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Hey guys, I have another question.. 

I'm going to get a Doctorate in Astronomy & Physics, I was wondering if someone could tell me what courses I need to do to get ready for Astronomy and Physics. Trying to prepare for College is frustrating, and i'm getting nowhere. Please help? :(

Any help is appreciated, thanks!

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Once you get to the college/university, you will be assigned an adviser. The adviser will explain your required load of courses to achieve your goal, and the elective courses available to you as well.

Getting a Phd. is a lofty ideal, and will require you excelling in the lower echelon courses on your way. So don't burn-out on your way to your prize. Take advantage of your adviser's counsel and go step-by-step. You'll go far.

Clear Skies & Lofty Ambitions,

Dave (who used to live out of MIT and Harvard :eek: )

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Once you get to the college/university, you will be assigned an adviser. The adviser will explain your required load of courses to achieve your goal, and the elective courses available to you as well.

Getting a Phd. is a lofty ideal, and will require you excelling in the lower echelon courses on your way. So don't burn-out on your way to your prize. Take advantage of your adviser's counsel and go step-by-step. You'll go far.

Clear Skies & Lofty Ambitions,

Dave (who used to live out of MIT and Harvard :eek: )

Thank you :3

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Literally if you're good at maths you'll be good for physics/astro, so take as much maths as you can!

Actually, I know people who were good at maths, but only excelled at the theoretical side of physics. Experimental set-ups seized up the moment they touched them. Whenever they were in the electronics lab the smell of scorched silicon was never far away :D. Having said that, it is well known that even a famous theoretical physicist in the lab can derail your experiments. For Wolfgang Pauli, it was enough to have him in the same city to scupper experiements. The leading theory is that theoretical physicists carry particles sometimes called gremlins which come in flavours "crash", "burn", "flood", "break", and "short-circuit" ;)

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You will need Maths and for many aspects these days computing and coding - probably in C or C++.

May be an odd way of putting it but there is likely only a little astronomy in getting an Astronomy qualification these days. It will/is processing data, and that data will come from things like the JW Telescope, Gaia etc. Even if the data is from earth stations like the E-ELT whern it comes on line you will request time and the gathered data will be made available, also it is made available after it has been processed by whatever the observatory computers and algorithms have done to clean it up.

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A (non-Brian Cox) Particle Physicist's perspective here: Although you have to be "good at maths", I AGREE(?) with BC, that general enthusiasm for Science might make up to less than stellar abilities in Maths. He got a "D"... I got a "C" at A-Level <meow> :D

Not so familiar with Astronomy, but certainly Particle Physics needs people to build and test things!

General (hobbyist!) abilities in programming and electronics as well as the "academic" subjects...

Can you program a PC (Arduino etc.) Can you wield a soldering iron - Drill a hole, if need be... :cool:

An ability to convey your mad-cap ideas to technicians and engineers as EQUALS - To "muck in"

and "get your hands dirty" (cable dragging etc.) when required! If you work with an international

collaboration, no bad thing to work on that Schoolboy / girl French / German / Whatever, too...  ;)

Don't forget to allow *some* FUN time outside work / study

Sadly "studenting" seems rather less fun these days... :o

Edited by Macavity
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I agree with Chris, enthusiasm and skill at tinkering are needed to be a physicist or astronomer rather than a pure mathematician, but without math skills you will not get far. Programming, while needed does not figure hugely in the curriculum (that is why they are turning to me (a computer scientist these days) when the coding gets tough :D)

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Certainly, all the mathematics (we don't say "maths" in the States.) you can take - and learn it - don't just take it. Physics as well, but also chemistry is important. It should go without saying that computer skills are important.

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk.

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Certainly, all the mathematics (we don't say "maths" in the States.) you can take - and learn it - don't just take it. Physics as well, but also chemistry is important. It should go without saying that computer skills are important.

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk.

No, you say math. which makes me wonder as it's not called mathematic :evil:

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One other thing I'd add - be really sure that you've thoroughly researched what the courses you undertake will cover. I did a degree in Astronomy because I lived and breathed amateur astronomy from 11 years old onwards. It was all I ever wanted to do. But soon into my course I discovered that there was so much more maths and physics than I'd ever realised, and that really turned me off. I just wanted to look at cool stuff and take pictures! I was great at the (very limited) observational stuff and essay writing, but rubbish at the high level maths and physics. I still got a good degree, simply through hard work and cramming, but it killed my interest in astronomy for around 15 years!

Go in with your eyes open and I'm sure you'll have a fantastic time.

Paul

Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

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Paul's story is a common one. Many avid amateurs select astronomy as their favourite course, but drop out early because they were unaware of the amount of mathematics and physics. Four members of our amateur astronomy club at school chose astronomy as their choice in my first year, but 2 dropped out.

This is not meant to discourage you, it is just a reality you need to be aware of. If you like science and mathematics at school, I am sure you will do well in astronomy

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Hi Eirik, mathematics is probably the most important subject, and the first couple of years study are heavy going, but don’t be put off. My math lecturer said, “if you’re not stuck, then you’re working on something you already know how to do”, and I came to realize she was right.

Remember to keep asking questions: what is it, what does it do, how does it do it, what can I use it for? If you don’t get satisfactory answers, ask elsewhere.

The fun has just begun!

Good Luck, Ray

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