Jump to content

sgl_imaging_challenge_2021_annual.thumb.jpg.3fc34f695a81b16210333189a3162ac7.jpg

Recommended Posts

On 22/11/2017 at 15:37, Sky-J said:

I love binocular astronomy, a great way to start any session and I always travel with at least one pair.

Here are some of my faves:

  • Canon is 10x30 (most used)
  • Canon IS 15x50
  • APM ED APO 10x50 (amazing glass!)
  • Nikon 8x42
  • WW2 Canadian 8x50
  • Celestron 10x42 (surprisingly good!)

IMG_0295.jpg

Hello. How would you rate the IS models you have to the standard type. I note you say the Canon IS 10x30 are your most used. A step up when you compare with other 10x binos you have ?? 

Regarda. John 

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 262
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

Here is the pair of Vixen 81mm's (BT81S-A). Cheers, Steve

Those Vixens look absolutely superb Steve. Ive considered on more than one occasion selling up some gear and plumping for something like that. To date I've resisted, but must admit your setup has reig

OK enough about scopes already!!!!!!!!. I know most of us have at least one set of bins which we keep by our side while out observing (usually 10x50). Binocular astronomy is and always has been my 1st

Posted Images

  • 2 months later...

I recently bought a Celestron 25x70 binocular, After not being able to focus through the Strathspey, These seemed very well colimated and lovely and bright (Still wish i'd brought the 100mm Strathspey home with me though! :hmh: )

ZpCaDQC.jpg

 

A Japanese CitatioN 8x30 binocular that I picked up today at a local St Lukes hospice charity shop for £8, They quite nice and bright, Made in Japan..

CckCtIF.jpg

B8qOwe1.jpg

j4GUIqn.jpg

UlXu8pg.jpg

 

 

Cheers, John :happy8:

 

 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Latest family portrait, now with the Helios LightQuest HR 16x80 replacing the Opticron 16x80 Observation binoculars. 

IMG_20180325_132200.thumb.jpg.6372681a1237078beb300112e7ad6d7d.jpg

Also shown are the TS 15x70 (BA-1), old Yashica-built CombiFOTO 7x50, Vixen New Foresta 10x56 roof prism bins, my old Bresser 10x50s and the little Lunt 8x32 SUNoculars.

  • Like 5
Link to post
Share on other sites

Here's my two pairs. My Opticron 7x36  BGA which I bought about 30 years ago and their recent replacement the excellent Opticron 8x42 DBA  VHD bought from FLO.

15219955077771621771853.thumb.jpg.79f0b7a563509bcbce8776674fb8c7ef.jpg

15219954752221622129544.thumb.jpg.5a343935a74882d51721c3afe3a55fd6.jpg

  • Like 5
Link to post
Share on other sites

Main Stable (i.e. stuff I use regularly):

20180326_114446.thumb.jpg.ef7cdecb1bf28aa19c760ad566cb0d1a.jpg

From the back, L-R: Miyauchi Bj-100 (my most used astro instrument by a long way), Lunt Magnesium 16x70 (quick & easy grab-and-go on a monopod), Lunt Magnesium 10x50 (my brightest hand-held bino)

Strathspey Marine 10x50 (robust, abused, live in the car), Opticron BGA 10x42 (lovely quality, small & light enough to be a "holiday" binocular when space/weight is tight), Vixen SG 6.5x32 ED (stunning image, now my favourite hand-held bino), Vixen SG 2.1x42 (magnificent under a very dark sky).

Outreach bins (used for teaching, outreach, etc.):

20180326_115624.thumb.jpg.7ecf3d9836217b62357de5c64618e9ce.jpg

From the back, L-R: Opticron Oregon 20x80 (recently acquired for outreach project; also used for teaching; OK on monopod or Skymount/Paragon parallelogram), Revelation Astro 15x70 (BA-1 variant, used for teaching, and as a "loan" instrument), Unbranded (well, would you want your name on something like this?) 12-60x70 zoom with the "latest ruby coatings"  (the result of a manufacturer stooping to the challenge: "Just how bad can a binocular be for £79?"; used for teaching/warning)

Opticron Adventurer T 8x42 WP (Used for outreach; the result of a manufacturer rising to the challenge: "Just how good can a binocular be for £79?"; I recently acquired a bunch of these for an outreach project), Vortex Raptor 6.5x32 (used for teaching & visiting grandchildren), No-name plastic-lensed Galilean type 4x20 (used for teaching, mostly to demonstrate that two of Jupiter's Galilean moons can be visible with cheap toy binoculars; ridiculously narrow FoV)

