happened to stop by SGL to see if there were any good shots of Perseids...

Even though I've considered my efforts in imaging these a failure - I thought I might contribute with an image taken with the main imaging cam, and a timelapse of the imaging session.

I imaged over the course of two hours between 00:00 and 02:00 - which I estimated to be the darkest period of the night, peaking at the darkest at 01:00.

A single meteorite against a Milkyway backdrop:

Perseids /fail

A timelapse of the imaging session:

https://youtu.be/BS0yF0bP4_o

As you can see, there is quite a bit of clouds. My image above is the only one in which there are "not too many clouds". I even had to crop out the worst of it.

Main imaging camera:

Modified and cooled Canon EOS 600D running at  -13°c in ambient temperature of 10°c on a Vixen Polarie - imaging through a 14mm Samyang wide-angle lens at F2.4 ISO 400, 90sec exposure.

Timelapse camera:

Canon EOS 7D Mark II on tripod, imaging through a Sigma 10-20mm at F3.5, ISO 1600, 15sec exposures.

Timelapse images edited in Adobe Lightroom CC, main image edited in Ligthroom and Photoshop.

Sincerely, Alveprinsen.

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Not a total failure - you caught one!

Good to see you on here again. Norway must be keeping you very busy...

Love the time lapse. I tried to make one of the Perseids too. The time lapse worked, but I found that it isn't an ideal way to capture meteorites, which are very brief, so speeding up their existence makes them almost impossible to see! I do like all the planes and satellites zipping about the skies though. Very much like the people and head lamps busying about in your sequence.

Take care and fingers crossed for a good winter of imaging!

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...Love the time lapse. I tried to make one of the Perseids too. The time lapse worked, but I found that it isn't an ideal way to capture meteorites, which are very brief, so speeding up their existence makes them almost impossible to see! I do like all the planes and satellites zipping about the skies though. Very much like the people and head lamps busying about in your sequence.

Take care and fingers crossed for a good winter of imaging!

The time-lapse wasn't really meant to catch any meteorites. That was the main imaging camera's job. The time-lapse was more for showing friends "we were here, this is what we did..." :)

I feel the sky is by far not dark enough yet to take any meaningfull images. In the timelapse you can see the light in the horizon the entire time. Another month or two though, and things are going to look dimmer - in a positive sense. :D

I hope I get more windows of no moon, no wind, no clouds this season, but I'm not holding my breath.

Last year I got so fed up with having so few imaging sessions pr. year I started a new hobby that does not require clear skies, no moon AND no wind: genetics & molecular biology. I'm setting up a fully functional DNA research lab in my former bedroom... ;) See www.drn00b.com for details.. haha! :D

Edited by Alveprinsen

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Too hard on yourself. This is a good capture. Thanks for posting.

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Astrophotography is never a failure, you may fail to capture what you went to see, but quality time with good friends, doing something that you enjoy is totally priceless - if it was easy it would not be a challenge, it's what makes it fun and motivates us to get out, making the successes that much better :) 

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Great shot, awesome background, 100% agree with your above statement.  My astrophotography is currently at a fun dumb luck stage.  During Perseids I shot 300 images at 50mm (thought it was set to 16mm) / f5.6 (thought I had it on f3.5) / 20sec (thought I had it set at 30sec (thats 75mm with my crop cam) and managed to luck bucket a sweet zoomed in meteor.

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