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Help Please


Shelster1973
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I appear to be a bit of a numpty....and my callipers may be slightly out of cal (last time I use digital ones).

Am getting the bits together for my wooden pier project and have had the plates done for the mount, but it appears that teh hols I have had cut in teh middle of the top plate was too big for my AVX (my fault not machinist)

What i was wondering is if there is anyone with a 3D printer who would be an absolute star and make me a collar so that I can fit it over teh AVX and give a snug fit?

Am more than happy to pay for materials and postage too.

Not 100% sure what the actual size of the AVX mount collar is, but hopefully someone else on here can provide the details.

Have contemplated getting some disc brakes for it, but thought I would try this line as already have teh trwo plates ready to go....just need a bit of modding and fettling

Many thanks in advance

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Give me the dimensions and a rough drawing and I'll look into it :)

Please bear in mind that the SGL CoC doesn't allow trading through the board other than as provided for by the Classifieds section.

Edited by Gina
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I could do that for you FOC :)  Cost of materials would be a few pence and being only 3mm thick I could just pop it in an envelope - I'm perfectly happy to absorb that minimal cost :)  What colour would you like? :D  Bear in mind though that it would be printed in ABS which has a certain amount of flexibility.

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Hi,

Not sure how hard the material is from a 3d printer or exactly the use you want to use them, but big but,  I needed some 60mm od 12mm id washers for my pier and I got them from ebay in the end, dialled in the sizes and found a supplier, forget how much but not much, I think that they called them panel washers.

Regards

Mike

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Hi,

Not sure how hard the material is from a 3d printer or exactly the use you want to use them, but big but,  I needed some 60mm od 12mm id washers for my pier and I got them from ebay in the end, dialled in the sizes and found a supplier, forget how much but not much, I think that they called them panel washers.

Regards

Mike

The materials most commonly used are PLA and ABS - you can Google their properties for the definitive answer.  I currently use ABS as that works best with the UP! Plus 2 printer that I use.  I have also used PLA in the past with a 3D printer kit that kept going wrong but that's another story (and thread on SGL)  ABS is what Lego bricks are moulded from and also a lot of other plastic items.  It is fairly hard and very tough with a high breaking strain.

The advantage of 3D printing is that you can design almost anything of any shape within a certain size in CAD software such as SketchUp (free) and print it out.  For examples see my many threads of all sorts and for further ideas look at Thingiverse which has thousands of things ready to 3D print.

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Gina no doubt as you have found with your printer you can also influence the strength of a component  by its design - fillets, webs, avoidance of stress raisers  etc.  All of the these considerations would be second nature to a traditional draftsmen who would have prepared the drawings for conventional machining.   I was wondering Gina, when you first start printing are there tutorial guides/community forums available that point these techniques out or is it largely trial and error? Have you experimented yet with something like an embedded mechanical fastener - say a stud, captive nut  or strengthening plate - I haven't seen it yet in a 3 d print component but I am sure it must be possible. I must admit, having seen your work with your printer  I can see them fast becoming a must have for the serious hobbyist/maker. I'm hoping to be a 3d printer by the end of the year - fingers crossed. :smiley:

Jim

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Gina no doubt as you have found with your printer you can also influence the strength of a component  by its design - fillets, webs, avoidance of stress raisers  etc.  All of the these considerations would be second nature to a traditional draftsmen who would have prepared the drawings for conventional machining.

Yes indeed, I use my knowledge of structural engineering in the design.  The things you mention and also avoiding sharp inside corners where excess stress can be caused at the corner - there is a tool in SketchUp to produce rounded corners of any sort.

I was wondering Gina, when you first start printing are there tutorial guides/community forums available that point these techniques out or is it largely trial and error?

There is plenty of stuff online though finding the relevant part is not easy.  There is the RepRap Wiki and several forums run by the 3D printer suppliers and manufacturers.  When I started I couldn't find much helpful info online and resorted to trial and error.  One thing I can say is that the strength is lower between layers than across the layer so the printing orientation is worth considering if strength in a particular direction is important.

Have you experimented yet with something like an embedded mechanical fastener - say a stud, captive nut  or strengthening plate - I haven't seen it yet in a 3 d print component but I am sure it must be possible.

I have embedded nuts in the past by pausing the print at the top of the hexagonal hole and then dropping/pushing the nut in and resuming printing.  More often though I have just provided a suitable slot so that the nut can be inserted after printing is complete.

I must admit, having seen your work with your printer  I can see them fast becoming a must have for the serious hobbyist/maker. I'm hoping to be a 3d printer by the end of the year - fingers crossed. :smiley:

Jim

Yes, mine has had a very considerable amount of use, verging on enormous I think :D  I think I'm beginning to see signs of wear so things might need tightening up or adjusting before too long :D  It is extremely useful and has enabled me to make things easily and cheaply that would have been hard word work to carve out of metal or whatever - I've used wood quite a lot in the past and sometimes pieces of plastic.

Good luck in becoming a 3D printer in due course :)  I hope some of my threads in The Lounge about my findings etc. with 3D printers will help and act as tutorials.

Edited by Gina
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Gina crossing the orientation of the layer is is clever, I never thought of that as a possibility with 3d printing.  I wonder if 3D printing techniques have started to work their way into the engineering courses.  If it has it would be good to see what they teach.

Jim

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