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Solar Viewing Heat Issues


SunBear
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I know you guys over there in the UK don't get too much intense Sun compared to us over here in Arizona, but do you have any recommendations as to what to do about the heat issues using a black optical tube in midday Sun?

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Heat issues...what are they :shocked:

The only advice to prevent them would be the obvious like

  • Cover the equipment with something reflective like a white sheet
  • Wait until later in the day before observing so it isn't so hot
  • Observe in the shade

It does sound like we are all at the mercy of the elements but for different reasons :grin: how frustrating it must be to be able to see the sun and not be able to use your scope ...maybe the clouds are not so bad after all

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I'm in Oz, and the temperatures can reach well over 40 deg C (>100 deg f)

I feel it's more important to protect the observer than the scope!!

I have resorted to covering the scope and camera with aluminium kitchen foil on a couple of occasions.

You can always provide a shade covering the scope (and yourself!) with only the objective exposed to the sun.

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Depending on the type of solar observation and filters used, the heat inside the telescope can far exceed the ambient temperature, e.g. Herschell wedges. Keeep a Sun hat on for yourself.  :smiley:

I haven't used my Hershel wedge yet, but there is a big red circle on the back of it saying "caution hot surface". I know i shouldnt....................but when i do use it i am going to put my finger on that red circle (the heat trap) to see how hot it is.

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I have a big black reflector OTA  and live in Spain so know the issue well but can't say I have come up with any solutions.

I haven't gone as far as wrapping up the tube in tin foil.

The only thing I can say is start as early as possible, after a certain time of day it is pointless using the reflector for me and in general I get 30 minutes of good scope seeing before I have to pack it in.

Using the smaller Ha scopes and refractor however give me much more time to utilise.

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I'm in Oz, and the temperatures can reach well over 40 deg C (>100 deg f)

I feel it's more important to protect the observer than the scope!!

I have resorted to covering the scope and camera with aluminium kitchen foil on a couple of occasions.

You can always provide a shade covering the scope (and yourself!) with only the objective exposed to the sun.

The tin foil idea sounds great! I will definitely try it.

Cheap and easy to come by materials are where it's at.

Thanks for the input. 

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I know you guys over there in the UK don't get too much intense Sun compared to us over here in Arizona, but do you have any recommendations as to what to do about the heat issues using a black optical tube in midday Sun?

Stop showing off !! :)

Love your avatar by the way

Edited by jabeoo1
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  • 2 weeks later...

This is a slight digression from the original question, but I'm sure there was once a story of someone who left their scope uncovered and uncapped on the porch.  As the sun moved round, it shone straight down the tube, focused on the porch and set fire to it.  (I think the scope got burned up in the ensuing blaze.)

SunBear is right to be cautious about that big light in the sky :smiley:

Mary

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