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Revelation EP kit, anyone have any experience with these?


StarSeeker
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So, I'm thinking of shelling out on a EP kit, the kit contains 5 EP's (9,12,15, 20 and 32mm) a 2x barlow and a few filters and other bits n bobs in a lockable case.

Price is £120 on amazon but can get it in a deal for £100.

If anyone has any experience with this kit or the brand in general i would greatly appreceiate any input.

Also, would this kit be ok with my 130EQ? i'm still trying to get my head around the F ratio fast/slow scope thing and as i (barely) understand some scopes cope well with lower quality EP's and others not so, i'm also looking at getting another scope in the future, a 200 dob so would this kit carry over to the dob with ease? i'm hanging my nose over a skywatcher skyliner 200P if that helps.

Thanks in advance.

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Have the same scope and the same eyepiece kit,

The kit is a waste of money to be honest I cannot find a reason to use the filters,  and seldom use most of the eyepieces,  the ones I do use, are the 32mm that seems excellent to me, and the 12mm,  the barlow I removed the lens from and use the lens on the nose piece for my DSLR as that's the only way to get focus on this scope.

You would be far better off spending your money on a couple of decent eyepieces,  am told the BST starguiders are good and well priced but not so far managed to get around to buying any

 

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if you google GSO (who make Revelation) and Plossl you will get lots of useful info

Cracking pieces of kit, especially if you don't need to wear glasses - I do so only have the 20mm currently though a 32mm is in my future hopefully.

If you do wear glasses then the shorter ones have too little eye relief

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I don't think there is anything particularly wrong with the individual componants in the kit but when you break down those that you will actually use, the value for money is not so good.

You can buy the eyepieces and the barlow for £10-£15 each so you could buy a 3 eyepiece + barlow set, which, with some thought, will all be useful, for about £50.

Have a look here:

http://www.astroboot.co.uk/AstroBoot

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......I did exactly as John describes. I just wanted to try a revelation Plossl and now have 4?

Great  value  for my  £48 and were 'A1' New from Astroboot.

Just wish I had more spare time and some decent weather this Year to use them and my telescope,  I'm just limited to Fridays and Saturdays for observing now?

Oh how I wish I could retire again!

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Thanks for all the replies!

After more consideration i think personally i would benefit more by purchasing seperate EP's plus a barlow as opposed the the kit i mentioned, now the only dilemma is which to get? lol.

I know that a 32mm and barlow is top of my list, i already have stock EP's that came with the scope (20mm erecting and 10mm) so i'm guessing something that covers the "middle ground" so to speak.

Oh the choices to be made! i'm getting like a kid in a candy store syndrome lol.

Thanks for the advice.

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I bought the kit, and unlike others on here it seems, I have zero complaints.

The 32mm is a great EP, nice, wide-field views, and will screw straight onto a camera T-ring for taking shots.  It is great.

The Barlow is nice too.  Everyone should have one (despite everyone saying they shouldn't, lol).

As for the other EP's, I regularly use them all.  The 20mm probably the least as the supplied 20mm is almost as good, but the rest of them all have their uses to me, whether I barlow them or not, to get the desired magnification I want.

I bought the kit also because I wanted the case to put them in.  Hunting around and the case was £30 on it's own.  Then the EP's are £22 - £26 each (assuming you buy new), and £32 for the barlow, and £14 for the T-adaptor.  Again, all new prices, separately.  I am not disappointed with the relatively small outlay of £100 (although I did mess up and spend £120 on mine rather than £100), considering I'd have spent £76 before getting any actual EP's otherwise, and have a few different filters to play around with too. 

I may well in the future buy some better EP's, but as a decent set, to get me started, and see what sizes I might use the most in the future, to determine what ones to buy in much better quality, I'm happy.

Of course, if you can pick up what you need from Astroboot for £50, then fair enough.  But once you factor in the case at £30, what's an extra £20 to have it all brand new, and a couple extra EP's, T-adaptor and filters?  Then again, you may not be at all worried about the case.

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There really isnt much wrong with these kits. The gear you get in the Revelation kit (the photo visual one anyway) does seem more useful then what comes in the Celestron kit (which i bought). Some of it you may find you use very little. The 32mm eyepiece you will probably keep for life. Its great for scanning the skies hunting down targets and just delivers really nice wide field views. 

