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Illicit star trade


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I've been getting friends asking me to take photographs of stars they have bought for loved ones for birthdays and such.

Today a friend asked me to photograph one she purchased from this mob. http://www.starregistry.com.au/

She said they wouldn't mind a photograph of it also.

Let me start by saying......

WHAT THE?

Is this even legal? How can you charge people $110 AUD for a thing that is not even yours!!?? How can you charge anything?

Skool me please SGL.

Baz.

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Watch out for delivery charges though. Those things are HEAVY!!Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

I get that it's not binding, and even if it was, what am I going to do with it? However, if it puts a smile on someones face, or gives them something to hold on to after losing someone close then I sa

At least you can return it under the long distance buying regulations sent from my Sony Xperia Z2

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Fifty six quid in my neck of the woods...think it's legal as it goes on here, too. A little bit cheaper, though.

I had a neighbour once asking me to find 'her' star using my hand powered dob. For grins, I did a search online for the star category and found no such reference...the documentation said it was in the 'vicinity' of Andromeda....

Publishing and printing costs per star an absolute minimal part of that charge...  :(

Surely a wee bit of meteorite would be a far better gift?

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Legal , possibly as who is going to contest the ownership ?

BUT morally so so wrong

However as a sentimental act to a loved one ( possibly deceased ) then it may be debatable as human emotion is a fickle thing.

I was gifted one for my 40th and although my family knows I don't really own the star they knew about my hobby and as the old saying states " it's the thought that counts "

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This has been going on for a long time. Over 20 years ago my folks "bought" me a star from the International Star Registry, a body that has as about the same official mandate as the Boys Spy Club that I set up with my mate Tim when I was 7. My parents thought they'd done a really lovely thing for me; but I knew this 14th magnitude tiddler would never really have my name recognised by the IAU.

I'm not sure it's technically illegal, but most definitely unethical; what annoys me is that they manage to fleece the bereaved into parting with a not insignificant amount of hard-earned under the false impression that they're immortalising their loved ones.

Agree with Beulah's comment on meteorite fragment - a truly cosmic gift!

Paul

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I did wonder about the phrase "Buy a star now" on the UK version of the website. Does that contravene UK legislation?

Chris

Watch out for delivery charges though. Those things are HEAVY!!

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It's no different from those selling stellarium and other free software.

Look at spaceweather.com and it's full of adverts for plots on Mars and such. It isn't illegal.

At the end of the day it's a lovely sentiment and no matter what people may think of it it is just a bit of fun. And as Kai said emotion certainly counts for something. My first contact with one of these was after the death of a friend and I doubt anyone would be lining up to tell a mother who has lost a child it's meaningless.

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As far as the legality goes I have no idea, but suspect since they've been at since 1979 it's all above board,

personally on a moral issue I see no problem with it. They clearly state that their name will not be recognised by the scientific community, only on their database and they will sell you a big fat hardback book with your name in it alongside some famous people if you so wish.

I think it's a great idea, just wish I'd thought of it first.

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As has been said this has been going on for a long time as have the "Buy a plot on the Moon" and "Buy a piece of Mars Real Estate" schemes.

Most of the ones that I've examined do have some small print somewhere that points out that what you are buying is a certificate and the "ownership" will not be recognised by international astronomy authorities. £50 does seem a lot for a piece of paper though ....

Here was my counter proposal on a previous occasion when this was discussed here:

http://stargazerslounge.com/topic/81710-name-a-star/?p=796800

There are plenty of Limpets left around here. They have the strongest teeth of any living thing too !:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-31500883

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Is there anything legally to stop me from setting up a website and selling of asteroids within the Kuiper Belt?.

Damn........i've just given my idea away.

There are plenty of Limpets left around here. They have the strongest teeth of any living thing too !:

I saw that on the news. Hardest natural substance known to mankind. They now plan to recreate it in labs and start building cars from it, including F1 cars.

Edited by LukeSkywatcher
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I get that it's not binding, and even if it was, what am I going to do with it? However, if it puts a smile on someones face, or gives them something to hold on to after losing someone close then I say go for it. My wife and kids got me one whendad died. I've never bothered to look for it but it made the kids happy (they were only 7-8) so as far as I'm concerned it was money well spent. After all, people buy/give "worlds greatest dad" mugs and I'm pretty sure there's not 50,000,000 worlds greatest dads, but I've still got mine :).

I say if you don't like it, don't buy one but theres no need to burst anyones bubble 

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I get that it's not binding, and even if it was, what am I going to do with it? However, if it puts a smile on someones face, or gives them something to hold on to after losing someone close then I say go for it. My wife and kids got me one whendad died. I've never bothered to look for it but it made the kids happy (they were only 7-8) so as far as I'm concerned it was money well spent. After all, people buy/give "worlds greatest dad" mugs and I'm pretty sure there's not 50,000,000 worlds greatest dads, but I've still got mine :).

I say if you don't like it, don't buy one but theres no need to burst anyones bubble 

I agree with this Scott as long as the cost reasonable. I don't think charging a hefty price such as £50+ is justified though.

If someone asks if their "ownership" is legit and formally regonised I think we have to be straight with them.

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Article II of the "Treaty on Principles Governing the Activities of States in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space, including the Moon and Other Celestial Bodies" states that "outer space, including the Moon and "other celestial bodies", is not subject to national appropriation by claim of sovereignty, by means of use or occupation, or by any other means" - to a picky lawyer this applies to governments and not companies offering to "sell"  you a chunk of  some planet or even some star and its entire system.  Whether that has any effect when the Vogons want to build a bypass...

P

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I agree with this Scott as long as the cost reasonable. I don't think charging a hefty price such as £50+ is justified though.

If someone asks if their "ownership" is legit and formally regonised I think we have to be straight with them.

oh I most definately agree John that all answers should be answered honestly. I would be somewhat surprised if anyone actually thought they owned a star although the more naive may think their naming may be legitimately recognised.

As for pricing, I guess its a tricky point. a few tens of pounds can be concidered as a novel bit of fun whereas a few thousand smacks of disception. I guess it's a case of buyer beware although in my opinion, it should be made very clear in the sales blurb that it holds no creedance.

Just my 2 cents worth :)

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Hi all, first post here :laugh:

As for this subject it's my understanding that they are just selling your the right to name a star (not the ownership) and that star will only be named on thier database. It will not be officially called Bob's star. I guess they are perfectly within thier right to say you can name a star on thier database but I don't actually think anybody is allowed to sell any part of outer space.

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