 

 

Edited by BinocularSky
clarity & consistency
  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, BinocularSky said:

Main Stable (i.e. stuff I use regularly):

20180326_114446.thumb.jpg.ef7cdecb1bf28aa19c760ad566cb0d1a.jpg

From the back, L-R: Miyauchi Bj-100 (my most used astro instrument by a long way), Lunt Magnesium 16x70 (quick & easy grab-and-go on a monopod), Lunt Magnesium 10x50 (my brightest hand-held bino)

Strathspey Marine 10x50 (robust, abused, live in the car), Opticron BGA 10x42 (lovely quality, small & light enough to be a "holiday" binocular when space/weight is tight), Vixen SG 6.5x32 ED (stunning image, now my favourite hand-held bino), Vixen SG 2.1x42 (magnificent under a very dark sky).

Outreach bins (used for teaching, outreach, etc.):

20180326_115624.thumb.jpg.7ecf3d9836217b62357de5c64618e9ce.jpg

From the back, L-R: Opticron Oregon 20x80 (recently acquired for outreach project; also used for teaching; OK on monopod or Skymount/Paragon parallelogram), Revelation Astro 15x70 (BA-1 variant, used for teaching, and as a "loan" instrument), Unbranded (well, would you want your name on something like this?) 12-60x70 zoom with the "latest ruby coatings"  (the result of a manufacturer stooping to the challenge: "Just how bad can a binocular be for £79?"; used for teaching/warning)

Opticron Adventurer T 8x42 WP (Used for outreach; the result of a manufacturer rising to the challenge: "Just how good can a binocular be for £79?"; I recently acquired a bunch of these for an outreach project), Vortex Raptor 6.5x32 (used for teaching & visiting grandchildren), No-name plastic-lensed Galilean type 4x20 (used for teaching, mostly to demonstrate that two of Jupiter's Galilean moons can be visible with cheap toy binoculars; ridiculously narrow FoV)

 

 

Interesting collection. Strathspey Marine bins are excellent if a bit heavy. I have a 7x50 pair. What is the eye relief for 10x50 please?

Link to post
Share on other sites
17 hours ago, 25585 said:

Interesting collection. Strathspey Marine bins are excellent if a bit heavy. I have a 7x50 pair. What is the eye relief for 10x50 please?

I've not measured it but, with the eye-cups folded down, it's easily adequate for use with spectacles.

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 26/03/2018 at 17:12, 25585 said:

Interesting collection. Strathspey Marine bins are excellent if a bit heavy. I have a 7x50 pair. What is the eye relief for 10x50 please?

@BinocularSky has forgotten his early report on the 10x50's where he measured 14mm with doubt? read it here http://www.strathspey.co.uk/10x50rev.html

I had both the 7x50 and still have their 10x50's, the only reason I don't have the 7x50's is that the field of view is wider on my Helios 8x40 Natureport, otherwise they'd be part of my collection.

With my 10x50's I estimate the closest sharpest image is about 42 feet for my eyes, but beyond that,once set, there's no further adjustment required, great views. 

Although some binoculars report their eye relief, this short video goes some way to explain what eye relief, and  about getting your eye  in just the right place?

I've seen folk myself wearing glasses with the binocular eye cups fully extended and wondering how they manage? Check this out https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J0RCqpajMwA

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Charic said:

@BinocularSky has forgotten his early report on the 10x50's where he measured 14mm with doubt? read it here http://www.strathspey.co.uk/10x50rev.html

I had both the 7x50 and still have their 10x50's, the only reason I don't have the 7x50's is that the field of view is wider on my Helios 8x40 Natureport, otherwise they'd be part of my collection.

With my 10x50's I estimate the closest sharpest image is about 42 feet for my eyes, but beyond that,once set, there's no further adjustment required, great views. 

Although some binoculars report their eye relief, this short video goes some way to explain what eye relief, and  about getting your eye  in just the right place?

I've seen folk myself wearing glasses with the binocular eye cups fully extended and wondering how they manage? Check this out https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J0RCqpajMwA

Many thanks. 14mm is too short. I will look into the 10x50 waterproof cf model instead.

My best smaller bins are Swift Osprey 7.5x42. Eye relief of 19mm. Got several pairs and a Derby version which is IF instead. 80s Bk7 but the best Swifts I have owned.

