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MattJenko

What can the Skywatcher Evostar ED80 do for me?

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An ASI120M is a high frame rate mono camera from ZWOptical : http://astronomy-imaging-camera.com/product-detail/asi120mmc/

Using one of these cameras on Solar System objects is not very demanding on tracking and the mount, as you are taking short, high frame rate videos of the target and processing them differently than a deep sky object. The ED80 is not a great planetary scope as it has a small aperture and a shortish focal length, but it can be done. It can take lovely lunar images and as I am finding can do well on the Sun with the appropriate filters.

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Hi Donaldo,

the DSLR on the moon is fine. The picture below was shot with a Pentax K30 and the SW 80ED (I have to admit I used a cheapish 2x barlow). You can use the camera video mode or, as I prefer, take a few images at full resolution (I took 20 frames, 1/320" ISO 1600). Give the scope a bit of time to stop vibrating between shots and stack with Registax. Works a charm...

Good luck and clear skies!

HJ

post-39098-0-15517900-1435055408_thumb.j

Amazing how the website compresses a 7 MB file down to 64kB...

Edit: The image doesn't do the real picture any justice. I just uploaded the full resolution image here:

http://www.astrobin.com/full/189236/0/?real=&mod=

Cheers

HJ

Edited by hjw
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Thanks guys :)

I think I'll give DSLR imaging a go first with my ED80 before I ever take the CCD plunge ... The images are amazing though, I never thought such detailed deep sky photos were at all possible with a very humble 80mm scope ....  Even some of those lunar and planetary shots are awesome too!  Very well done all you guys!!! :D  I hope that one day I can do similar, but I'll have a lot of learning, and almost certainly much more spending to do first I expect!!! :shocked:

Clear skies!

Donaldo

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Wow, amazing images, reading this thread could have cost me a lot of money! I am awestruck by the quality  of the images you guys can produce. 

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One other thing that I feel should be noted - it is also possible to use it as a long lens for a DSLR.

You don't get the nice features like AF and IS but since I was quite familiar with film cameras (remember those?) I have been able to take some nice wildlife shots using a heavy duty tripod.

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One other thing that I feel should be noted - it is also possible to use it as a long lens for a DSLR.

You don't get the nice features like AF and IS but since I was quite familiar with film cameras (remember those?) I have been able to take some nice wildlife shots using a heavy duty tripod.

Absolutely. The DSO images in the first post in the thread are all DSLR images, albeit on an EQ mount.

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Damn! Those are amazing images!

A quick question. Are all these nice pics taken with the 0.85 reducer / flattener?

I just recived the Equinox 80 APO PRO. More or less the same optics as the Evostar ED 80. Cant wait to give it the first light!

On my upgrade list is the Skywatcher flattener that is recomended for the Equinox, but is it possible to close in on these pictures whitout the flattener?

...Magnus

/Edit: BTW sorry if i'm spamming the forum, but i have noone else to ask these questions :)

Edited by Magnus_e

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I use the flattener, but I have such a small chip that I doubt it is needed for a flat field for me. It does reduce the F-ratio however (x0.85), so speeds things up a bit, and makes the focal point a bit closer in, so the focuser doesn't need to be wound out so much, so is more stable.

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I use the flattener, but I have such a small chip that I doubt it is needed for a flat field for me. It does reduce the F-ratio however (x0.85), so speeds things up a bit, and makes the focal point a bit closer in, so the focuser doesn't need to be wound out so much, so is more stable.

Ok i see.

I'm itching to test the new scope!

It will not be "astronomical night" here until the 17/07-15.

It's a pain to live in Norway with this hobby in the summer. Think it's 49 days of daylight at my latitude.

Can't wait until winter when i can have a early dinner at 16:00 and go straight out to image :)

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Sorry to drag up this thread again, but adding a new image after doing a lot of tweaking with my guiding, which now has smaller, tighter stars. Still some distance from Uranium's miracle images, but best tracking I have achieved which shows the capabilities of the scope better. M15.

0250c97e243974ac7f354b2e15c552f3.1824x0_

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Here's a couple of my shots taken with ED80 and HEQ5. A great set up which was recommended by peeps on this forum. I very glad I listened to their advice.

Jellyfish Nebula taken with 460ex and Ha filter and guiding

post-15911-0-42229600-1440513965_thumb.p

Ring Nebula taken using Canon 1000D, no guiding

post-15911-0-20866400-1440514039_thumb.j

Veil Nebula using 1000D, no guiding

post-15911-0-76806200-1440514087_thumb.j

Sun using 1000D, no guiding

post-15911-0-04463500-1440514116_thumb.j

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Hi peroni - What an excellent set of images. That jellyfish is marvellous, and the sun is spot on!

