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Dyptorden

Planet Light Pollution Filter

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Hi everyone, and welcome to this new year :)

A new... question for a new year:

Any of you can suggest nice/good/best LP filter for viewing planets (not DSO's <such as DGM NPB etc.>)?

As far as I have seen, the best 2 ones would be from Baader : The Neodymium and the Contrast Booster. Although they say that the filters increase the planet's contrast, I don't see much about mitigating the light pollution (mainly from artificial sources... sodium, mercury etc.)

My main targets would be Jupiter & Saturn.

Thank you,

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There "were" LP filters that did a reasonable job, however the nature of light pollution has altered.

The originals blocked the 2 Sodium lines that were emitted by the many yellow sodium lights. That was relatively easy as it was just a case of block a small bit of the spectrum and let the rest through and 90% of the LP went.

However LP has altered. a lot is now simply white light from halogen lighting (security) and now from LED street lights. This cannot realistically be blocked. To "block" it would mean in effect putting the scope cover back on.

To attempt any blocking you need to have an idea of the sources and wavelengths that are causing the problem. Also remember that removing even the Na Yellow means that you have upset the balance of the spectrum

Have read that the IDAS LPS P1 and/or P2 are good - one better then the other, I think the LP2 geing the better but I do not have the filter curves for that one.

However the filter curves are a bit complex so as said needs to be matched to your light pollution sources.

Back to the fact that if 50% of the LP is removed then those wavelengths from the object are also blocked - the object is now dimmer. A filter blocks/removes the specified wavelengths immaterial of the source.

The other aspect is that what you find "good" others will find "poor".

Have seen some people say OIII is good and the one to get and others say OIII does very little and not worth bothering with.

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Hi,

AStronomik CLS ones in my opinion are the best, and other people may agree.....this one also,has the IR cut built in also which is really needs for planetary work and or CCD imaging, so would be a superb al rounder.

And there is one for sale on astro buy and sell here the 1.25" which would be perfect for you needs, I was going to buy myself but am getting the 2" version instead now

http://www.astrobuysell.com/uk/propview.php?view=91530

Happy new year

:)

SS

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Hi everyone, and welcome to this new year :)

A new... question for a new year:

Any of you can suggest nice/good/best LP filter for viewing planets (not DSO's <such as DGM NPB etc.>)?

As far as I have seen, the best 2 ones would be from Baader : The Neodymium and the Contrast Booster. Although they say that the filters increase the planet's contrast, I don't see much about mitigating the light pollution (mainly from artificial sources... sodium, mercury etc.)

My main targets would be Jupiter & Saturn.

Thank you,

The two filters you mention are not really LP filters, the AStronomik one is and it is specifically for the pollution you mention, check it out on Astronomiks website

SS

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thank you SkySurfer.

But what I see on their site : http://www.astronomik.com/en/visual-filters/cls-filter.html is "Visual observation (urban skies): Good, an UHC-E or UHC filter is more suitable" so maybe I should buy the UHC instead?

Also, could I get better result if I stack the UCH/CLS with the Baader Contrast Booster?

And one more thing, they also say on their site, that both UHC and CLS are also good for nebulae. I was thinking to go for the DGM NPB for nebulae. Then... could the DGM help me with planets too?

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I have never found LIGHT pollution a problem with visual planetary observation, on the contrary some light pollution tones down the brightness of Jupiter and Saturn which can swamp the finer detail, viewing fainter moons such as those of Saturn are of course compromised.   :smiley: 

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May depend on what you're viewing with.

The contrast booster is, as I understand it, a neodymium filter plus an extra layer to cut the blue wavelengths a bit more that worsen contrast if you're using an achromatic frac or short fl frac.

Chris

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thank you SkySurfer.

But what I see on their site : http://www.astronomik.com/en/visual-filters/cls-filter.html is "Visual observation (urban skies): Good, an UHC-E or UHC filter is more suitable" so maybe I should buy the UHC instead?

Also, could I get better result if I stack the UCH/CLS with the Baader Contrast Booster?

And one more thing, they also say on their site, that both UHC and CLS are also good for nebulae. I was thinking to go for the DGM NPB for nebulae. Then... could the DGM help me with planets too?

You are looking at the visual version, not the CCD version which is the one I pointed out, here is a link to it on another site

https://www.widescreen-centre.co.uk/Products/Astronomik_CLS-CCD_Filter_.html

Regards

SS

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Even in this link you provided it says:

"

  • Visual observation (urban skies): Reasonable, an UHC-E or UHC filter is more suitable

"

i'm a bit confused...

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Even in this link you provided it says:

"

  • Visual observation (urban skies): Reasonable, an UHC-E or UHC filter is more suitable

"

i'm a bit confused...

Yes it can be used for all in that list on the site, but if you look closely it says only "good" for visual and a bit further down it says "very good" for CCD imaging, like I say it is an all round filter, but better when used for imaging, I thought that is what you were after, a very good LP filter to,use when planetary imaging....??

Have I missed something here?

:) :)

SS

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thank you SkySurfer.

But what I see on their site : http://www.astronomik.com/en/visual-filters/cls-filter.html is "Visual observation (urban skies): Good, an UHC-E or UHC filter is more suitable" so maybe I should buy the UHC instead?

Also, could I get better result if I stack the UCH/CLS with the Baader Contrast Booster?

And one more thing, they also say on their site, that both UHC and CLS are also good for nebulae.

Only my limited experience but I have the Baader Neodymium and a UHC, and an Astronomik UHC (the 'budget' one) - I use the UHC's far more than the Neo... They just seem to be better all-rounders for me.

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