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alro

observing jupiter

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Hello all,

ive have what i would consider a few good viewing sessions of jupiter and have been pleased with what i have seen.

I have used my blue filter, yellow and no filter.

what filter is recommended for best views of jupiter, if any?

al

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None.

Cannot see any point in a blue or yellow Jupiter. :icon_scratch: :icon_scratch:

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Hi Al, I don't think there is any filter which gains over another filter they each "highlight" different qualities of the mighty Planet.

I've got a load of them, but just tend to use my Variable Polarising filter most of the time - through the 11" Jupiter is really bright and tends to "wash out" a lot of the features when I start an observing session.  The Polariser is rotated against the other Polarising filter and this just varies the amount of light "let through" - I tend to put one filter on the scope side of the diagonal and the other filter in the set on the base of the EP, then just by rotating the EP, it alters the amount of light - I just make the image slightly darker - not by much - just enough to take the glare off the image - the more time I spend looking, the more detail becomes apparent and I can just alter the amount of light as time goes by and your able to build a nice image from the few seconds at a time of the atmosphere just steadying enough to see finer detail.

I think the more time you spend just looking, the more detail becomes apparent - there is no real hard and fast rule - just patience - some nights are much better than others, better atmosphere - more stable - allowing the detail to become easier to see.

The best nights will always stick with you, it just takes a little time to understand which nights will be "Gud uns" - and some nights where it doesn't matter how long your out observing - your just not going to be able to render detail.

Not sure if your a member of a society or you have any observers you know - would be nice if you can borrow a Variable Polarising filter to try before you buy.

Paul.

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Orion in the USA sells a so-called Jupiter Observing Filter. Before you leap and click - I took a good look at the ad. Plain as day, the filter says it's an 80A Blue. A very common filter found in many of those filter-sets novices often buy, which then sit collecting dust for 20 years. Take a look at your blue filter - it might be one. I'll bet any blue filter would do about the same as the 80A. Whatever they may be. I wrote Orion a note on the ethics of re-naming a common coloured filter and jacking-up the price. Never heard back from the.....

http://www.telescope.com/Accessories/Telescope-Eyepiece-Filters/125-Orion-Jupiter-Observation-Eyepiece-Filter/pc/-1/c/3/sc/48/p/101703.uts

Anywho - there it is.

Some people have said they've had better contrast using a variable polarizing-filter set. I intend to try that at some point.

Clear Skies,

Dave

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I've used a 82A (light blue) filter to improve contrast of lunar and Jupiter features before with *some* success and they're not exactly expensive. You could also try glancing at an illuminated white card before observing Jupiter, as John's mentioned in the exit pupil thread that's running at the moment ;-))

Good Seeing beats anything I've tried though. Just wish I could find more of it.

James

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None.

Cannot see any point in a blue or yellow Jupiter. :icon_scratch: :icon_scratch:

I tried an 80A Blue, neodymium, and no-filter with my 130p a while back. I found the Neodymium did pull out a bit more detail, but the colours didn't quite look right. The Blue also increased contrast, and was pretty much as good as the Neodymium - though clearly with very odd colours and a much lower price tag. Both improved contrast over no-filter at all.

That said, I usually don't bother with the filters; such a faff to fit for one target. But they did, I felt, improve contrast. 

Edit: previous discussion: http://stargazerslounge.com/topic/206527-filter-advice-please/?p=2193061

Edited by AndyWB
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The only use i found for my set of filters, which I inherited with a scope that I purchased, was to remove all the coloured glass and

screw them all together into the Binoviewer with the barlow on the end. This stack gave me a further 65 mm of penetration into the

focusser of the Lightbridge and works beautifully.This idea I hasten to add was from a post I found on the forum, and not my own

genius.

I prefer to see all objects in their true colours. :smiley:

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I have a purple tinted moon filter from Amazon which is almost useless on the moon - but good enough on Jupiter to turn the lights down a bit, and reduce snow blindness.

The purple tint seems to bring out the storm bands quite well.

If it is the end of the night I will try to view without a filter and risk a bit of retina burn.

