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Astro_Gaz

next image from the modded Nikon D5100 - M31 - Andromeda

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More from my freshly modded nikon D5100, i think im falling in love with this camera

14593128158_be522f3306_c.jpgM31 - Andromeda by Gareth Harding, on Flickr

M31 - Andromeda

Scope: Orion Optics VX6 with 1/10 PV upgraded optics

Guide Scope: Skywatcher ST80

Guide Cam: QHY 5 Mono

Mount: Skywatcher HQE5

Camera: Nikon D5100 Modded

Exposure: 11x5 Minute Subs, Darks, Bias & Flats

Technical: 750mm f/5

Software: DSS, Pixinsight, PHD, Nebulosity

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only had chance to get an hour of data so the image is slightly pushed, and it has coma errors around the edges apart from that its still the best M31 image i've done to date that in mind

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lovely image
been shooting it myself recently but at a lot narrower FOV than you have there
the galaxy fills my scope so I don't get much background sky to make it stand out

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my best effort under difficult skies and limited to 60s subs

post-34443-0-51425000-1406678140_thumb.j

Edited by oldpink
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get yourself an astronomic cls ccd filter mate, most of my images are taken in view of a 24 hour tesco, obviously no substitute for dark skies..... but it helps

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I have a CLS clip filter installed in my Canon, it does help but there is only so much a filter can do
I have a dual carriageway 100m in front of me running east to west the other side of that I have a technology park thats lit up constantly

I can literally sit in my garden at 2 am and read a book its that bright

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Very nice images. The second one looks like the black has been clipped a bit, the sky isn't normally that dark. Either way they are much better than my attempts at M31 so far. Well done. Must get myself a DSLR to modify!

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Love that wild field and I think the camera (and you!) have performed brilliantly on the first image with what is a limited overall exposure time.  Some great dust detail emerging and nice that you've resisted the temptation to over process

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Love that wild field and I think the camera (and you!) have performed brilliantly on the first image with what is a limited overall exposure time.  Some great dust detail emerging and nice that you've resisted the temptation to over process

cheers mate i like to keep my processing as natural as possible so glad its been noticed thanks for the kind feedback

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Nice one mate, I am waiting for a bit later in the year, when it is abit darker, before I go after her!

Must say I prefer the wide field that you have done on this.

Keep up the good work.

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Very nice images. The second one looks like the black has been clipped a bit, the sky isn't normally that dark. Either way they are much better than my attempts at M31 so far. Well done. Must get myself a DSLR to modify!

i was at grizedale forest dark sky park mate, the sky was that dark to be fair 

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