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Going rate for secondhand equipment??


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Not sure if this is the right forum, please feel free to move.

Just a general query. What do people feel is the going rate for secondhand scopes, mounts, cameras, guide scopes etc etc.?

Have read a few comments where people say they won't pay more than 50% of the new price, and that there is plenty of choice, etc, but.....

....Many ads both here, on AstroBuySell and flea-bay have asking prices far in excess of 50%, often in excess of 75% of new.

So, do you have a feel for how much is too much, without expecting a massive bargain, but a the same time without being ripped off? I suspect the rate may differ depending on whether it's a scope or GOTO mount or camera, but lets see. I will assume the item is in good condition, used but not abused and say 18 months to 3 years old.

My first stab, for a starter, is to look to pay about 60 - 65% of new.....

Over to you

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Personally I'd say there's no hard and fast rule. I look at a scope or anything else on abs and pay what I am prepared to pay for it. I've never actually calculated whether my purchases have been a certain percentage of the new price.

This does not allow for the fact that some items / makes will hold their value better than others.

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No hard and fast rule, seems that about 2/3 of the new cost is what many consider about right, add a bit either side and you have 50-75% as mentioned above.

Will depend on what the item is.

Have seen people on ABSUK asking close to the new cost, occasionally even above the new cost - I guess the assumption is their ownership has somehow increased the value. Oddly seems to often be 200P dobsonians where this occurs. Seen 3 I think like this and no idea why. Also occurs just after Stargazing Live is on TV.

Occasionally people ask very close to new price as they have literally never used the item but they forget that the buyer then has no warrenty with the item. Saw one of this class about a month back.

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It depends how much you want it,before some one

else buys it.If you want it, you pay the money.

I bought a Mead 2" Flip Mirror.Never come

across another one,so I just paid the asking

price .It is only a bargain, if you really want it.

Steve

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Two thirds for most items if in fine condition, three quarters for particularly sought after stuff (think black and green). Sliding downwards scale for worn/scruffychipped/damaged gear. If optics are damaged, a clear report/statement of fault, and a price around one quarter-one third for eyepieces etc.

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Its kind of down to what the seller believes its worth.  For budget gear the price drop will always be a bit higher and some equipment does suffer particularly savage depreciation (I am thinking Orion Optics scopes but also some other stuff as well).

Some stuff will tend to hold its value far better - Pentax and Televue eyepieces for instance and in some cases (but rarely) prices may be more expensive 2nd hand because thats all there is and the price may be a bit steep compared to new - ZAO Orthos would be a case in point.

Just like anything else thats geeky astro is subject to trends and fancies - this week its 100' eyepieces next week its classic orthos etc - and this all feeds into the price.  Sometimes a bargain can be had because a seller is uninterested or unaware of the value and sometimes people get ripped off because the buyer is not aware enough - and plenty of tat goes through ebay with people paying more than a new price for some stuff which is sad. SOme stuff can be had cheap because it doesn't meet the fad of the week.  TAL telescopes for instance a few years ago....... then they go up because people wake up to how good they are just about when  the manufacturer stops making them :)

I always think of astro rather like pianos (which were the business of an uncle of mine) which suffer a similar large discrepancy in 2nd hand pricing - people either think their piano is worth a fortune because 'its a piano mate - they cost a lot'  and don't take into account they have a banger thats only real value is firewood, sometimes they have something wonderful but just want rid of it because its taking up too much space :) "I only use it to stand some pictures on" :)

Astro like any techy market place can be a minefield.  One only has to read a forum and see the inevitable 'I dropped my telescope' and 'I took an eyepiece to bits and now I cant re-assamble it' to know that some of this stuff will make its way to the 2nd hand market so its very much a case of buyer beware.  I have seen some real horrors in my time for sure including plenty of spare drainpipes on ebay masquearding as 'priceless antiques and veritable jewels of our scientific and astronomy heritage' latterly used as part of a combination drain, garbage bin, spider sanctuary etc.

People who look after their stuff and know its value generally want a decent whack for it at the 70% end of the spectrum but some folk will be so all fired up to get the 'latest' they will dump price on what they have just so they can rush down the shop and buy this weeks fad :)

Edited by Astro_Baby
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Wow, thanks for all the replies in a short space of time.

Thinking a bit more, I personally feel about 65 - (maybe) 75% for a good and sought after scope, maybe 65% for a mount (lots of electronics to go wrong) and less for higher volume items like cameras, (average) eyepieces, finder scopes etc.

Seems a little negotiation with sellers will be in order as I piece together a shopping list to get into AstroPhotography

Chris

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I generally agree with the 60%-70% figure, provided the kit is in good, clean and fully working condition. Any sort of damage can knock the price considerably though. There are also some exceptions where the price on the used market seems to be somewhat lower and I'm thinking of Orion Optics scopes which seem to depreciate quite substantially and also chinese achromat refractors such as the 120mm F/8.3 and the 150mm F/8's which can be had for well below 50% of the new cost.

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I always want something for half the retail price, because it probably cost less to make anyway. So If I see something I want, If I can get it half the price, I will, or as close as.  Thats the biggest problem with retail these Days, and why small & large business's  go out of fashion, as they just cant compete with what's available on-line. 

