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nickarp2000

my 1st RGB attempt of Jupiter

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Well, here goes.

Please be gentle.

ASI120MM coupled to C9.25, 2.5x Powermate on a recently belt modded and refurbished NEQ6 Pro (which I had given up all hope on until Graham at Astrotec got his skillfull hands on it)

Time approx 10.30 pm, 17th April 2014 in Northampton. Skies were clear, a slight breeze but steady conditiond, not much dew.

I relaise that now is not the best time for Jupiter but I have to keep trying.

Prerprocessed in Pipp, aprrox 1200 frames stacked through each filter is ASI2, waveletts in Registax 6, then combined in Gimp

I realise its not great but for my own experience it's another massive leap forward and gives me great hope and excitement for the future

Thanks for looking

Nick

post-32119-0-31972600-1398286534.jpg

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nice capture
you can remove the halo with a bit of tweaking with the histogram in Registax or other editor
makes it look a lot better

post-34443-0-29702800-1398288885.png

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Very good capture Nick, with lots of detail - and the GRS. It never seems to be facing us when I look lol.

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Thank you for removing the Halo

It only really became apparant when I uploaded it to the Lounge.

I hadn't noticed it before.

On the histogram then which slider did you tweak?

I am much happier with this now

Cheers

Nick

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Very good first attempt at RGB, I also recently change from OSC to (L)RGB and I know how much more difficult it can be at first.

James

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Thanks James,

It's certainly a learning curve, especially in GIMP processing.

I did do a luminence run but when I combined it to the RGB it seemed to wash everything out so I left it at RGB

Not sure how the (L)RGB works on planetary imaging as the objects are so bright.

I can understand it's use on deep field work where the extra luminence channel can bring out hidden detail lost in the filters.

The ASI120MM is certainly a marveloous camera. I notice that you have the ZWO filter set too. Do these incorporate an IR cut or do you need a seperate filter.

I currently have an old set of Meade DSI filters in my filter wheel but I have problems with the red filter as the IR + Red filter combined really dims the image, and although I could take the filter out to use the Red on its own I get concerned about camera orientation, focus and everything else that's took me the last 2 hours to get right.

Nick

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I notice that you have the ZWO filter set too. Do these incorporate an IR cut or do you need a seperate filter.

The ZWO filters are IR blocking (see the graph at http://www.zwoptical.com/Eng/Cameras/filters/index.asp).

I found that the L filter was not much help with Jupiter but it was for Mars! Also with Jupiter using the red image for luminance can bring out details in the image a lot, though it does then loose scientific value but gains aesthetics.

James

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Thank you for removing the Halo

It only really became apparant when I uploaded it to the Lounge.

I hadn't noticed it before.

On the histogram then which slider did you tweak?

I am much happier with this now

Cheers

Nick

I imported it to PS and set the black point to zero 

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Great capture and first lrgb Nick - only wish my own first attempts were of this quality. A very credible image this late in the opposition.

typed on my mobile with Tapatalk

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Thank you all.

Reference rotating it.

It's interesting isn't it that I see so many different images of Jupiter including those in published magazines that show the planet in all different aspects, and I semmingly get very confused with which way people prefer the image to be.

Thanks for advising and I will make a note in the future.

Just purchased the ZWO filter set and hopefully this may allow better transmission of available light to the sensor in future than using my old Meade CCD set

Nick

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Good point about the orientation. I'd guess that there are two 'right' ways of doing it: north (by convention) at the top or however it is seen from Earth at the time the image was taken. On the latter your is about right I think, whereas I tend to get the camera on the scope all wonky. :)

Edited by Knight of Clear Skies
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Definitely a good first attempt at mono planetary imaging :)

James

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Looking at it again closely it's a great picture. There is a small green fringe at upper right which could possibly be removed by tweaking the RGB align, but it's not far out. Like most planetary images moving back from the screen a couple of feet really brings it alive. (Very few pictures taken of anything look at their best in 1:1 resolution up close.)

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