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Lewis H

Collimation Problems

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Now I'm sure that there are already 100's of posts identical to this one, so I apologize in advance for that.

Anyway, I use a laser collimator when collimating my SW Explorer 200p and the laser is way off of the centre point of the primary mirror. Because of this I tried to adjust the 3 screws on the secondary mirror, but each time I try to do so, the laser point goes back to the same point and it appears as if it isn't moving. I am applying pressure when trying to adjust the screws, but I don't want to push too hard in case something breaks. My scope has been like this for weeks now, and I don't collimate it often because I only tend to take it into the garden 10ft away. 

If anybody can give me any suggestions as to what I should do or if I'm doing something wrong (which no doubt I probably am) then I would be very greatful. 

Thanks.

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Have you collimated your laser collimator? Easiest way is to bang nails into a piece of wood to form a cross at two points  to support the collimator, with one nail at the end, to stop it slipping backwards. Aim the collimator at a wall 20ft away and rotate the collimator and adjust the screws until the "dot" stays in the same place.

Ian

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You shouldn't have to apply much pressure to turn them. Try loosening two slightly and then tighten the other one, and repeat the process to move the laser in the direction you want it. When you've finished tighten them all slightly.

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It's likely that the laser itself needs collimating, however, with the secondary mirror you don't need the laser, just look down the focuser without an eyepiece, and see if the secondary mirror looks perfectly round, and also that you can see the three primary mirror clips in the same view, this will indicate that the secondary is well aligned with the primary.  Only then go ahead with aligning the primary.  Personnally I prefer using a Cheshire Collimater Sight Tube, as I think they are more reliable.

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