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11 hours ago, Charic said:

Same view as above, but two Months later, and the new street lights (LED) have made a big difference to my plot.
The original large sodium bowl is now a simple spot.
The 'runway' lights are just patio edge decoration, which can be switched off.

 

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If I saw that one evening, I'd be looking for large circular burn marks on the lawn and counting my kidneys the next morning.

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A true dark site is not "pitch black". Once your eyes are fully dark adapted the sky is markedly bright with stars, Milky Way and natural airglow. Moving around without any artificial light is easy. A

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Another good, easy test for evaluating a dark sky site is to look at the night time clouds. If they are illuminated from underneath by local light pollution sources then the sky will not be as dark as

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My view from aprox 345 to 195 degrees is normally quite good. The distance across the state where I live is at the best 200 miles. Orlando 80 miles to the north, so I do get lots of glow on the horizon. Biggest problem in the trouble area is a fire department next door with newly installed LED floods on two sides facing me.

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3 hours ago, maw lod qan said:

Orlando 80 miles to the north, so I do get lots of glow on the horizon

?

I doubt there's any of mainland UK with the nearest city of 250,000 people 80 miles away outside the north-west coast of Scotland.

 

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I remember being at Kielder Water for one of the dark sky camps....  some clouds came over later in the night and the only way to notice was that the stars were disappearing. otherwise, no discernable change.

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On 22/01/2018 at 15:31, Captain Magenta said:

This matches my experience of my first properly dark site a couple of years ago in furthest SW Ireland, a couple of miles from Baltimore. Walking back from the pub one evening, I couldn’t actually make out most of the constellations, they were just drowned out in a sea of stars such as I'd never seen before, it was incredible. It was at that exact moment I decided to re-indulge my interest in Astronomy. Having said that, I do recall the only one that WAS obvious was Orion, perhaps that's what was meant by "an Orion sky" :wink2: ?

Magnus

Well put CM! I had this same experience near Coldstream on the Scottish border when stopping for a wee on the drive between Newcastle and Edinburgh several years ago now... 

My wife and I plan to move to Plymouth later on this year where we will be 30 mins from the centre of Dartmoor ?

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I remember, when I was at a boarding school in Dorset, nights where there were so many stars that it was difficult to pick out the constellations. But that was the late '60s - early '70s, not a chance of that now :icon_sad:.

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Hi all. I do not know if this is the right place to ask such a question so if not, please accept my apologies.

I have a 130/650 Newt. What would be the limiting magnitude of this scope under Bortle 7.25 (I know there is no such a thing but my skies are not 7 or 8 but somewhere in between closer to the 7, probably). I have checked some websites where you enter the specs of the instrument you have and they mention something like mag. 11. Somewhere here I have red a very good article about the limiting magnitude with a formula and according to it it gives again around 11. For my binos (SkyMaster 15x70) the limiting magnitude is around 8. However, it seems a lot to me.

Can somebody share his/her experience?

Thanks in advance.

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On 14/04/2019 at 11:10, robbymain said:

I had this same experience near Coldstream on the Scottish border when stopping for a wee on the drive between Newcastle and Edinburgh several years ago now... 

I wonder if I was far from that described location when I had my milky-way experience.  That was probably 13 years ago now during a drive between Colchester and Aberdeen.  We were def. towards the North of England driving through moorland type landscape in the middle of the night and the sky was that spectacular we stopped for a break to view it.

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I had gone for a camp in the Himalayas. Altitude above  4000mtrs above sea level . The best sky I've seen . The sky so lit by star that I struggled finding constellations and big empty spaces in the sky .

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My wife and I took a trip by rail out to Glacier Park in Montana, USA back in 2008.

It was the darkest place I have ever been :)

 

However, it ruined astronomy for me for several years. All I did when I got back was planetary :(

 

But one evening there wasn't any planets to view, and the DSO bug bit again :)

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