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sharkmelley

Lovejoy with Pleiades - 18 Jan

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Comet Lovejoy passes the Pleiades.

Canon 600D with 50mm lens at f/5.6   

Stack of 12 exposures of 5min each at ISO 800 then cropped.

Mark

post-19658-0-19446800-1421622636_thumb.j

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Excellent Mark, I spent an hour imaging the dew on the lens, started again but it's gone off into the LP so hope we get another clear night.

Dave

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Just what I've been waiting for!

Beautiful image :)

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Lovely picture. I like the way you catch the merope nebula in it as well.

Another interesting thing about this shot is that if you asked a non-astro person "which way is the comet 'flying'?" They would say "to the right". Even though it's actually going up!

Edited by greglloyd

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Sit's nicely in the FOV and the framing works really well :)

Looking at the forecast it looks like last night was the best night for a while... So I'm glad I got out and did something...

Peter...

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Awesome! Just out of interest, does the f stop matter? I always thought that for astrophotography it's best to have it as wide open as possible?

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Awesome! Just out of interest, does the f stop matter? I always thought that for astrophotography it's best to have it as wide open as possible?

I depends on the lens used - stopping down will usually result in better star shapes in the corners and also reduce vignetting focusing is also less critical. Stoiping down using the lenses internal iris results in diffraction patters on the brighter stars - the pattern will depend on the number and shape of the blades.. alternatively you can use a front aperture mask which gives round stars without artefacts - Filter step down rings can be used as front aperture masks or you can cut them using a cutting compass - just remember to cut the outer circle first....

I always focus on a star at one of the four thirds point  intersections as this tends to give optimal focusing across the full frame and will sometimes allow you to use the lens "wider open"...

Peter...

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I depends on the lens used - stopping down will usually result in better star shapes in the corners and also reduce vignetting focusing is also less critical. Stoiping down using the lenses internal iris results in diffraction patters on the brighter stars - the pattern will depend on the number and shape of the blades.. alternatively you can use a front aperture mask which gives round stars without artefacts - Filter step down rings can be used as front aperture masks or you can cut them using a cutting compass - just remember to cut the outer circle first....

I always focus on a star at one of the four thirds point  intersections as this tends to give optimal focusing across the full frame and will sometimes allow you to use the lens "wider open"...

Peter...

But I imagine it's a trade off, because then you'd also need expose for longer, wouldn't you? Also, do you want diffraction patterns? Is that just a personal preference thing? Also also, what's a four thirds point intersection? Also also also, sorry OP for hijacking your thread :)

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Imagine 2 horizontal and 2 vertical lines each line 1/3rd of the way in from the edge of the frame .. where these "imaginary"  lines cross is the 1/3rd's intersection point. By focusing  on a star at one of these points rather than the centre of the FOV you will get the best "compromise" focus across the whole frame...

Apologise to the OP for answering the question in the thread...

Peter...

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Thanks for your comments.

I stopped the lens down to deal with aberrations in the corners.  In the end I needn't have done because I cropped the final image anyway.

Mark

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Lovely framing. 5 minutes shows lots.

This view was what I hoped for but discovered I had used the wrong lens.

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Nicely done. I saw the comet a few nights ago and had nothing but cloud since.

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