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Piero

Four open clusters in Cygnus

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After seeing the conjunction Venus - Jupiter, the sky was slowly but constantly becoming cloudy. So I turned my telescope at Cygnus. The sky there was clear and the region was the least affected by the Moon brightness. 

Cygnus (Cyg) is one of the best summer constellation and is full of treasures to discover and see. Last night I chose to observe some open cluster located on the "Cygnus body" near Sadr (Gamma Cyg). I attached my report for these targets. 


Thanks for reading, 

Piero



Seeing: 3 - Moderate seeing

Transparency: 4 - Partly clear

Telescopes: Tele Vue 60 F6

Eyepieces: Nagler 13mm giving 28x, 2.2mm ex. pup., and 2.80 degrees


NGC6910 (Cyg, Opn CL)

From Deneb (Alpha), I moved to Sadr (Gamma). This open cluster is on the line between these two stars, but on the side of Sadr. Its size is only 8', but is sufficiently bright (magnitude 7.4, surface brightness 11.7). It is formed by few bright stars and I could count about 7-8 dim stars. Apparently, many of these stars are variable. Very beautiful to me. 


M29 (Cyg, Opn CL)

Cooling Tower. From Sadr (Gamma), this cluster is East - South-East. The main six stars forming a little tower, or an academic hat, were easily visible. No dim star was detectable likely due to the Moon. This is a nice cluster which might be interesting to see at higher power (e.g. 51x). 


IC4996 or Cr418 (Cyg, Opn CL)

From M29, I moved South. This is a quite small open cluster which is detectable at this low power, but would benefit of higher power. It is on a separate star near three pairs of aligned stars. Three - four stars were detectable apart from the main one.


NGC6883 or Cr415 (Cyg, Opn CL)

From IC4996, I moved South, using as a reference a group of stars reminding me of a pan and a long handle. NGC6883 is located below a line of 3 stars. It is quite easy to find. There are lovely double stars in this area, and in this beautiful little cluster. I counted 3-4 pairs forming this cluster. All these are well separated at 28x. Beautiful.

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great report mate,i really enjoyed reading,all i got lastnight was the moon with the clouds it was nice.thanks for sharing..charl..

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Great report Piero! I was observing 3 of these 4 myself last week (with the Lodestar). For many of these its the combination of bright stars against the milky way star field that makes them special, to me. The foreground stars of the Crescent Nebula region (NGC 6888) are also worth a look.

Martin

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Great report Piero! I was observing 3 of these 4 myself last week (with the Lodestar). For many of these its the combination of bright stars against the milky way star field that makes them special, to me. The foreground stars of the Crescent Nebula region (NGC 6888) are also worth a look.

Martin

Thanks Martin! I also love that region of sky for similar reasons as yours. The richness of the Milky Way in the background is just fantastic!  

I am looking forward to seeing some nebulae in Cygnus with my OIII filter, but unfortunately the sky still gets dark quite late here and the Moon was almost full yesterday. However, I will certainly have a look at those (and the Crescent Nebula if I can) in July and August.

Best, Piero 

Edited by pdp10

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Super report, if you get to a dark site, Cygnus is just packed with the puffs of clusters by eye. In addition the wide Milky Way winds , splits and goes black in this stunning area,

Nick.

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Very interesting report well written. I like to spend some time in this area too, but clouds have limited my observing for almost all of the month of June

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