Then bump my way back indoors when I can't see where I am going.

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I have used the blue 80 a and found that it helps to define the cloud structures better ,I tend to swap between this and no filter to enjoy the natural colours of Jupiter .

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There is also another thread running on the merits of the Tele-Vue Planetary Filter which is somewhere near the top of the eyepiece section. There are a few on site that have this now and it is one that I keep thinking about but the 113 pounds changes my mind, it is one of those that would be nice to try out first but I wouldn't pull such tricks from here on a UK supplier.

Alan

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Hi Al, I don't like the colour filters as the just create a colour cast in my opinion and are of no benefit.  The only filter out there that will enhance the viewing of Jupiter is the TV Planetary filter that Alan mentions above, it works very well and now I never view Jupiter without it.  The only downside is that it is a bit expensive, I bought mine from the US (AgenaAstro) before they were available here.

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Thanks robin/alan,

i have had a look at the tv planetry filter thread, it does seems to have a few singing its praises, i may just wait a little longer and go for one of those.

Yes it would be good if you were able to try or see one before commiting to buying.

al

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I found this article interesting http://agenaastro.com/choosing-a-color-planetary-filter.html

I have used  coloured filters in the past to enhance my photography when I used to produce and print my own 35mm prints.  Filters are used to block or enhance light/  colour if there is enough of it, and during the day, not a problem.

During the night, there is so  little colour, visually, that I find it hard to warrant buying any filters,  for my telescope. That said, you won't know until you try. Like everything else, its a personal thing.

I see you have an 8" scope, so the  filters should  work. as explained in the link.

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Thanks Charic,

seems like out of the coloured filters, the #80 that i have is most useful for jupiter and violet is a no go.

Al

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The 200p dob had a clear view at 200x and 240x magnification on Jupiter last night.

I tried it with no filter.

But it was too bright, and had very little contrast.

If I stuck with it, my eyes might have adjusted - eventually.

But it was easier to go back to my normal set-up, and use the polarised moon and purple moon filters doubled up.

PS - the seeing was so good last night, that the Orion nebula dust cloud looked so much bigger than normal at the outer egdes.

I doubt I would have seen as much of the faint fine detail without dark adaptation (i.e. filters for Jupiter)

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I don't use them very often and they were a very cheap set of 4! :D

Mostly, as others have said, I like to observe Jupiter as he is.

However, when conditions are excellent, it is possible to tease out a little more detail with a filter if you don't mind the colour it turns the whole planet as a result.

On the few occasions I have tried them, I only used a blue, red and a yellow filter.

The Blue filter did make the main two belts and the GRS more prominent, I assume because it will help red objects stand out more.

The Red filter had the opposite effect of making detail like festoons more obvious.

The Yellow filter showed more contrast and in particular helped when viewing transit shadows.

I wouldn't rush out to buy them, and I've no idea what difference a quality set would have over my cheapos, but they definitely tease out that extra detail on a good night.

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Great Thread - I was out last night and to be honest the sky was very poor - it was clear, but the seeing was just terrible - I had a few odd minutes where the atmosphere steadied a little, but the majority of the time I spent just trying to get the best of a bad night - I checked to see when the GRS was visible, I use the Sky and Telescope Java app and also Night Sky Tools for the Android, both seem to give different times and both were out by a long margin, I could just about tell when the spot was showing on the disk - just by the red colour.

I tried the Neo filter - I think no matter what filter I used, it just wasn't any good - there was the odd second or two when white oval detail was there, also on the North Equatorial belt, there was a large storm nearly directly above the Red Spot, but the atmosphere was so unsteady that I could just make "hints" of detail.

I've come to prefer the Variable Polarising Filter, just to take the edge off a very bright disk in the 1100 - but even last night I didn't bother using the Polariser.

As we all know your just going to get nights like this where detail in  the 1100 was more or less "washed out" by the atmosphere - nice to put to memory the really good nights which stay with me for a long time - I think if I was new to this, last night would have been frustrating to say the least - all you can say is - hang on in there,  use these sort of nights to evaluate the seeing conditions and just remember that its going to get better ?

Paul.

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