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M 31 Andromeda Galaxy, 41 hours and 27megapixel mosaic


Grinde
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This is just fantastic! I can't believe the amount of detail you have achieved in this. Simpley amazing. This was a HUGE undertaking that clearly shows the amount of time that you put into it. My jaw dropped when I saw the first 100% crops.

Btw why did you choose to do 180sec Lum over a longer exposure...or is that suppose to be 1800sec?

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The best   M31 I have EVER  seen!!!!!!!!  Stunningly impressive piece of work.

John

Thanks for your compliments John, I'm very happy you enjoyed my work :)

This is just fantastic! I can't believe the amount of detail you have achieved in this. Simpley amazing. This was a HUGE undertaking that clearly shows the amount of time that you put into it. My jaw dropped when I saw the first 100% crops.

Btw why did you choose to do 180sec Lum over a longer exposure...or is that suppose to be 1800sec?

Thanks!! It feels like I've been on a month-long expedition to Andromeda, exploring clusters & dustclouds through a panoramic window, (which is partly the truth as well) and I'm very happy I'm able to share this experience with the rest of you!

Regarding the 3minute subs (180s), That was my maximum exposure-length with the lum filter without overexposing the core of the galaxy, the fast focal-ratio of f/3.8 really speed things up, and since the background sky overpowered the readnoise-level I doubt anything would be gained by going for longer subs. And with my crappy seeing and lots of moving clouds, less data got wasted with the short subs and the stars less bloated and less burned out cores.

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Thanks!! It feels like I've been on a month-long expedition to Andromeda, exploring clusters & dustclouds through a panoramic window, (which is partly the truth as well) and I'm very happy I'm able to share this experience with the rest of you!

Regarding the 3minute subs (180s), That was my maximum exposure-length with the lum filter without overexposing the core of the galaxy, the fast focal-ratio of f/3.8 really speed things up, and since the background sky overpowered the readnoise-level I doubt anything would be gained by going for longer subs. And with my crappy seeing and lots of moving clouds, less data got wasted with the short subs and the stars less bloated and less burned out cores.

I forgot that the AG is at f/3.8...that explains a lot lol. Most people would do long exposures combined with short ones to control the core and just do layer masking in the processing to feather the core out. Is the main reason you didn't use this more common technique because of your clouds and seeing, which I completely understand why it would limit you, or is there another reason why?

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What a labour of love this really has to be viewed at the maximum resolution to really begin to appreciate the amount of work put into it. This is a real 'reference image' that people will be bench marking theirs to :)

I personally like the core to be near saturation as this then shows the large dynamic range of M31 giving it a bit of ' body' rather than it being a very flat image. It's possible to not use layered techniques and using HDR wavelet function to bring out the core as in my image below. Jonas 's fantastic high res image gave me chance to confirm some of the features that I have picked up close to the core.

post-1118-0-14149200-1398879487_thumb.jp

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You sir, are dedicated! Well done on a fantastic bit of work :) just when i was starting to think M31 images were getting boooring, but now i would love to do something similar someday. Love that second image of those blue star clouds! :grin:

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