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a10ken

scope suitability question

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Hi folks, I have been looking at trying VA, I have a OrionOptics uk vx10l newt @f6.3 and a orionoptics uk omc140, of these two scopes which would be more sutable.

ta

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Both have there uses depending on the target.

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visual and imaging, using a video cam to record and stack images, viewing dso,s etc,etc

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Hiya

I use my OO UK Vx10 (F4.8) and it's great for a broad spectrum of objects to observe using EAA.

I think both your scopes will serve for the job - as long as you can mount them on a tracking mount I should think you will be good to go!

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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Video imaging can benefit from fast optics. On the other hand, my f/4 Newt is

"twice as challenging" re. collimation as an f/6 Newt. The sheer "grunt power"

of significant aperture: 10" - Effectively "doubled or tripled" re. ability to image

objects of faint magnitudes, via video astronomy, is always a winner tho! :D

If there is sufficient in-focus, you can always try a modest 0.7x focal reduction

to get from f/6 to f/4. But I found such things a bit marginal? lol. However, your

slower (but enviable quality!) OMC140 like most "cats" has significant potential

(available in-focus) for rather more significant focal reduction experiments... 

With smaller video chips, the (now deleted) Celestron-style 0.3x focal reducer

becomes a distinct possibility for us. Taking my own MAK150 from f/12 to f/4 or

faster, significantly brightens the image and (obviously) increases field of view!

It is always useful to have a longer native focal length for small DSO's though...

These tend (conveniently!) to have rather higher surface brightness too. :)

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excellent reply mac, I am looking into (no pun intended) a AVS dso-1 camera with an AVS vareoreducer, do you have an opinion on these. 

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excellent reply mac, I am looking into (no pun intended) a AVS dso-1 camera with an AVS vareoreducer, do you have an opinion on these. 

I have that combo, to see what it can do compared to other camera's you can look at my gallery. http://stargazerslounge.com/gallery/member/40780-f15p5/

If I had to do it over again i would have gone with the AVS Mk4 which has many advantages, lower noise, no or few warm pixels more gain, no amp glow. However the DSO-1 is a good starter camera for doing both dso's and planets/moon if your on a tight budget.

Richard Whalen

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