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Betelgeuse should we get under the bed?

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Apologies, but Kropster did suggest  on the whats a billion thread that i should come up with an other puzzle as its going to be a wet night , soooooo   not so much a puzzle as a query, having watched Brian cox rerun today when he was talking about the likelyhood of betelgeuse going nova at some point possibly even the near future would we all literally die happy as in it would do the earth some mortal damage? or will it simply be a wonderous sight to behold? personally  i like Orion the way it is.

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I think the only way it could pose a risk would be if it went GRB with the axis pointed straight at us, otherwise it will "only" be staggering. Think point of light as bright as a full moon.

Bother, there goes observing for the duration, though whether it will be visible through the inevitable cloud is another matter.

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If it were about to go nova how would it's colour change in the preceeding few weeks/years ?

I dont want to start a panic but - :)

when I was young and learning the sky/constellations way back ( in the '50s ! ) it was said to look for the orange star in Orion.

Well ok it was a little more orange than the rest of the stars in the sky and Rigel was a little more blue/white with a bit of imagination but not, I thought, dramatic.

Now B.is glowing distinctly orange, no mistake ! It stands out.

I thought it might be my old eyes but I have questioned my daughter frequently about what colours she sees in the stars and most get a bit of a 'maybe' shrug but she does describe B. as very orange, much more positive than I would have described it to my dad all those years ago !!

So I dunno , , ,

:)

maybe it could be down to global warming or pollution or summat ?

Edited by Ptarmigan

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Fortunately when Betelgeuse goes Supernova it will have no effect on the Earth. It will be very bright in the sky but as it may not happen for another million years, I doubt anyone will see it.

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We've had a few of these Betelgeuse/Supernova threads in the past year or two, and I always find them fascinating.  It's so easy to say things like "what if it suddenly goes supernova", meaning from the point of view of what we see here of course, but when I think about it, I never cease to be amazed at the simple fact that if it suddenly goes tomorrow, then it would have actually gone supernova over 600 years ago.  This is when Henry V became king of England!

It would be sad to lose the old girl.  As one of the stars that I use to get my bearings she's like family and I would really miss her, but who could honestly say they would say no to the opportunity to witness a supernova at such a close (but most likely safe) range? 

This reminded me of great series of images Olly posted in an earlier thread on the same subject.  A 'before, during and after' set of three.  I've just been digging around in the archives and found it.  I hope you don't mind Olly, but I'd like to post a link for anyone who didn't see them.  :smiley:  

Have a look at this.  :smiley:

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Fortunately when Betelgeuse goes Supernova it will have no effect on the Earth. 

,,,,

I doubt anyone will see it.

Maybe not on the earth, but what of the peoples of the earth, look at the trouble the Star of Bethlehem caused !!!

,,,,

Pessimist !

Edited by Ptarmigan

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As I understand the danger lies in that we actually are in line of sight of its pole... of course I'd bet against humanity still being around, but who knows. Personally, I'd LOVED to be around for our demise. What I wicked cool time to be alive.

Edited by Liquid360

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There has not been a supernova in our galaxy since the invention of the telescope (was the crab 1000+ years ago the last?). As they average about one evry 100 yrs per galaxy we are well overdue one so if not Betelgeuse then there will hopefully be another soon.

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What always gets me about Betelgeuse going nova is the simple fact that some one will be looking at it through a scope when it goes, and when they yell not a person within hearing range will believe them. :eek: :eek: :grin: :grin:

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I walked out of my back door one night recently and, glancing up at the sky, saw a bright light right in the direction of Orion out of the corner of my eye. I actually panicked for a second - not from fear but about what to do to tell everybody!

Anyway, a split-second later I realised it was completely overcast, and the light was from a plane heading into Gatwick. I was actually quite relieved!

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If I recall Cox said it would be so bright it would cast a shadow on a par with the Moon. It is the problem with trying to relate astronomy to the human level, when I hear that Betelgeuse's demise is imminent I think "next week, next month?" and yes it could well be, but it could also be another million years. Hmph.

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Hide under the bed !!!! Of course not go out and enjoy the sight. Under the bed or stood in a field if it's going to kill us why hide.

Mark

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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As I understand the danger lies in that we actually are in line of sight of its pole... of course I'd bet against humanity still being around, but who knows. Personally, I'd LOVED to be around for our demise. What I wicked cool time to be alive.

Are we?  It was my understanding that we're nowhere near its pole.

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We've had a few of these Betelgeuse/Supernova threads in the past year or two, and I always find them fascinating.  It's so easy to say things like "what if it suddenly goes supernova", meaning from the point of view of what we see here of course, but when I think about it, I never cease to be amazed at the simple fact that if it suddenly goes tomorrow, then it would have actually gone supernova over 600 years ago.  This is when Henry V became king of England!

It would be sad to lose the old girl.  As one of the stars that I use to get my bearings she's like family and I would really miss her, but who could honestly say they would say no to the opportunity to witness a supernova at such a close (but most likely safe) range? 

This reminded me of great series of images Olly posted in an earlier thread on the same subject.  A 'before, during and after' set of three.  I've just been digging around in the archives and found it.  I hope you don't mind Olly, but I'd like to post a link for anyone who didn't see them.  :smiley:  

Have a look at this.  :smiley:

Well theres no need for it to blow now, we have all seen it. Long live Beatlejuice.

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You are correct sir! Was going of old data. Dang it!! I wish we were in line... C'est la vive. Thanks for the correction!

Are we? It was my understanding that we're nowhere near its pole.

Edited by Liquid360

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You are correct sir! Was going of old data. Dang it!! I wish we were in line... C'est la vive. Thanks for the correction!

What we have since moved out of its polar alignment?  Just how old was your data??  ;p

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No, more studying was done which showed we weren't in line. I got my info from an older (late 90's-early 0's?) doc on the Science Channel. I can't be more specific. I'm sorry!! It's why I said "as I understand it" and obviously I did not [emoji4]

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By all means go and hide under your bed if you'd prefer lol

Me, I'm wiv the others, I'd be outside to watch the show as I'm being disintergrated - if that was really the case, which of cause it won't be with big Betty.

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I think the only way it could pose a risk would be if it went GRB with the axis pointed straight at us, otherwise it will "only" be staggering. 

That is / was my impression - GRBs were but particular instances of Supernovae.

If you are unlucky enough to be downwind of the polar axis? :o

Otherwise, enjoy the show, I suppose...

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And being so close, we should get a brilliant view of a SNR as it forms.

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