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StarSapling

Binocular Galaxy Night

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Last night, I had my first relatively dark and transparent night in quite some time.  While wating for Mars to get up higher, I decided to see how many galaxies I could sweep up with my bins.  I used my 10x50's and 20x80's on a parallelagram mount.

With the 10x50's I observed M101, M51, M86, M84, M100, M104, M81 and M82. M81, M82 & M51 were easily seen, the rest were just detectable with averted vision.

With the 20x80's I observed all of the above plus nine more Virgo cluster galaxies, NGC 3077 and NGC 4236.  M101 revealed some hints of mottled detail across surface and M51 revealed some glimpses of spiral structure.

I was very impressed with the performance of my cheap ($46) 10x50's, especially since the conditions were not as good as they could be.  Having ones bins properly mounted greatly increases what one can observe with them.

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I've yet to have a really clear night to try out my new olympus bins properly.

Edited by hobsey

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glad you enjoyed your night, your post is a great advert for binocular users. thay are just so convenient, ready to use in seconds!

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I have seem to struggle with M101 even with the 15X70 celestrons, any advice ?

ta

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I have seem to struggle with M101 even with the 15X70 celestrons, any advice ?

ta

Like M33, M101 is a face on spiral, it is large with a low overall surface brightness.  Even from a good dark site, if the transparancy is less than good, M101 becomes very difficult to see, even through a telescope.

What works for me, with the 10x50's, is knowing M101's exact location.  I move this known position to a place in my field of view, where, I have learned from past experience, my "sweet spot" for averted vision is located.  If transparency is good, I'll catch glimpses of M101 as a circular patch of very faint mistiness. Sometimes, moving the bins just a tiny bit left and right helps in the detection of M101.

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What 20x80 bins do you use?

I have a pair of Zhumell 20x80 bins, and I have been extremely happy with them.  A few years back, I slightly damaged the coatings on them projecting the Sun, so I chose to replace them with a pair of Celestron 20x80's.  Even in their slightly damaged state, the Zhumell bins far out performed the Celestron bins.  Perhaps I was just real lucky with the Zhumell bins, because I have heard some horror stories from other observers regarding their expierences with Zhumell 20x80 bins - bad collimnation and such.

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I've been looking at getting the orion 20x80's as I'd heard a fair bit of bad review with collimation on the celestron and revelation I've looked, il have to check the zhummels out

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I've been looking at getting the orion 20x80's as I'd heard a fair bit of bad review with collimation on the celestron and revelation I've looked, il have to check the zhummels out

What has really put me off of Celestron bins is the statement they made in the manual that came with the 20x80's I purchased from them, regarding collimnation.  Basicly, they stated that, due to cost, they couldn't collimnate their binoculars!  What good are uncollimnated binoculars?  Also, their 20x80's have no means by which you can collimnate them yourself.  In all fairness, I must mention that the Zhumells also have no means by which you can collimnate the binoculars yourself, but apparantly they can afford to collimnate them at the factory, and they were less expensive than the Celestrons to boot.

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What 20x80 bins do you use?

I have a pair of 20x 80 Revelation bins and have been impressed with the views I have had of 

the moon and also the orion nebulae.

As for jupiter I have seen the four moons also very very faint indications of the bands, but still impressed with them.

As for collimation not looked into that, so anyone who has the same ones have you had any issue's with collimation 

and how did you do it , or did you send them away.

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I've looked at some reviews of the strathspey 20x90 £179.00 and they are very positive, think I might have finally chosen a pair lol

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M101 is my test object of choice now, it having been my nemesis for the first year of observing! I just couldn't consistently see it. :BangHead:  :cussing:  #

I love finding it easily now, and love the way it gives up its secrets to me the more I gawp at it... mwah mwah mwahhh  :evil1:  :evil6: 

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