Its what your prepared to pay what counts. Buying anything less than retail make you feel good, a sense of accomplishment.  I  once sold a Toy bus for £45.oo?  With hindsight and what I now know, I could have sold that for £400 to £4000+ to the right collector? There were ONLY 10 available.  Yes only 10 ever produced, it was the 1933 Penny of the Toy Bus World,  and they were not even produced for retail?  unless someone tried to make a copy or clone, but mine was an original. 

On the same token If I`m selling something, I`ll start at 50% of the retail price and try and get as much as I can. How often do you see FREE postage in ebay. Makes you think that your getting something for nothing, makes you feel good. The postage is just incorporated in the sellers auction so no loss to the seller. They have had their use, and just want as much as possible.

So whatever method or percentage you buy/sell, as long as your happy with that sum, and the goods are fit for purpose, result.

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I always want something for half the retail price, because it probably cost less to make anyway. So If I see something I want, If I can get it half the price, I will, or as close as.  Thats the biggest problem with retail these Days, and why small & large business's  go out of fashion, as they just cant compete with what's available on-line. 

Its what your prepared to pay what counts. Buying anything less than retail make you feel good, a sense of accomplishment.  I  once sold a Toy bus for £45.oo?  With hindsight and what I now know, I could have sold that for £400 to £4000+ to the right collector? There were ONLY 10 available.  Yes only 10 ever produced, it was the 1933 Penny of the Toy Bus World,  and they were not even produced for retail?  unless someone tried to make a copy or clone, but mine was an original. 

On the same token If I`m selling something, I`ll start at 50% of the retail price and try and get as much as I can. How often do you see FREE postage in ebay. Makes you think that your getting something for nothing, makes you feel good. The postage is just incorporated in the sellers auction so no loss to the seller. They have had their use, and just want as much as possible.

So whatever method or percentage you buy/sell, as long as your happy with that sum, and the goods are fit for purpose, result.

It isn't really no cost to the seller, as they wouldn't pay the fee's on postage, where they do on the purchase price, but I do see your point.

Generally I consider second hand value to be marginally above 50% for most things in good condition, in the 18-36 month range you are talking about.  A little more for newer second hand stuff, probably not much less for older, until you start looking at serious drops in technology (For example, a 4 year old budget DSLR will be worth substantially less than 50% of it's new price).

Some stuff, however, really do depreciate little.  I use electronic cigarettes, and some of the more advanced stuff might only depreciate by around 10-20% over a year or so.  Personally, I would rather buy new in these instances, but the second hand market is thriving just the same.  So what fits one technology, with regards to second hand pricing, doesn't fit all.

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I agree on the 60-70 also, however there are soem scopes which are out of production and worth far more than there original price tag, boxed mint condition Zeis Telementor II's for example, these can fetch a high price, other OOP APO's with heritage quiet often go for very high prices too.

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Just as an aside to this - I've had 5 scopes in total - 4 have been second hand and one new. The one that gave me un-sortable problems was the new scope - An utter crock. The second hand ones have all been top class. I'd never buy a new scope again.

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60% to 70% of the current new price for me, assuming that the item is in top condition. I have never failed to sell good quality, well kept gear at that rate although I have been plagued by chancers, especially on ABS !!

I bought something off ABS recently and the guy who I bought it from said that the number of people who contacted him offering an absolutely ridiculous low price was quite insulting, he didn't even respond to them. Knocking the price down a little is fair enough because it is usually expected but don't be an idiot (I am talking about 10% of the original value).

There has been a Canon 15-85mm lens on ABS for what seems like forever at a "really low price", note that the price hasn't changed since day 1. If it was really that low it would have sold a long time ago (unless it is a dealer with a box full of them and is selling them off).

Just as an aside to this - I've had 5 scopes in total - 4 have been second hand and one new. The one that gave me un-sortable problems was the new scope - An utter crock. The second hand ones have all been top class. I'd never buy a new scope again.

Shhhh Sara, we don't want to dry up the 2nd hand market :grin:

As mentioned already, a 2nd/3rd/etc hand item is only worth as much as someone is willing to pay for it.

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xs2man.....point taken, and on re-reading the thread, its  obvious to me that  during editing, I removed too many sentences? It should have  said something like...


" I want something for half the retail prices" .........and free postage! ( not that I'm greedy - But I have issues with my postal code here, so I fight for every  pound and penny where I can ).

If there is FREE postage for you as the 'buyer',  then I,  as the 'seller', will still have to pay some postage, therefore I incorporate that in my fixed price to get the best value to cover ebay/paypal/packaging fees and whatever is left over for myself for the goods is my reward.  Its only FREE postage to you, because Its a trick, as like myself, I think I'm getting value for my money, but your still covering my costs if I set a minimum price for my auction. 


No Loss - Costs to the seller?  apologies for any confusion.

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Wow, thanks for all the replies in a short space of time.

Thinking a bit more, I personally feel about 65 - (maybe) 75% for a good and sought after scope, maybe 65% for a mount (lots of electronics to go wrong) and less for higher volume items like cameras, (average) eyepieces, finder scopes etc.

Seems a little negotiation with sellers will be in order as I piece together a shopping list to get into AstroPhotography

Chris

If the item is  in good working condition has not been abused then work on about  2/3 of the new price for mainstream items, telescopes, ccds, etc. The rest of the stuff really depends on how much you are willing to pay for them. Reasonably priced items do not last long and get sold quickly but I have seen greedy sellers and also unreasonable buyers that want to pick everything for next to nothing and also the time wasters.

A.G

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