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TSG

Beginner Scope Advice

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Hi all, I'm hoping to buy my first telescope later today (a Skymaster Skyliner 200P) but as a total beginner I'm unsure about what accessories I might need to get optimum use from the 'scope. I've read various reviews that mention filters, additional eyepieces (Barlows?), upgrading the finder scope, Telrad (?) etc but I haven't a clue if these are really necessary &, more to the point, if they are necessary, which one(s) to buy? Hope someone out there can advise. Any help much appreciated.

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Hi TSG and welcome to SGL :)

I'd say maybe leave the accessories until you get to grips with your scope.

One thing you will need is a collimation aid. A Cheshire collimator would be my recommendation though some people prefer a laser one.

Best of luck and clear skies :)

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Hi Jim. Thanks for the welcome & the prompt reply. OK, that sounds reasonable. I'm sure the EP's provided will be more than adequate for the time being. Can I just quickly ask your opinion on my choice of 'scope? I've read as much as I can & I know it's had excellent reviews. Basically, I'm not a "Techy" person & didn't fancy a GOTO as a 1st 'scope & the SS sounds very straightforward. I'll take your advice on the collimation aid though. Thanks for your help & guidance. I can already see that SGL is going to be invaluable to me!

All the best & clear skies [emoji4][emoji437]

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I would say like Jim a Cheshire to colliminate the scope which is a task your going to have to master, also I would add a rigel quickfinder or telrad finder and a Copy of Turn left at Orion.

I have also included a pdf explaining collimnation.

Collimation of Newtonian Telescopes-1.pdf

Edited by daiwelly

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Ah, OK daiwelly, thanks. I already have TL@O & a Planisphere, but not been able to get to grips with them yet as I'm currently only using 10 x 50 bins. Very much looking forward to getting the 'scope up & running & doing a bit of star-hopping! Will definitely get the Cheshire today & a Telrad in due course. Thanks for the advice - much appreciated.

Tony G

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And thanks for the pdf too!! [emoji106][emoji437]

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The 200p Dob is Britains best selling scope, and with good reason. Excellent piece of kit.

I'd advise the same as above, łeave eyepieces, filters etc and enjoy the scope as is. A collimator, a red torch, Sky atlass, a seat, some warm clothes and a flask of hot drink is all you need got the time being.

Clear skies and enjoy yourself out there. :)

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Your new scope is a very good choice indeed and its one of the most popular scopes being sold today.

You will get excellent views of the planets and dso targets.

After having mine a few months I upgraded the eyepieces to bst ones which work great. A decent Barlow is also a good purchase when the funds allows.

The only problem I personally had with the scope was with the straight through finder scope which due to recent surgery I found uncomfortable to use. Once I purchased a right angle finder to replace the stock one then all was well and dandy.

I have since upgraded to the goto flextube type of one, but that was only because it was a deal I couldn't refuse but it's still the same views as the old one but easier for me to use.

Im sure once you get used to the scope then you will understand why its so popular.

Good luck.

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I'm so glad I found SGL!! I can see that thanking everyone individually for their kind help & advice could be a full-time job, so hope a general THANKS TO YOU ALL will suffice. So good to know that so much help & guidance is so close at hand. Much appreciated. Tony G [emoji106][emoji437][emoji3]

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As already said at some time you will need a collimator, the scope drifts out of alignment and you need to check and realign. It should arrive aligned fairly well but no guarantee of that.

Read up on aligning the finder and main scope, that is likely to be the first thing to do.

Use the 25mm eyepiece and something about 2 miles away to do the finder alignment with.

Take out the 2" adaptor in the focuser then fit the 1.25" adaptor for the eyepieces. Otherwise you will be posting here that you cannot get the scope to focus and people will ask if you have removed the 2" adaptor.

Eyepieces, well use what comes but you will want better or more pretty fast. For a scope I think 4 eyepieces are required and they give 2. I generally select on f number as yours is f/6 makes it a little difficult.

Using the BST EP's: 5mm, 8mm, 15mm, 25mm.  You may/will not use the 5mm much but it is there.

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Thanks Ronin.

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Take out the 2" adaptor in the focuser then fit the 1.25" adaptor for the eyepieces. Otherwise you will be posting here that you cannot get the scope to focus and people will ask if you have removed the 2" adaptor.

Why oh why is there no mention of this in any of the manuals, it would save newcomers so much grief.

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If you've got TelRad, than you may want to look into a Telrad Riser  (2" or 4"; I got 4" and am very happy) it'll make your life easier. And also think  of a good observing chair, you can even make it yourself if you have some basic skills and tools. There is a lot of info across the web including the detailed instructions, e.g.  the Denver Observer's Seat . I can't imagine myself without the chair :grin:.

As for eyepieces I agree with others, the 25mm and the 10mm you've got are good as a starter set assuming that you also got a 2x Barlow. Later on when you get familiar with the sky and figure out your object preferences you may want to upgrade your eyepiece collection. The ideal minimal lineup for a 200mm f/6 Dob would be like 35mm-24mm-12mm-8mm-6mm. If you get  a 1.5x/2x Barlow, than it can convert the 12mm eyepiece into the three, 12mm, 8mm (1.5x) and 6mm (2x).

Hope that helps. Enjoy your new scope!

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Thanks for the link for the denver observers seat next job in the New Year. :coffee2:

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