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davefrance

Question for the experts - Pleiades

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Took a series of photos of Pleiades last night just before the moon obliterated most of the sky.

Quite like this first stack as it is how I would imagine you would see space from a space ship window. I know I might be completely wrong but I can dream. :undecided:

post-34685-0-98088100-1395156941_thumb.j

The second is the same stack but with a little play around with levels. The stars are blown out but the question is, Is that Nebula gases, which I know exist around this area, or am  just amplifying noise etc,?

post-34685-0-43259100-1395156940_thumb.j

Would value your opinion.

If it is gases I can work on improving when the moon is less of a hindrance. 

Cheers

Edited by davefrance
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theres a little bit of neblua in there :) the moon really does wash it out though.heres mine i took late last year on a moonless night  i think this was around 1.5hrs. can you give some details of equipment used

post-6284-0-51049400-1395157628_thumb.jp

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theres a little bit of neblua in there :) the moon really does wash it out though.heres mine i took late last year on a moonless night  i think this was around 1.5hrs. can you give some details of equipment used

Thanks for our response

Yes sure. Skywatcher Equinox ED80 with Nikon D3200 Prime focus

20 x 13 secs exposures @ ISO1600 stacked in Registax 6.

Not trying to emulate your fantastic shot, I know that I can't with the equipment I have, (it was bought on the basis that I also use it for terrestrial use) but I enjoy pushing boundaries to see what is possible.

Here is my pic of Orion Nebula also taken last night, again cannot compete with the CCD shots on here but for a second attempt I am pretty happy with it. (Same exposure and processing as above)

post-34685-0-76970200-1395158451_thumb.j

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that image took was with the equinox 80mm  and a unmodded dslr  ;)

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that image took was with the equinox 80mm  and a unmodded dslr  ;)

Yes

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not sure what processing software you are using but you need to make sure your histogram is inline it makes things alot easier and is a easy way to get your image looking right. all i have done here is aligned your histogram to show you how much of a difference it makes HTH

DAN

post-6284-0-46683600-1395159957.jpg

post-6284-0-92365600-1395159964.jpg

post-6284-0-96102200-1395159985_thumb.jp

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not sure what processing software you are using but you need to make sure your histogram is inline it makes things alot easier and is a easy way to get your image looking right. all i have done here is aligned your histogram to show you how much of a difference it makes HTH

DAN

Thanks for that, I will alter, I did realise it was a touch red but it was only a quick process last night.

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Hopefully this looks more like your version. Thanks again. I'll keep playing..................

post-34685-0-41807400-1395160852_thumb.j

Edited by davefrance
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Try longer subs. Much longer. There is an awful lot of faint nebulosity if you really get after it. This has about 20 hours, in a sensitive CCD and with subs of up to 15 minutes. It is harder than you think to blow the cores.

http://ollypenrice.smugmug.com/Other/Best-of-Les-Granges/i-Z8vdsft/0/X3/M45%20COMPOSITE3%20FL-X3.jpg

Olly

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Try longer subs. Much longer. There is an awful lot of faint nebulosity if you really get after it. This has about 20 hours, in a sensitive CCD and with subs of up to 15 minutes. It is harder than you think to blow the cores.

http://ollypenrice.smugmug.com/Other/Best-of-Les-Granges/i-Z8vdsft/0/X3/M45%20COMPOSITE3%20FL-X3.jpg

Olly

Fantastic image Olly, but wouldn't expect anything less. Thanks for the advice. Last night it was a race against time, moon was coming up quickly behind the trees so I just fired off a few quick frames. Mount was not accurately set up and 13 secs was max without stars distorting. Being new to this game I was interested to know whether that was nebulosity in the (badly :smiley: ) processed image or not. When the nights are dark again I will try harder.

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 Is that Nebula gases, 

I think so !

I have taken a bit of a liberty with your pic

but the areas of more and less suspected gas certainly match up with those in Daniels pic

suggesting that they are not artefacts,

so yes

go shoot down that moon :) and get stacking :)

post-16019-0-55215800-1395194707_thumb.j

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I think so !

I have taken a bit of a liberty with your pic

but the areas of more and less suspected gas certainly match up with those in Daniels pic

suggesting that they are not artefacts,

so yes

go shoot down that moon :) and get stacking :)

Yes, that's convincing.

Dave, IIRC you have a pretty dark site? Have you tried for the nebulosity visually? Its elusive and needs just the right kind of night, but it's possible.

Olly

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Yes, that's convincing.

Dave, IIRC you have a pretty dark site? Have you tried for the nebulosity visually? Its elusive and needs just the right kind of night, but it's possible.

Olly

On really good nights I find it easy. Really dark skies are a must however. My best views were from Austria at about 900m above sea level.

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Yes, that's convincing.

Dave, IIRC you have a pretty dark site? Have you tried for the nebulosity visually? Its elusive and needs just the right kind of night, but it's possible.

Olly

Hi Olly, yes you recall right, not sure whether we can compete with your skies but they are better than most.

I understand that at one time the "Triangle noir du Quercy" was believed to have the darkest skies in France but since then more sites have claimed this title.

I haven't tried looking visually, until recently it was that "fuzzy" bit up high in the sky. When the skies darken again I will certainly study it more closely. I will also spend more time setting up so that I can, hopefully) increase the length of sub and improve on the image.

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I think so !

I have taken a bit of a liberty with your pic

but the areas of more and less suspected gas certainly match up with those in Daniels pic

suggesting that they are not artefacts,

so yes

go shoot down that moon :) and get stacking :)

Hi thanks for doing that, it certainly looks promising.

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Yes it does,

It was especially that 'lump' next to Merope that convinced me it was more than just noise :)

I look forward to updates :)

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The nebulosity is surprisingly bright and you've definitely started to pick it up! M45 was also one of the first DSOs that I imaged, here was my result with 38x2m subs, unguided with and unmodified Nikon D70:

output3-proc3.jpg

Also, sorry, I just have to clear something up...

Not trying to emulate your fantastic shot, I know that I can't with the equipment I have,

I may be wrong, but I'm pretty sure Dan is saying that his equipment was the same!

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The nebulosity is surprisingly bright and you've definitely started to pick it up! M45 was also one of the first DSOs that I imaged, here was my result with 38x2m subs, unguided with and unmodified Nikon D70:

output3-proc3.jpg

Also, sorry, I just have to clear something up...

I may be wrong, but I'm pretty sure Dan is saying that his equipment was the same!

On reflection you could be right. I thought it was a question, but could have been a statement. So maybe there is hope for me :smiley:

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