They are a great starter kit and allow you to get to know what sort of EP sizes you like or not. I think they are a tad over priced though and you are paying for the case and a few bits you may not use. The barlow could be not great. Mine wasnt good.

As John said, it might be a good idea, or at least worth researching buying 3 EP's (low,medium and high) and a good barlow.

I dont regret buying an EP kit. If i knew back then what i know now, i probably would have gone for 3 separate EP's. I gave away all the colour filters that came in the kit...........but kinda regret that now.

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I got one of these sets and use it with my Skywatcher 130P and are IMO a great value set. I've found the 2x Barlow to be of decent quality and the 32mm is great. I'm not overly convinced by the filters but it does include a Moon filter so it's ok I guess. My gut feeling is this set along with a 3x Barlow (to be hunted down soon!) and spending a little extra on top notch EP's is the way to go. No complaints from me - I picked these up for £100 at Telescope House. In summary - a great 'all-round' set but one that probably needs an additional 1 or 2 top quality EP's as well.

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I bought the set a couple of months ago, I am by far no expert but I have no complaints, they appear to be well made and I've had some super views through them. For the price I think they are exceptional value for money, I have at some point used them all. I haven't got my head round what the different coloured filters are for yet, the moon filter is very good, I tried them all on Jupiter, the purple blue and red one just made it purple blue and red, I do think I got a little more contrast from the olive green one but nevertheless it still made Jupiter green which I didn't like. But hey ho I'm sure they have their use somewhere, and they don't take up much room in the rather nice box.

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Despite settling on Tele Vue Delos eyepieces at £250 each, I can still say without hesitation that the Plössl eyepieces in the Revelation Eyepiece Kit are excellent, and are very nicely made indeed.

On the upside:

- Under critical planetary viewing, these eyepieces hold their own against the best eyepieces available

- The foam-lined case is nice, and not too big

- The 32mm with adjustable eye-relief is a wonderful EP for sure

On the downside:

- The 15mm has no field-stop (but is nonetheless a very sharp eyepiece)

- The moon filter definitely softens the image*

- I personally don't rate the barlow much (even though it's a best-seller in its own right)

However:

The real question is whether Plössls are the right eyepieces for you. Plössls are a classic design that does work well at longer focal lengths, but I personally find the distortion of bright stars near the edge of field at F5 and below a bit too much for my tastes - even with Tele Vue Plössls.

Other than for specialist, planetary viewing, the classic designs are being increasingly pushed aside by popular proprietary designs such as the BST Starguiders which are better corrected for your telescope.

Hope that helps.

Note: *this would therefore likely be true of the other filters in the kit (I've not tested, but by extrapolation it seems likely), but in any case, coloured filters are of limited use in smaller telescopes anyhow, so it's a bit academic.

Edited by great_bear
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I have owned the Revelation kit you mention as well as the older one that had more eyepieces included but not the barlow. I can't really pick any fault with them for the money. As for the filters, if you know what planets and what features are going to benefit from their use they do come in handy.

If your just starting out they are good as they give you a better idea what magnifications are going to work out best plus they come in a nice case so if looked after the eyepieces can remain in tip top condition. I think the trouble is that its a common misconception that all aberrations are due to the eyepiece. For example if you have a fast Newtonian your always going to see some coma as its the fast optics that produces it and not the eyepiece. There are obviously better corrected eyepieces than others which reduce other aberrations that become a distraction but depending on the speed of the scope the only way your going to get rid of coma is using a coma corrector.

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I have owned the Revelation kit you mention as well as the older one that had more eyepieces included but not the barlow. I can't really pick any fault with them for the money. As for the filters, if you know what planets and what features are going to benefit from their use they do come in handy.

If your just starting out they are good as they give you a better idea what magnifications are going to work out best plus they come in a nice case so if looked after the eyepieces can remain in tip top condition. I think the trouble is that its a common misconception that all aberrations are due to the eyepiece. For example if you have a fast Newtonian your always going to see some coma as its the fast optics that produces it and not the eyepiece. There are obviously better corrected eyepieces than others which reduce other aberrations that become a distraction but depending on the speed of the scope the only way your going to get rid of coma is using a coma corrector.

True to some extent - but telescope coma is so small enough to be masked by the abberations of "classic" eyepiece designs.

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