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Super thread this, and brilliant images. I've been thinking of getting a SW ED80 as a more portable observing scope and wider field imaging.

A question .... Can the DSLR be rotated for framing an image when connected to the ED80 with the SW flattener and DSLR-M48 ring adapter? Or can this only be achieved with the FLO two-inch push-fit adapter for Skywatcher Focal Reducer? This fella http://www.firstlightoptics.com/adapters/flo-adapter-for-skywatcher-focal-reducers.html

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Super thread this, and brilliant images. I've been thinking of getting a SW ED80 as a more portable observing scope and wider field imaging.

A question .... Can the DSLR be rotated for framing an image when connected to the ED80 with the SW flattener and DSLR-M48 ring adapter? Or can this only be achieved with the FLO two-inch push-fit adapter for Skywatcher Focal Reducer? This fella http://www.firstlightoptics.com/adapters/flo-adapter-for-skywatcher-focal-reducers.html

Hi Ouroboros,

the 2" T-adapter slides into the scope without any orientational preference and is secured with two screws on the focuser of the scope. It can be rotated freely and I usually have issues with getting the orientation the same on consecutive nights. What you will need however, is a extension tube or ideally a field flattener which does the extension at the same time.

Cheers

HJ

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Sorry to drag up this thread again, but adding a new image after doing a lot of tweaking with my guiding, which now has smaller, tighter stars. Still some distance from Uranium's miracle images, but best tracking I have achieved which shows the capabilities of the scope better. M15.

Not quite a miracle mate ;) Just an almost pathological approach to data collection! Weight of numbers (ie: loads of subs!) :)

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Hi Ouroboros,the 2" T-adapter slides into the scope without any orientational preference and is secured with two screws on the focuser of the scope. It can be rotated freely and I usually have issues with getting the orientation the same on consecutive nights. What you will need however, is a extension tube or ideally a field flattener which does the extension at the same time.CheersHJ

Hello hjw ... OK so to summarise for the 'adapter challenged' like myself ...

Is this right? To connect a rotatable DSLR to the ED80 I need to:

Connect the DSLR camera to an M48 ring adapter connected to the SW flattener connected to the FLO 2" push-fit connector inserted into the 2" focuser of the SW ED80.

Edited by Ouroboros

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The dedicated reducer/flattener connects to the focuser by a M48 thread. There is a ring on the focuser which can be adjusted up and down the thread and this can be used to rotate the reducer and whatever is screwed into it, but it will change the focus as it is physically moving the attachments up and down the focuser thread. There is no free rotating aspect to the focuser as a whole.

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I see. So how do you frame your wonderful images? In the way you have just described?

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Once attached, I very rarely take the camera off. This means that even if I do multiple nights imaging, then the rotation/framing is the same for the same target. If I need to frame a target to start with, then I can either rotate the whole tube in the rings for little adjustments, or adjust the reducer/ring on the focuser thread itself and then refocus, but I can't remember the last time I needed to do this as most of my targets are chosen to fit well within my little Atik chip. I have plans for M33 soon, which is a larger target than normal for my setup and I may need to rotate to make sure I get the best profile for this particular target, we shall see.

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Matt - good luck with M33. I think it's one of the prettiest galaxies.

What sort of filter wheel do you use? Does that fit between the flattener and the camera?

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I use the StarlightXpress 7 position USB filter wheel and yes, it fits between the flattener and the camera with a spacer to make up the 55mm. I currently have LRGB, Ha, Oiii and a StarAnalyzer 200 installed.

Thanks for the encouragement. I did M33 with a DSLR when I started out, interested to see what I can do with it now!

Edited by MattJenko

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Matt - thanks for the info. I've not yet got into CCD imaging. But I might yet and it's interesting to find out how things are done.

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Hi Folks, after a little Help, if you don't mind.

Last night I had my first go at trying to get some images of M31, had My Canon 700d ,set on 'Bulb', 800 ISO, using an intervalometer to do 20sec exposures. I know this is only a very short time in 'image taking' but my 'Polar Alignment' isn't good, and I start 'Startrailing' after this.

Here is an example of last nights pics, not very good at all, I know. Even after trying to 'Process' something better.

So, is the fact you guys get such good images, down to 'good PA' , so you can get long exposures??

Or is there other things I should be doing with my 'Settings.

Any advice gratefully received. :)

post-35627-0-20671700-1441985512_thumb.j

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