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peroni

Do I need one of these?

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Hi All

I'm in the market for a Skywatcher .85x reducer/flattener (link) to go on my Skywatcher Evostar 80ED DS-Pro (link)

Do I also need one of these? A FLO Adapter for Skywatcher Focal Reducers (link). I don't know what it is for but it is displayed as a related product to the reducer/flattener.

I already have a FLO 2-inch T mount camera adapter (link) which looks exactly the same as the FLO adapter for focal reducers.

Can someone please explain how this all fits together on my scope. Is it...?

scope --> reducer/flattener --> FLO adapter --> Canon T ring --> Canon camera

or

scope --> FLO adapter --> reducer/flattener --> Canon T ring --> Canon camera

How come we need another adapter to get the reducer/flattener to work? Confused ramblings now. Can some please help.

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Well from what I read that reducer will screw directly on the thread on the end of your focuser tube so you don't need the 2" nosepiece adapter. If using the reducer in some other refractor (different end on the focuser tube) then you would need the adapter. The other end of the reducer will screw directly into the T-ring so I guess you don't need anything more.

ChrisH

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Reducer/Flattener's normally have a distance to sensor requirement, might be worth checking out.......

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Well from what I read that reducer will screw directly on the thread on the end of your focuser tube so you don't need the 2" nosepiece adapter. If using the reducer in some other refractor (different end on the focuser tube) then you would need the adapter. The other end of the reducer will screw directly into the T-ring so I guess you don't need anything more.

ChrisH

I've just checked my focuser tube and there is no thread. Perhaps because it is the basic focuser supplied with scope and not an upgraded focuser. This could explain why the FLO adapter is needed. It looks like the connections will be like this...

scope --> FLO adapter --> reducer/flattener --> Canon T ring --> Canon camera

can someone confirm my thoughts?

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Reducer/Flattener's normally have a distance to sensor requirement, might be worth checking out.......

Thanks Tinker. This seems to be a question to FLO. Thought I'd post here first just in case.  :grin:

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Thanks Tinker. This seems to be a question to FLO. Thought I'd post here first just inThat

That should be correct automatically - the T-ring it screws into will provide the correct spacing.

ChrisH

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You need to unscrew the black bit off the end of the focusser to see the threads.

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You need to unscrew the black bit off the end of the focusser to see the threads.

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OK, thanks Stu. I've managed to unscrew the black locking ring to reveal the threads on the silver part of the 80ED focuser tube. Does that mean I won't need to get the FLO adapter and instead the setup will be like this...

scope --> reducer/flattener --> Canon T ring --> Canon camera

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The adapter I think you're referring to is to give the M48-T2 ? In which case yes you need it to stretch the T2-Canon adapter to so it goes

Scope-fr/ff-M48 to T2-T2 Canon adapter-Camera

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I'll try get a picture within the hour...

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Stu is correct. The flattener/reducer will screw directly on the focus tube. You then need a dslr/ m48 adaptor to fit your canon camera on. This will give you the exact spacing required. The other adaptors you linked to are only required if you can't screw the r/f onto the focuser.

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My mistake, the Best adapter is M48 to Canon directly so no T2 required (bottom right on fr/f2f page).

8ahyse5u.jpg

3y6e5a5y.jpg

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Edited by StuW

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You want this to go between the Canon and the back of the reducer:

http://www.firstlightoptics.com/adaptors/skywatcher-dslr-m48-ring-adapter.html

It will give you the exact spacing - it can be split in to two pieces by loosening three small screws so that you can rotate the camera relative to the scope once you have everything screwed together.  It isn't ideal though since you usually want to rotate the camera for framing once you have it on the target, and you definitely don't want to be unscrewing those tiny screws in the dark - easy to drop, hard to locate and tighten up in the dark, easy  to damage the heads, might drop the entire camera on the floor, etc.

The FLO adaptor comes in at the other end of the reducer (http://www.firstlightoptics.com/adaptors/flo-adapter-for-skywatcher-focal-reducers.html) - you put that on the front of the reducer and you can then use it in the 2" focus tube as if it was an eyepiece - so you can rotate the camera more easily.  I wouldn't though personally, the 80ED has two 'comedy thumbscrews' and I would not trust my DSLR and reducer to them, still less anything heavier (even if you replace them with bigger thumbscrews there is not much meat on the threaded holes and they tend to work loose by themselves). Plus the two screw design can make the camera sensor not be orthogonal with the focal plane.

The big plus of the adaptor for me is that it has a 2 inch filter thread on the front of the nosepiece for my LP filter.  The only other options for putting an LP filter in the train are to screw a 2" filter between the back of the reducer and the Canon adaptor (which affects the spacing and creates elongated stars in the corners of the frame), or to go for one of the in-camera clip filter types (which limits the choice of filter and means it can only be used with a Canon).

What I did in the end was go for a Baader Click-Lock like this: http://www.firstlightoptics.com/adaptors/baader-click-lock-2956256-m56-celestron-skywatcher.html

That screws on to the silver thread you have now found, and then you slot the FLO adaptor in to it and rotate the locking handle - rock solid connection and nicely orthogonal due to the brass compression ring mechanism.  Makes it a breeze to rotate the camera.

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I'll try get a picture within the hour...

