Jump to content

sgl_imaging_challenge_6_banner_jupiter_2021.jpg.eacb9f0c2f90fdaafda890646b3fc199.jpg

 

 

Our nameless moon


Nathan_Pembs
 Share

Recommended Posts

It is an interesting question and its not the only one, what about the Sun :eek: I like Alpha Centauri  but it's been used once.  :rolleyes:

Sol, the Latin name of the main-sequence star of the synonymous Sol System, called the sun in English

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I know this doesn't really answer the question, but each month's full moon has got a name.

Jan ...Wolf moon

Feb...Snow

Mar....Worm

Apr......Pink

May....Flower

June....Strawberry

July....Buck

Aug....Sturgeon

Sept......Harvest

Oct....Hunter

Nov.....Beaver

Dec....Cold

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Nice thought :grin:

Playing around a little :p

The word 'Moon' is the name we have given to the object of perception that our nervous system has abstracted but the name is not the object; it merely stands for the object. And even then it doesn't do that too well. I mean, there's more to the Moon than the 'Moon' itself.

The name lunar isn't the Moon either, nor is it the 'Moon' but clearly, it is associated with both the Moon and the 'Moon'. But that doesn't really explain why we don't have Moon eclipses.

And if one studies the Moon's surface, what are they doing? Moonology? Naaaa. Lunology. Naaaa. Wait for it........Selenology  :shocked:  Selene! You're having a laugh, mate  :laugh:

Nevertheless, the Moon isn't just any old moon. It is the Moon. So it does have a name. Words like Gaia for the Earth or Luna for the Moon are for poetic or hippy uses :grin:

Thank goodness I live in the Milky Way. Oh, hang on. Do I live in the Milky Way or the Galaxy? Isn't the Milky Way that band of light I see over head on dark nights? And the Galaxy is the Galaxy? When folk say they saw the Milky Way, what are they referring to...?

It's late, I'm going to bed :smiley:

Edited by Qualia
  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Luna and Sol used as proper names stand out like a sore thumb in a Dutch text. And we have words like maansverduisteringen and zonsverduisteringen: Moon eclipses and Sun eclipses. 

The Moon, Earth, Sun and atmosphere, being the only representatives in each of their categories,  have no proper names in any of the Indo-European languages, including Latin. The Latin words Luna, Sol and Terra simply mean the Moon, the Sun and the Earth. Three times a noun.

I'm happy with these things having no name. Though Mun might be a nice name for the Moon.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

What are you guys on lol. The Moon has a name and it is ..............wait for it................wait for it............its "The Moon". It was called the Moon long before mankind knew of the presence of any other satellite bodies in the solar system. When we discovered others they were referred to as Jupiters or Saturns moons etc simply because they were the equivalent of our own satellite which we call the Moon. Even after we named many of these other satellites we still refer to them as moons probably because if you said satelites to the layman they would start to conjure all sorts of strange visions and the conspiracy brigade would be all over it.

Oh and that big star we orbit also has a name, its called "THE SUN" (not to be confused with a gutter press daily). 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I know this doesn't really answer the question, but each month's full moon has got a name.

But all those full Moons that are the second in a month have to share the name "Blue Moon".  Always the bridesmaid, never the bride, eh?

James

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.