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First Light- Dob 200p


astromackem
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Well I thought the cloud would scupper me but I peeped out and saw a few gaps so moved the scope out to cool then popped out 15 mins later.

I pointed at Jupiter using the 10mm stock lens -focussed and as soon as I saw the little white circle with 4 dots around it I knew I was watching Jupiter!! After a bit I just maybe made out two bands. I was maybe expecting the planet to be a bit bigger at 120x mag. What would be a realistic maximum to go to on Jupiter? Anywhere near 200x? I'm not sure I'd ever see the GRS at 120! 

It was the moons all in a line that has blown me away the most though -moreso than seeing Jupiter itself.

The cloud kept covering it every few mins- so was a bit frustrating for a first go but i enjoyed it.

I found it quite difficult to keep nudging the scope to keep it in view- im hoping I can improve on that. I keep nudging too much or not enough or in the wrong direction! And my neck hurts from twisting to look in the finder!

Also- im finding it really hard to keep both eyes open when looking in the EP- I keep getting too tempted to cover my other eye. Any tips on this?

All in all- an exciting first night out

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Congratulations on your 1st light with the new scope :smiley:

Learning to observe takes time and the more subtle details just don't jump out at you right away.

120x should show quite a bit of detail on Jupiter. When the seeing conditions are good you should find 150x up to around 180x good as well. More than that is generally not rewarding on Jupiter, unlike other targets such as Saturn and Mars which seem to "take" higher power better.

I keep my non observing eye closed when looking though a scope and always have done.

Each time you uses the scope you will learn more tricks and hone your technique :smiley:

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Congratulations on your new scope. My Skyliner is excellent, it has really exceeded my expectations.

I use an eye patch and hood to keep both eyes open and help with keeping stray light out of the eye at the EP.

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Congratulations on your new scope. My Skyliner is excellent, it has really exceeded my expectations.

I use an eye patch and hood to keep both eyes open and help with keeping stray light out of the eye at the EP.

Ah good idea. I could probably do with an eye patch as it gets annoying having to hold my eyelid down. My OH will think i'm going mad!

I think my scope needs collimating- so thats my next job.

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I usually end up wearing a thin fleece hat, so tend to pull this over my non observing eye. The alternative to an eye patch might be to tie on a bandanna and slip this over your eye (hmm might try this) - or is this getting into the realms of becoming even more weird.

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I usually end up wearing a thin fleece hat, so tend to pull this over my non observing eye. The alternative to an eye patch might be to tie on a bandanna and slip this over your eye (hmm might try this) - or is this getting into the realms of becoming even more weird.

At least I now know i'm not the only after-dark weirdo in Newcastle!

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At least I now know i'm not the only after-dark weirdo in Newcastle!

Exactly

Take yourself and your scope to one of Northumberland National Park's Dark Sky Park observing locations. This will completely transform your amateur astronomy experience. Exchange the neighbours for a Tawny owl or two.

Then you can wear what you like. Though be warned, I was at Cawfields on Hadrians Wall last night, a live web cam has recently been introduced - peeing in the toilet block is mandatory.

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Exactly

Take yourself and your scope to one of Northumberland National Park's Dark Sky Park observing locations. This will completely transform your amateur astronomy experience. Exchange the neighbours for a Tawny owl or two.

Then you can wear what you like. Though be warned, I was at Cawfields on Hadrians Wall last night, a live web cam has recently been introduced - peeing in the toilet block is mandatory.

Haha. I'd love to go up to Kielder but not sure the Mrs would be impressed!!

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Haha. I'd love to go up to Kielder but not sure the Mrs would be impressed!!

Then take her with you, the Autumn Kielder Star Camp that is, Wed 14 till Sun 18 Oct.

We have missed the last two, but the three of us expect to commit to this.

And if you are lucked out enthusing your Wife to go camping, there is a B&B in the village :smiley: 

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Then take her with you, the Autumn Kielder Star Camp that is, Wed 14 till Sun 18 Oct.

We have missed the last two, but the three of us expect to commit to this.

And if you are lucked out enthusing your Wife to go camping, there is a B&B in the village :smiley:

I'd love that. Sadly ive got two young kids. A family holiday with stuff for the kids to do or a nerdy star camp? Hmmm!

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Well I did a bit of collimation in the house then took it out afterwards and had a really good half hour or so.

Jupiter was that bit clearer and with some decent seeing could make out the two main bands quite nicely.

Also.. got my first look at the moon and wow it was stunning. Some superb detail even at just 48x- even better at 120x

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I view Jupiter with the stock 10 mm EP and a 3x Barlow. That's pretty much the limiting magnification. I find that my 2mm EP is just on the wrong side of the limit and it just gives fuzzy views. If the seeing is good then you should be able to see detail within the bands and the GRS should stand out clearly and well seperated from the band it nestles in with a thin creamy coloured border. A better EP, without the neeed for a Barlow, would possibly provide better detail but I find that seeing is the really dominant factor. Just wait for Saturn to be well positioned as that will blow your socks off. Igaven't done much in the way of binary splitting but the double-double in Lyra was rather something and a good test of the collimation of your scope (though please don't get hung up on this). Nick is a real expert at seaking out doubles and they are really fascinating in their own right = especially those with distincly different colours or where the companion is very faint.

The 200p is a good size for viewing DSOs and there is enough light grab for an OIII filter to bring out the otherwise invisible viel nebula. I have an eq mount which is less useful for imrpomtu viewng but it doesn't take me all that long to set up. I'm happy with the 200p and I haven't quite made my mind about what my next move would be.

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