Jump to content

Stargazers Lounge Uses Cookies

Like most websites, SGL uses cookies in order to deliver a secure, personalised service, to provide social media functions and to analyse our traffic. Continued use of SGL indicates your acceptance of our cookie policy.

aust202

A bit of observing advice

Recommended Posts

I have a Skywatcher 150P and the other night I was going to try and view Jupiter, frustratingly I could get it in my view finder, but for the life of me I couldn't find it in the telescope view. In the end I gave up and looked at the moon for a bit, but what am I doing wrong. Also I was looking at getting one of these GoTo kits to attach to my mount, is this a good idea and are they easy enough to use?

Thanks in advance

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sounds like you need to align your finder and start with low power.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sounds like the finder and the main scope are not aligned.

Take scope out during the day, look round and find something about 1 or 2 miles away and get that in view in the main scope. Then adjust the finder so the same thing is central. The recheck the main scope and go through adjusting the finder again if it is not.

Use the longest eyepiece you have.

Hopefully then you can point the finder at Jupiter and it appears in the main scope.

You will have to check and adjust the finder at regualr intervals, things have a habit of moving.

Goto kit?

Not sure, what mount is the scope on?

If EQ3-2 then not sure the cost of the kit is worth it, the 3-2 mount is not the most stable and an EQ5 with goto wold make more sense, but more cost.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One of the first things you need to do during each evening's setup is align the finder to the telescope, perhaps ideally in daylight. Find something obvious by starting off using the finder and then get it centred in the scope (via trial and error), and 'tune' the finder to the scope by ensuring what's central in the scope becomes central in the finder. Then test this by using the finder on some other target.

Personally, I'd suggest you don't resort to GOTO unless time prohibits you learning your way around the sky. What you learn will be useful for a lifetime of observing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Personally, I think go-to can at times be great, but it won't help you if your finder is out. Play around with it as per Ronin's instructions above. I'm pretty certain this is your current issue. It's not that difficult if you follow the instructions, so you'll be absolutely fine.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree this is a finder issue, follow Ronin's instructions and then when you get out under the stars fine tune using Polaris as this won't move. Using your highest power eyepiece (shortest focal length) get Polaris right in the middle then adjust your finder. 

After this you should find you have no issues with lining up on Jupiter or anything else.

Good luck.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the replies folks, all sorted now. Managed to view Jupiter, all be it was only able to get a small viewing. I was viewing it through a wide angle eye piece through a 2x barlow. Im guessing I would need a new barlow like a 3x or something, is that correct?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When you say wide angle, what 'mm' measurement does the eyepiece have written on it? It seems like I have the same scope as you...I find the BST 8mm (no Barlow) the best out of my collection to view Jupiter and her moons. Although if the seeing allows, sometimes the 12mm with a 2xBarlow works. But conditions have to be just right.

Clear Skies!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I find that viewing Jupiter is very nice between 150x and 180x magnification. Your 150P has a focal length of 750mm - divide that by the eyepiece size to get mag. eg 750/10mm eyepiece = 75x mag. So a 2x barlow would give you 150x.

However - if you're using the supplied eyepieces and barlow the views will be worse the more magnification you use. The higher the mag the more you magnify atmospheric imperfections making the view go grainy. Pic a very clear night with good transparency and preferably the darkest site possible for best views, and consider upgrading your eyepieces from the basic ones supplied with the scope. Hth :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.