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m13 help


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Been trying a few times now to spot m13 cluster, even after referring to 'turn left at orion' and a sky guide app but I cannot seem to locate it with my skyliner 200p. I'm finding the Hercules constellation ok with the finderscope and a 25mm ep but can't finder m13.. I've tried 12mm and 8mm ep's with No joy.. What should I be trying to spot it with please anyone!,,

Thanks

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Sargey, get an old-fashioned star chart, orient yourself to the sky, find Eta and Zeta Herculis and you're almost there. M13 is between these stars, but closer to Eta. I would use a longer focal length eyepiece (like your 25mm) to scan the area between these two stars until you spot the little fuzzy glob. How is the seeing in your area? I live in the city but have no trouble with it, and with Hercules being overhead at this time, you won't get any of that nasty atmospheric turbulence in the way. M13 is one of my favorites! I make it a staple whenever I have clear nights this time of year. 

http://earthsky.org/tonight/two-stars-lead-to-constellation-hercules

Hope this helps,

Reggie

Edited by orion25
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If you have found Hercules, you can pick out the square, then get some binoculars and view along each side of the square and on one of the sides there will be a fuzzy patch. That's it.

It is easier to do it this way as it is easier then trying to identify whatever the 2 star designations are.

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Thanks reggie, I did in fact see a fuzzy globe at one point but wasn't sure if that was it and lost sight of it.. Live in Cornwall with very little light pollution, will take your advice and use 25mm to try and find it again, I think I kept changing the ep's too soon without really knowing which one to stick with, appreciate the response! Probably reduce the ale intake before going out next time too :-)

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Thanks reggie, I did in fact see a fuzzy globe at one point but wasn't sure if that was it and lost sight of it.. Live in Cornwall with very little light pollution, will take your advice and use 25mm to try and find it again, I think I kept changing the ep's too soon without really knowing which one to stick with, appreciate the response! Probably reduce the ale intake before going out next time too :-)

You're most welcome. Haha, yeh, reduce the ale and go for the globe! :laugh:  It's easier to find M13 with a wider field EP and looks magnificent in a starry background. I'd start out with the 25mm and once you got it in your sights, you can ramp up the mag for a closer look. You're lucky to have little LP. You should have an awesome view of M13. My largest scope right now is my Orion 180 Mak-Cass and it really sparkles, like a cluster of jewels spilling out into the cosmos!

I'll be out there tonight looking at it. Will you join me, my friend?  :smiley:

Cheers,

Reggie

Edited by orion25
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 M13 is one of my favorites! I make it a staple whenever I have clear nights this time of year. 

http://earthsky.org/tonight/two-stars-lead-to-constellation-hercules

Hope this helps,

Reggie

me too its my favorite glob and so easy to find even with my little 130p and horrendous light polution :)

just need a bigger dob so i can resolve it more :(

Edited by Ju Piter
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Yep, M13 is great. Last night it was resolving right to the core in my 10" under fairly average conditions.

Once you find it, under your skies it should be lovely in your 8". It will take magnification well, so once you e found it in a low power eyepiece, up the mag and the stars should star resolving. Averted vision also helps, they almost sparkle when you flick your eye away from the centre.

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had a solid view of m13 yesterday in my 127 mak. not resolving, but definite grainyness to it...

tonight it was the clouds...so no go, unfortunately.

wonder what omega centauri is like...visited southern hemisphere but did not have chance to have a look.

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I'm pretty sure I spotted it tonight but not totally convinced.. Was a misty glob but couldn't spot it at all with the finder scope..skies seemed pretty clear for a while.. Used 25mm ep then the 18mm, tried a 7mm but was just a fainter mist, couldn't see that it was stars though. Am I expecting too much?. Or was I on NGC 6207? Anyone have any photos of the m13 through there 200p or similar.. So I can see what to expect...

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I'm pretty sure I spotted it tonight but not totally convinced.. Was a misty glob but couldn't spot it at all with the finder scope..skies seemed pretty clear for a while.. Used 25mm ep then the 18mm, tried a 7mm but was just a fainter mist, couldn't see that it was stars though. Am I expecting too much?. Or was I on NGC 6207? Anyone have any photos of the m13 through there 200p or similar.. So I can see what to expect...

I think you've found it. In a 200P you will not see the level of detail that you would with a much larger scope. The trick is to get the focus as good as you can by using some of the surrounding stars and then sit for a long time (20 minutes) at the eyepiece to allow your eyes to adjust and the detail of the object to come to you.

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Here is a link to a sketch of M13 made (not by myself) when observing with a Skyliner 200P newtonian at 48x magnification:

http://www.darkskytelescopehire.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2013/04/M13-Owain-John1-e1367230822588.jpg

You can see that the edges of the "blob" are resolved into points of light. You should see this with your scope under reasonably dark skies.

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Silly question I know, but a couple of you have mentioned the m13 'resolving' um not sure what you mean by that sorry!!! could you explain,, sorry guys...

Sargey, as John mentions, resolving just means that rather than seeing a smooth blob which gets brighter towards the centre, you are able to pick out the individual stars which make up the globular. This may mean that you can just begin to see stars around the edges, or with a big scope under good skies you can pick out stars right into the centre; resolved to the core. I'm sure your scope should be capable of this with more magnification.

EDIT oh, and no need for an apology, it's a very good question!!

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Yep that was it John.. So I just need to give it a bit more time at the eyepiece.. Think the explanation of what I would see in 'turn left at orion' is a little ambitious so I was expecting to see something stronger... Not totally disappointed though as sitting in my little garden in Cornwall gazing up at the stars and managing to locate something 25000 light years away is still mind blowing. Thanks for all the help people.. SGL is almost as good as actual stargazing

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Could consider a Telrad if you have not already got one.  These are a big help in the 1st step of aiming, followed by the finder view aiming then bang in the middle of the eyepiece view it should be there.....As long as you have some practice and set it all up properly :)

Glad you are enjoying those lovely Cornish skies. 

Edited by jabeoo1
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You're obviously on the right track, as a newcomer one of the problems is knowing just what to expect.

The quality of the skies make a huge difference, not just the amount of light pollution but the actual transparency of the sky itself.

Good luck and clear skies.

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