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t0ny

Canon 1100d, good enough for DSO?

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So far in this and many other hobbies I have made the same mistake going entry-level and then lost money in the long run when upgrading.

I already subscribed to Nikon a long time ago so have a bag full of Nikon for normal photography but what I think I want (based on support) is a Canon body that I get modified to stick onto the scope.

I have seen some amazing photos taken with entry level cameras like the 300d, 450d and 1100d so what I would like to know is, other than megapixel, what would be the gain in going for a better camera than say a used 1100d?

Thanks

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I went for a used, astromodded 450D, and don't regret it. I might get something better later, but I first want to find out if this DSO imaging malarky is really for me. Once I know I like it and I feel I want to upgrade from a basic DSLR for imaging, I might well go straight to a CCD. I could still keep the 450D for wide-field

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I had a 1100D, then upgraded to a 600D modded, the made reason a swivel LDC screen, with a Newt they get in some awkward positions so the flip out and twist screen really does a good job, I along with many others chose this guy to supply the DSLR, it very good service....

http://cheapastrophotography.vpweb.co.uk/

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I have a 450d and a 60d... From an AP point of the view, the more expensive 60d really doesn't buy much over the 450d. The higher pixel count, therefore higher pixel density could leave you prone to more noise. The 60d is a heavier camera than the 450d, meaning that it's more weight to hang on the focuser, and the inherent problems this can cause. Given you're requirements, I wouldn't worry about getting a camera from higher up the canon range. I use the 450d for AP and the 60d for normal (occasionally using the 450d as a second body with a different lens attached). 

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Thank you!
 

It doesn't look like there's much difference between the 450d and the 1100d, even in price so i'll perhaps wait on CheapAstrophotography to see if he gets either in.

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I own a 450d and have used a 1100d and there is very little in it. The 1100d feels a little more advanced, but for astro, I couldn't tell the 2 apart.

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I have an 1100d  I started out unmodded, and then modified it after a year. it is quite capable either way

www.flickr.com/photos/123154518@N08

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Will you always use a laptop attached to it. Only Tinker brings up the point of the articulated screen on the 600d being very useful.

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Will you always use a laptop attached to it. Only Tinker brings up the point of the articulated screen on the 600d being very useful.

I have EQMod running and subscribe to APT, but sometimes i just use a remote interval meter and no PC, very handy if your in the middle of a field...:)

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I don't use a laptop... The lack of articulated screen on the 450d, doesn't bother me... It's useful on the 60d, but as I use DSLRController on my phone or tablet (both Dndroid)to focus, using a USB cable, I don't use the camera's screen anyway. I use an intervalometer to control the camera. If I'm using my HEQ5 with guiding etc, then I use APT for capture on my laptop, but then I need the laptop for guiding and mount control. 

I've used my phone to focus when I used my portable setup in a field.

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I started off with a 1100D and was delighted with the results from it - I used it a lot with the software provided with the camera and the live view zoom was brilliant for nailing good focus. I really couldn't fault it.

I eventually had it astromodified by Juan at cheapastrophotography and that was a quantum leap.

For the price I would suggest that its very hard to beat.

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Just recently had my Canon 100d modified by Juan at CheapAstrophotography and am delighted with the results. Here's one I posted yesterday: http://stargazerslounge.com/topic/234026-horsehead-with-modded-100d/

Some people criticise the 100d for its physical size, being smaller in the hand, but I find this an advantage.Not sure if this makes it lighter, which is always a bonus when attaching further items to a mount!  Also the lack of a swivel lcd screen makes no difference to me as I always use it connected to the laptop.

David

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I was never happy with my previous cameras, started off with a 300d, then 400d but I now consider it worth spending the time gathering data with the 1100D. Bought it Modded from Juan and the best camera to date. I really  didn't see it worth spending anymore, it's got to be the best value camera for now anyway. 

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So far in this and many other hobbies I have made the same mistake going entry-level and then lost money in the long run when upgrading.

I already subscribed to Nikon a long time ago so have a bag full of Nikon for normal photography but what I think I want (based on support) is a Canon body that I get modified to stick onto the scope.

I have seen some amazing photos taken with entry level cameras like the 300d, 450d and 1100d so what I would like to know is, other than megapixel, what would be the gain in going for a better camera than say a used 1100d?

Thanks

The Megapixel count is the most unimportant part of the equation. My 2.8 Mega Pixel Atik 428 beats the pants off my modded 1100d as far as sensitivity and noise are concerned and has much better / pixel resolution but it is small in comparison.There are reports that the newer canon sensors are less noisy and slightly more sensitive than an 1100d but until I see some meaningful tests I would say that an 1100d preferably modded and coupled to a decent fast scope is your best bet. In AP most of the gimmicks that these new cameras have for day time photography are just not needed. The newer ones like the 600d have a cropped video mode that may become useful in imaging the Moon or Jupiter. You will also find that the demand on your computer in processing is much less with a lower Mega Pixel camera.

A.G

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The Canon EOS 1100D DSLR is Canon's most basic, entry level DSLR. Here are more canon options for you , you can compare side by side 

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The Canon EOS 1100D DSLR is Canon's most basic, entry level DSLR. Here are more canon options for you , you can compare side by side 

For astro imaging you don't need a top of the range EOS 70 or 7d

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agree with that, we probably don't need 90% of what the 1100D has to offer anyway, I only use manual & AV for flats then control it from APT. No point paying for lots of features  that wont be used.

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The Canon EOS 1100D DSLR is Canon's most basic, entry level DSLR. Here are more canon options for you , you can compare side by side 

The OP is interested in Astro Imaging and not Daytime photography as I understand so "Amateur Photography"  style comparisons are meaningless  . The requirements are very different. If the OP wishes to know what is important in a camera for AP then having a look at the specs and features of the cameras that are designed for AP ie: Cooled CCDs whether Mono or OSC will help clear things up.

A.G

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Hello,

the only mainstream software that is not available for Nikon at the moment is nnebulosity. If you consider buying a dedicated astro dslr right now, i really would consider a used Nikon D5100. With Backyardnikon ( dithering software is available and working) and with the Nikon hacker project (something like magic lantern for canon, just not as advanced) you also get true black level from the D5100 (plus disable star eater algorythm). The sensor in the D5100 has very low read noise (already 3e at Iso 100) and very low dark signal generation at room temperature (0.15e per second). Maybe the 7D2 has a better sensor, but excluding that i would say that the D5100 will give you the best sensor(with true raw files) of any DSLR (excluding full frame) at the moment. You can get them used for around 180,- €.

In addition you could continue to use all your Nikon glass for wide field shots.

best regards

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Thanks for all your help everyone, I have decided to grab a Astromodified 1100d from Juan (very nice chap) at CheapAstrophotography.

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