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Some things are better seen with your own eyes...


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Full moon nights are time for doubles and the moon itself. And a time for the eyeball, not a camera sensor. Albireo was the first object I saw through a telescope that really grabbed my full attention, and it hasn't let go since, so it has a special status for me. Images don't do it the justice that seeing with your own eyes does as I found out this week. I should have known!!!

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I too love Albireo and it was first double.

But to me it's eyeball all the way. Don't get me wrong I think the images on this site are outstanding for amateur APs (I even like the images I've taken with my phone), and I admire the time and money they put into it.

But to me it's all about the eyeball (and yes I realise we use mirrors and lenses). The first time I set up my scope I pointed it at the lightest thing in the sky. It happened to be Jupiter, wooooowoooo, and what's that, yes it's 4 stars in a line on one sides, no, can't be, moons, wooooowoooo.

I am looking at these fron a balcony on my house, amazing man, Jupiter, I'm looking at Jupiter.

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Although I spend 90% of my time imaging, there are some objects that just look better through the eyepiece.  Kemble's Cascade is stunning though a low power eyepiece, or binoculars, but I have never managed to take a photo that does it justice.  Many open clusters are best enjoyed visually as well.

There are times when the best thing to do is put the imaging kit away and just look at the night sky.

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Discussing nice doubles, I like the head of Delphinus (Gamma I think) and also Iota Cas, which was the first multiple star system I ever saw, which was through my own Dob on a lovely evening in my front drive, dodging car lights, going through the doubles listed in Turn Left at Orion. Not had many better viewing sessions! Saw Struve 60 as well as mentioned above (eventually!!), which is definitely a little hidden away stunner.

Edited by MattJenko
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The thought that those photons that hit your retina could have travelled millions of miles does it for me.

Having said that, when I find something beautiful I want to "capture" it and keep it. Perhaps a mixture of visual and imaging is the way to go rather than getting entrenched in one or the other.

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The thought that those photons that hit your retina could have travelled millions of miles does it for me.

Not true if there is a mirror anywhere in your optical train of course! It always amuses me that a photon has managed to travel trillions and trillions of miles but falls short by a few inches.[emoji2]

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The great thing about Albireo is that it's so easy to point out to visitors/guests/jo pub.

"See that star up there, it's actually two."

Then the, "Wow," as they see it through the 'scope, "they're different colours!"

Fab.  :smiley:

Yep - agree

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