Edited by 25585
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, 25585 said:

Many thanks. 14mm is too short. I will look into the 10x50 waterproof cf model instead.

My best smaller bins are Swift Osprey 7.5x42. Eye relief of 19mm. Got several pairs and a Derby version which is IF instead. 80s Bk7 but the best Swifts I have owned.

14mm and above is deemed  suitable for spectacle wearers.
With an apparent  difference of 5mm ( mentioned in Johns report )  he still finds them suitable whilst wearing glasses, as stated above, providing the eye guards are lowered.
I wear glasses too, but not when using binoculars.

When I compared the two Marine binoculars, the eye relief was not something that was apparently different going from 7 to 10x, only the field of view was different.

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 26/03/2018 at 13:25, BinocularSky said:

Main Stable (i.e. stuff I use regularly):

20180326_114446.thumb.jpg.ef7cdecb1bf28aa19c760ad566cb0d1a.jpg

From the back, L-R: Miyauchi Bj-100 (my most used astro instrument by a long way), Lunt Magnesium 16x70 (quick & easy grab-and-go on a monopod), Lunt Magnesium 10x50 (my brightest hand-held bino)

Strathspey Marine 10x50 (robust, abused, live in the car), Opticron BGA 10x42 (lovely quality, small & light enough to be a "holiday" binocular when space/weight is tight), Vixen SG 6.5x32 ED (stunning image, now my favourite hand-held bino), Vixen SG 2.1x42 (magnificent under a very dark sky).

Outreach bins (used for teaching, outreach, etc.):

20180326_115624.thumb.jpg.7ecf3d9836217b62357de5c64618e9ce.jpg

From the back, L-R: Opticron Oregon 20x80 (recently acquired for outreach project; also used for teaching; OK on monopod or Skymount/Paragon parallelogram), Revelation Astro 15x70 (BA-1 variant, used for teaching, and as a "loan" instrument), Unbranded (well, would you want your name on something like this?) 12-60x70 zoom with the "latest ruby coatings"  (the result of a manufacturer stooping to the challenge: "Just how bad can a binocular be for £79?"; used for teaching/warning)

Opticron Adventurer T 8x42 WP (Used for outreach; the result of a manufacturer rising to the challenge: "Just how good can a binocular be for £79?"; I recently acquired a bunch of these for an outreach project), Vortex Raptor 6.5x32 (used for teaching & visiting grandchildren), No-name plastic-lensed Galilean type 4x20 (used for teaching, mostly to demonstrate that two of Jupiter's Galilean moons can be visible with cheap toy binoculars; ridiculously narrow FoV)

 

 

So, you like Binoculars then, Steve?:grin::grin:

By comparison, I have this pair as recommended by your good self..Opticron Adventurer WPII and am very happy with them too☺

Dave

IMG_20171124_152756356.thumb.jpg.af31001494fbe23ac98b1b843e4e4f65.jpg

IMG_20171124_153056243.thumb.jpg.e3d7b59c9617973db4eb81c20f52ca04.jpg

IMG_20171124_153049888.thumb.jpg.f014279dc4a58a47bda7b4b70188c65b.jpg

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

My 15x70 Celestron Cavalry. Last night I have collimated it looking at Rigel. When it is in focus and stable on a tripod (although this one is very crappy and wiggly) it gives very beautiful images. I've also looked at the full moon but there was noticeable chromatic aberration around it. Green on one side and purple on the other. I'm guessing that is normal at this price point for doublet glass.

IMG_20180331_112846.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/26/2018 at 13:25, BinocularSky said:

Main Stable (i.e. stuff I use regularly):

20180326_114446.thumb.jpg.ef7cdecb1bf28aa19c760ad566cb0d1a.jpg

From the back, L-R: Miyauchi Bj-100 (my most used astro instrument by a long way), Lunt Magnesium 16x70 (quick & easy grab-and-go on a monopod), Lunt Magnesium 10x50 (my brightest hand-held bino)

Strathspey Marine 10x50 (robust, abused, live in the car), Opticron BGA 10x42 (lovely quality, small & light enough to be a "holiday" binocular when space/weight is tight), Vixen SG 6.5x32 ED (stunning image, now my favourite hand-held bino), Vixen SG 2.1x42 (magnificent under a very dark sky).

