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I never get tired of ogling the Orion Nebula, and now I wanted to share one of my first astrophotos of the beautiful star making factory. A simple, single 30 sec. exposure shot on my trusty old Nikon D50 using my Orion StarMax 127 as a glorified telephoto lens. Fun stuff!  :smiley:

ASTRONOMY-ORIONNEBULACAPTION12-25-14.jpg

Astronomical evenings,

Reggie

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nothing better than the "irresistible" M42 to light the astro-imager in you. a great target imaging wise and visually! great to hear you enjoying it.

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Lovely spotted it for the first time yesterday.

It never fails to please; you'll find yourself returning again and again  :smiley:

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nothing better than the "irresistible" M42 to light the astro-imager in you. a great target imaging wise and visually! great to hear you enjoying it.

Thanks, my friend!  :smiley:

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M42 must be the most enigmatic object in the sky.  Very bright so easy to capture at least something to get you hooked but with the greatest luminance range, way above what can be captured with a camera with one exposure setting.  You need short exposures for the trapezium stars in the centre and long exposures to capture the deep (mianly Ha) nebulosity that surrounds it.  Stacks of these can be processed as layers to combine and reduce the overall dynamic range to something our monitors can handle.  Getting the processing right so that the main part doesn't lack contrast and look washed out while showing the nebulosity is extremely difficult.

Yes, glad you're enjoying it :)

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M42 must be the most enigmatic object in the sky.  Very bright so easy to capture at least something to get you hooked but with the greatest luminance range, way above what can be captured with a camera with one exposure setting.  You need short exposures for the trapezium stars in the centre and long exposures to capture the deep (mianly Ha) nebulosity that surrounds it.  Stacks of these can be processed as layers to combine and reduce the overall dynamic range to something our monitors can handle.  Getting the processing right so that the main part doesn't lack contrast and look washed out while showing the nebulosity is extremely difficult.

Yes, glad you're enjoying it :)

Thanks, Gina! And thanks for your guidance :laugh:

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