Jump to content

Stargazers Lounge Uses Cookies

Like most websites, SGL uses cookies in order to deliver a secure, personalised service, to provide social media functions and to analyse our traffic. Continued use of SGL indicates your acceptance of our cookie policy.

stargazine_ep25_banner.thumb.jpg.9e57eee22cad68fd6b67a87befeaa79b.jpg

Recommended Posts

Can I see any galaxys or nebula with celestron 15x70 skymaster binoculars if so where can I see them thanks as I am just amateur and finding it hard to find them

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Galaxies with the exception on M31, I suspect not.

Bino are better suited to larger brighter objects, especially open clusters. Open clusters look great in Binos.

Ant

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have seen many galaxies with my older BA-1 15x70 binoculars (same as Celestron Skymaster). M81 and M82 are quite easy, M33 and M51 are also fairly straightforward, M101 is possible, but only under good conditions. NGC 2903, M65 and M66 should be possible as well. Many others are also within reach (but of course not as good as in bigger scopes)

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

M81 and M 82 are worth a go. M51 is also doable under a dark aky

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi,

I have the same binoculars and they are indeed great for the brighter star clusters and nebulae (i.e., M42) but you will struggle with galaxies, especially from light-polluted skies. I have managed to spot M51, though it was only a faint fuzzy blob. And looking low in the south at this time of year in the early hours, you should be able to make out M11 (the Wild Duck cluster), and possibly M16 and M17 (as faint blobs) - I know I did last year.

If you have access to a computer or tablet, load up the planetarium software Stellarium (http://www.stellarium.org/). You can set the date/time, zoom in/out, etc. I used this extensively when I started out with my bins. It helped to star-hop around the sky and identify many objects.

Best of luck.

John

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a set of 20x90 bins and M31 is about the only galaxy i can even start to see and its just a smudge. M42 is a great nebula in bins but again small.

Clusters such as M44,M45 and the double in Perseus etc look fantastic in bins.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am really puzzled at people saying only M31 is visible (although it is one of the easiest, I agree). A decent pair of 10x50s will show M81, M82, M33, M51 in my suburban garden, and even M101 can be spotted on exceptionally clear nights. They do remain smudges with little or no structure. From down-under  I spotted the LMC and SMC (easy-peasy, naked eye) and M83 (hard) and NGC 5128 (Cen A) using my old 15x70s. The LMC cannot be held in a single FOV :D and shows the Tarantula Nebula brilliantly. Back on the subject of M31: M32 and M110 can also be spotted in 15x70 bins. M110 is easier because it is distinctly non stellar, whereas M32 can appear as a fuzzy star.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yep about 30 galaxies visible to 50mm bins at a dark site in the northern hemisphere...At least 100 with big bins..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

But only with patience averted vision and the binoculars on a tripod and clear astronomically dark skies and a good atlas!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

But only with patience averted vision and the binoculars on a tripod and clear astronomically dark skies and a good atlas!

I rarely use a tripod, but in that sense too I am WEIRD :D

After 36 years of observing patience and averted vision do become second nature. I sometimes forget that

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Agreed. M31 is certainly the easiest and a great starter point. M33 is often easier with 10x50's than a 10" Dob!!

But. They don't jump out at you. They take practice, some time and the right conditions.

The OP did also mention Nebulea. At this time year M27 (Dumbell), M16 (Eagle) and M17 (Swan or Omega) are all doeable in your Binos. I got all of these in from my ruralish back garden late last night.

Paul

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Globulars are also nice targets with 15x70s I find. Plenty of those around in the summer skies (M13, M22, and M92 are amongst my favourites)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The essential thing, with trying to spot faint targets with reasonably high powered binoculars, such as the many already mentioned, is good dark skies. It is a question of "have binoculars and star maps will travel" If you are content just to observe from home were there is light pollution, then the chances of success are very much reduced :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The essential thing, with trying to spot faint targets with reasonably high powered binoculars, such as the many already mentioned, is good dark skies. It is a question of "have binoculars and star maps will travel" If you are content just to observe from home were there is light pollution, then the chances of success are very much reduced :)

Very important point. One of the big advantages of binoculars is of course that they travel well. I could easily take my bins to South Africa and Australia, but not my C8

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Download Stellarium (free) on the PC or at cost on App or even better SkySafari for your mobile device (on OSX or Android) - It costs some money but is well worth it IMHO beats Stellarium hands down.  Using one of these apps it is a breeze to see what's in the sky at the time and show objects you're interested in.   The Messier 110 list is a great place to start with binoculars - in theory all would be possible from a dark enough site.

The issue with binoculars if there is any real light pollution the exit pupil of binoculars is sufficiently large that you lose contrast which hurts being able to see the DSO at all.  I have plenty of galaxies with my Celestron 15x70s including quite a few of the Virgo / Coma Berenice's cluster.

Nebulae - well there's no shortage at the moment to see with Sagittarius and Scorpio now well visible - always going to be relatively low down but this is truly wonderful region to view.  M8 Lagoon Nebula is very bright and easy to spot as is Omega (Swan), some of the others will need more work and a darker site.  There's a whole bunch of globular clusters around that area to observe.  A tripod is a must have - These bins weigh too much to hold up for a good length of time and will also allow you keep the bins in once position while studying the star-chart.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Taking matters to the extreme, for all of you who did not know, we now have the 3rd darkest International sky sight in the World, virtually sat on our door step in Ireland. Some 700sq km known as the Ring of Kerry, in the South West of the county, was awarded the status by the International Dark-sky Association in 2014. So there you have it, subject for a not all that expensive break, take your binoculars, tripod and associated star maps with you and enjoy :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Take your camara, golf clubs and a thirst for the black stuff as well.

Paul

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I live in LA, very light polluted, and I found literally every DSO I looked for with 10x50's. The KEY is having a very good stable tri-pod, and a very detailed sky atlas. Don't even try using binoculars without a tri-pod is my advice. Find a nice sturdy one with a pistol-head grip for $80 and you'll be set, and grab a copy of the Pocket sky Atlas which works very well with binoculars. I was finding mag ~9 stuff at the zenith in LA. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.