Outreach bins (used for teaching, outreach, etc.):

20180326_115624.thumb.jpg.7ecf3d9836217b62357de5c64618e9ce.jpg

From the back, L-R: Opticron Oregon 20x80 (recently acquired for outreach project; also used for teaching; OK on monopod or Skymount/Paragon parallelogram), Revelation Astro 15x70 (BA-1 variant, used for teaching, and as a "loan" instrument), Unbranded (well, would you want your name on something like this?) 12-60x70 zoom with the "latest ruby coatings"  (the result of a manufacturer stooping to the challenge: "Just how bad can a binocular be for £79?"; used for teaching/warning)

Opticron Adventurer T 8x42 WP (Used for outreach; the result of a manufacturer rising to the challenge: "Just how good can a binocular be for £79?"; I recently acquired a bunch of these for an outreach project), Vortex Raptor 6.5x32 (used for teaching & visiting grandchildren), No-name plastic-lensed Galilean type 4x20 (used for teaching, mostly to demonstrate that two of Jupiter's Galilean moons can be visible with cheap toy binoculars; ridiculously narrow FoV)

 

 

How do the little Vixen bins (on the bottom right of the 1st image) perform?. Been pondering buying a pair myself for some time. Probably as well as any Vixen product ive ever bought, im guessing.

Edited by LukeSkywatcher
Link to post
Share on other sites

There are other Kansai equivalents to the vixen, that even enable filters to be added (cheaper too). I made my own using some old Nikon digital camera multiplier lenses. Lying down, looking up with them there are definitely more stars about and you aren’t guessing where you’re looking.

 

Peter

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, LukeSkywatcher said:

How do the little Vixen bins (on the bottom right of the 1st image) perform?. Been pondering buying a pair myself for some time. Probably as well as any Vixen product ive ever bought, im guessing.

Lovely, but unlike anything else. They add a bit more than a magnitude of depth and I don't notice the magnification. It's sort of like counteracting LP a bit. @DirkSteele has written a comprehensive review of them.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

22 hours ago, Charic said:

@BinocularSky has forgotten his early report on the 10x50's where he measured 14mm with doubt? read it here http://www.strathspey.co.uk/10x50rev.html

 

Indeed he had forgotten this! Thanks. Must be 15 years old. Very odd that 19mm/14mm thing; the effect is certainly more like 19mm. Sometime (within the next 15 years? :D) I must figure out what's going on.

20 hours ago, 25585 said:

Many thanks. 14mm is too short. I will look into the 10x50 waterproof cf model instead.

See above (& the review) re 14mm/19mm; as I said earlier, fine with specs on. The WP CF model is OK (nice and sharp, less internally stopped than the Marine), but it does have annoying focus lag -- essentially, this is the waterproofing O-rings in the eyepiece tubes doing their job.

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, PeterW said:

There are other Kansai equivalents to the vixen, that even enable filters to be added (cheaper too). I made my own using some old Nikon digital camera multiplier lenses. Lying down, looking up with them there are definitely more stars about and you aren’t guessing where you’re looking.

 

Peter

True. Im thinking the Vixen will be expensive. Ive seen brands (cant remember which) selling for about 250.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I have just ordered these:

https://www.omegon.eu/instruments/omegon-2-1x42-wide-field-binoculars-for-star-field-observing/p,50354

Price is good and ive bought Omegon before.

I love binocular observing and i also love widefield observing. These bins will cover both. I have access to very dark skies 5 mins from home and the more portable the gear, the better.

Edited by LukeSkywatcher
Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, BinocularSky said:

Lovely, but unlike anything else. They add a bit more than a magnitude of depth and I don't notice the magnification. It's sort of like counteracting LP a bit. @DirkSteele has written a comprehensive review of them.

 

Here you go:  http://alpha-lyrae.co.uk/2014/10/25/vixen-sg-2-1x42-binoculars-review/

 

I love them.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 31/03/2018 at 19:22, 25585 said:

8.4mm eye relief.

That doesn't mean what most people think it does; I wrote about this in the Dec 2015 Binosky Newsletter:

The first thing to note is that this is not a prismatic binocular. It has Galilean optics, i.e. the same as an opera glass, but the similarity with common opera glasses stops there.The specified field of view and eye relief are essentially meaningless. With a Galilean optical system the exit pupil is virtual and resides between the objective and the eyepiece. In addition, the field of view increases as you bring your eyes closer to the eyepieces. This means that spectacle wearers will have a smaller field of view than those who do not wear them. I measured the true field of view to be 23° without spectacles and 17.4° with them, both larger than the specified 12.2°.

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.