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Celestron Astromaster 130EQ


campbellian3
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Hi. My First Topic. My Son purchased a Celeston Astromaster EQ for me for Christmas. I am having great diffuclity using it. I have found the moon once but it seems to have disappeared. I live in Hinckley, are thier such things as Star Gazers Courses. I attended an Astrology course and felt I was doing a Maths Degree. Please Help :-(  :huh:

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Hi I had the same thing happen to me but as a complete and utter novice I can 

only suggest (1)read the manual 

                     (2) practice in daylight on the most distant object you can see

others may be able to give better advice  :smiley:  but  keep trying and good luck

Regards Robin

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You should try to find your way around the sky using a basic book like "Guide to the night Sky" by Phillips. You could also download Stellarium (free) to help with this. Practice finding your way about and identifying some constellations like The Plough  and it gets easier once you can. First target should be the Moon to get used to focusing then look for Jupiter as it's the brightest object in the night sky apart from the Moon. Stick at it - it gets easier. By the way its not "Astrology" its Astronomy - we don't talk about Astrology!

Peter

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Hi and welcome to the forum. Yes astrology is a little different to astronomy though there was a connection in times past when astronomy was in its earliest stages of development, but being a Leo I guess you knew that already!  :grin: Astronomy isn't difficult it's just that there is a lot of it but on the upside you have a lifetime to learn it as the stars aren't going anywhere in a hurry. Stellarium as mentioned above is a great tool to get you started with lots of tools to keep you motivated. Importantly it can be easily configured so as to provide you with the same identical sky as that which you can see form your observation site which makes finding and identifying objects a lot easier. It also has an advance date/time tool that helps you calculate when objects will be coming into view as they ascend above the horizon. You might find that YouTube is also a useful resource in helping you to setup your scope (balance and align the spotter scope) to collimate your scope (align the optical parts together to provide a sharp image) and how to locate objects and understand what it is you're looking at. 

Probably the best resource for you is going to be your local astro club or observing group who can certainly provide you with hands on advice and guidance.

Clear skies, take your time and hope you enjoy your stay here.  :smiley:

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Hi Cambellian3 and welcome to SGL, Astronomy is a vast subject, helpful information you can be had from books, but the best practical experience is to observe and learn your way about the night sky. Invaluable help can also be had by joining a local Astronomy club, if you have one in your area. Scope use will come with practice, but if you are encountering difficulties, post your relevant questions in the beginners help sections of the forum, enjoy your new scope :)

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Welcome to SGL :)

First thing to do is make sure your finder scope/ red dot finder is alligned with the telescope. You can do this during the daytime by pointing the scope at a distant object then adjusting the finder until the images match. TV aerials are good for this, but needless to say not one anywhere near the direction of the Sun, might be easy to forget when concentrating on other things, so I hope you don't think I'm being condescending by perhaps stating the obvious  :icon_pirat:  ;)  

Once the finder is lined up you should find it a whole lot easier :alien:

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Hello and welcome from me too - I started out with an astromaster too, and once you get used to it, it really is a good scope. (My avatar pic is my daughter using ours at the 2012 transit of Venus!) Do find the links on here (pinned in the  getting started section) to balancing the scope and aligning the finder - it will make a world of difference.  I do have to say that I found the finder very difficult to use and upgraded to a simple red dot finder pretty quickly - that might help you find the Moon again   :smiley:   Lastly, I remember well the first few times out with the scope, discovering that actually it's all harder than it looks - it's a steep learning curve but stick with it, you are starting in the right place - lots of helpful advice on this site   :smiley:

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