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@Stu, thanks for the picture. It's really cleared things up.

Search for for dslr/m48 adaptor

@Rob, thanks for confirming the adapter. All this adapters look the same. I have a Canon T ring which looks identical but obviously isn't  :grin:

You want this to go between the Canon and the back of the reducer:

http://www.firstlightoptics.com/adaptors/skywatcher-dslr-m48-ring-adapter.html

It will give you the exact spacing - it can be split in to two pieces by loosening three small screws so that you can rotate the camera relative to the scope once you have everything screwed together.  It isn't ideal though since you usually want to rotate the camera for framing once you have it on the target, and you definitely don't want to be unscrewing those tiny screws in the dark - easy to drop, hard to locate and tighten up in the dark, easy  to damage the heads, might drop the entire camera on the floor, etc.

The FLO adaptor comes in at the other end of the reducer (http://www.firstlightoptics.com/adaptors/flo-adapter-for-skywatcher-focal-reducers.html) - you put that on the front of the reducer and you can then use it in the 2" focus tube as if it was an eyepiece - so you can rotate the camera more easily.  I wouldn't though personally, the 80ED has two 'comedy thumbscrews' and I would not trust my DSLR and reducer to them, still less anything heavier (even if you replace them with bigger thumbscrews there is not much meat on the threaded holes and they tend to work loose by themselves). Plus the two screw design can make the camera sensor not be orthogonal with the focal plane.

The big plus of the adaptor for me is that it has a 2 inch filter thread on the front of the nosepiece for my LP filter.  The only other options for putting an LP filter in the train are to screw a 2" filter between the back of the reducer and the Canon adaptor (which affects the spacing and creates elongated stars in the corners of the frame), or to go for one of the in-camera clip filter types (which limits the choice of filter and means it can only be used with a Canon).

What I did in the end was go for a Baader Click-Lock like this: http://www.firstlightoptics.com/adaptors/baader-click-lock-2956256-m56-celestron-skywatcher.html

That screws on to the silver thread you have now found, and then you slot the FLO adaptor in to it and rotate the locking handle - rock solid connection and nicely orthogonal due to the brass compression ring mechanism.  Makes it a breeze to rotate the camera.

@Ian, thanks for the extra info on securing/rotating the camera. More money to be spent  :grin:

It sounds like a nightmare trying to align the camera with the tiny screws. I'll have to give it some thought.

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@Ian, thanks for the extra info on securing/rotating the camera. More money to be spent  :grin:

It sounds like a nightmare trying to align the camera with the tiny screws. I'll have to give it some thought.

I find it's perfectly fine during the day.  You just need a small flat-bladed jeweller's screwdriver.  Problems arise when framing is critical; even when I try to plan the correct position-angle to fit the target I am normally a bit (OK a lot) out and need to adjust; it's not impossible but it is hardly the kind of job to be done outside in the dark.  On the other hand, the 'all in one' nature of the adaptor means that you can be confident of a good connection and having the camera properly aligned to the focal plane.

Of course you could always replace the stock focuser with one that rotates itself, but that would be a lot more money that the Baader.

Bear in mind you don't need to buy everything at once. I started out with just the reducer and the DSLR adaptor, but once I added the LP filter I put up with several months of dodgy stars.  The camera rotation issue drove me over the edge so I shelled out for the FLO adaptor and Baader which fixed both issues in one go.

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I find it's perfectly fine during the day.  You just need a small flat-bladed jeweller's screwdriver.  Problems arise when framing is critical; even when I try to plan the correct position-angle to fit the target I am normally a bit (OK a lot) out and need to adjust; it's not impossible but it is hardly the kind of job to be done outside in the dark.  On the other hand, the 'all in one' nature of the adaptor means that you can be confident of a good connection and having the camera properly aligned to the focal plane.

Of course you could always replace the stock focuser with one that rotates itself, but that would be a lot more money that the Baader.

Bear in mind you don't need to buy everything at once. I started out with just the reducer and the DSLR adaptor, but once I added the LP filter I put up with several months of dodgy stars.  The camera rotation issue drove me over the edge so I shelled out for the FLO adaptor and Baader which fixed both issues in one go.

I agree. I'll just purchase the reducer and DSLR/M48 adapter first off. It'll make me appreciate the future upgrades even more.

@Everyone

Thanks for all your help. You gotta love this forum  :kiss:

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My mistake, the Best adapter is M48 to Canon directly so no T2 required (bottom right on fr/f2f page).

8ahyse5u.jpg

3y6e5a5y.jpg

Sent from my HTC One_M8 using Tapatalk

That a new use for a EP Key.....:)

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It's a drivers key for the railway :-)

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It's a drivers key for the railway :-)

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Commonly know as a EP Key....:)

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Hmm, not in these parts.. ;-)

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Electropheumatic Key, when they first had diesel engines in the sixties the key operated air valves ect, these days they properly  have a different type of  key all together (class 59's) started this trend, here is my key, i made  100 of these in brass they sold like hot cakes, 1 guy had 3 he kept leaving on the loco........

DSC_9645.jpg

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In informed that this is an EP key as well?

peraqa9y.jpg

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Quite likely, i gave pressing the start button in the earlier nineties not seen one of those before...

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