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davefrance

Betelgeuse

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Was looking to do a wide field image of Betelgeuse etc last night - total failure, exposure too short, BUT looking through 20 shots I took in quick succession two stood out as different. Not sure why presumably light bouncing round the lens, but why only on two and a few frames apart? Not earth shattering but perhaps you knowledgeable lads and lasses can shed more light on it. (excuse the pun was unintentional)

These three pics are all much cropped versions of the originals, from an astronomical point of view rubbish, from an artistic point of view I quite like them especially when blown up even more, as become almost abstract.  :smiley:

18 frames like this

 post-34685-0-87439600-1394717786_thumb.j 

and 2 like this

post-34685-0-95683500-1394717821_thumb.j  post-34685-0-28862900-1394717835_thumb.j

Here is one of Sirius too, one of 20 all virtually the same. Again heavily cropped.

post-34685-0-56753300-1394717853_thumb.j

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I quite like them as well, especially the first wonky Betelgeuse. Probably caused by atmospheric turbulence I'd guess.

Apt description "wonky". But who took a bite out of the left hand side?

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I like oranges, but it wasn't me. I'd guess that's where the air is swirling, and the light has been diverted to either side. Take with a pinch of salt (my idea, not the orange), as my understanding of optics is a little basic.

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I like oranges, but it wasn't me. I'd guess that's where the air is swirling, and the light has been diverted to either side. Take with a pinch of salt (my idea, not the orange), as my understanding of optics is a little basic.

Youv'e been Tango'd :glasses1:

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If nothing else, the pictures really show the difference in the colours of the Red Giant Betelgeuse and Sirius. Maybe this should be called atmospheric lensing!

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If nothing else, the pictures really show the difference in the colours of the Red Giant Betelgeuse and Sirius. Maybe this should be called atmospheric lensing!

Hi, it's good t know I achieved something :smiley:

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I wonder if we will see Betelgeuse go bang in our lifetime.

Has it already gone bang? :eek:

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I wonder if we will see Betelgeuse go bang in our lifetime.

Perhaps !

I have a theory, are you sitting comfortably ? Then I shall begin  :

I was out with my daughter a little while ago and remarked how orange it was looking compared to in my youth.

In those days long ago my eyes were better and all the books, including Patrick himself, said about it being very orange. I thought they were exagerating greatly ! I didnt find it remarkable, just a pale use-your-imagination orange.

So I told her all that and her response was :

"Yes, I remember you showing me that when I was little and thinking that it wasnt all that remarkable", she had thought I was being overly enthusiastic about it.

Now, the point is, she agrees with me that it is very orange indeed !

So the question :- do red giants become much redder just before they go SN ?

And for daveinf, yep I agree with the others,

a specially lumpy bit of air passed by,

think mirages close to a hot road, the sun at sunset etc.

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Has it already gone bang? :eek:

Well I worded it a bit wrong.  Ofcourse I should have said: "I Wonder if Betelgeuse has already gone bang so we can observe the supernova in our Lifetime. :embarassed:  :lipsrsealed:

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Well I worded it a bit wrong.  Ofcourse I should have said: "I Wonder if Betelgeuse has already gone bang so we can observe the supernova in our Lifetime. :embarassed:  :lipsrsealed:

Easy to forget your looking at the past. I have to keep reminding myself.

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It's all relative :)

The bad news is that it is still there, normal, :) I just had a look, luverly sky I'm off out in a min.

Hmmm, I wonder ,

how much warning would we get ?

I mean, milliseconds from normal to ouch !?

or would it get a bit brighter over a few weeks/months before the big flash ?

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It's all relative :)

The bad news is that it is still there, normal, :) I just had a look, luverly sky I'm off out in a min.

Hmmm, I wonder ,

how much warning would we get ?

I mean, milliseconds from normal to ouch !?

or would it get a bit brighter over a few weeks/months before the big flash ?

I Think you mean.........it is still there, and the year is 1374 AD

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Great stuff, I like star pictures like these.  i will post some photos I did of Vega last year later when i am home.

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Supernova here we come.  Just calculated that it would be 560 million light years before we heard the bang!!!

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Supernova here we come.  Just calculated that it would be 560 million light years before we heard the bang!!!

pssst

check your units :)

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pssst

check your units :)

OK, OK, I realise that is a distance rather than measurement of time but how best to express it? Lets say it will take 874,837 times longer to hear the bang than the time it takes for us to see it. How about 560 million sound years? :smiley:

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yes ok,

errr but let me think a mo.

If it is 560 million light years away it takes the light 560million years to get here travelling at the speed of light,

the sound will only travel at

harrumpf, no it wont travel at anything,

in space no one can hear a red giant scream :) :)

Is this still an imaging topic ? Ought we to move somewhere else ?

Is it still in the hydrogen burning phase, in which case it will be a good million years + or - before it finishes the helium phase

But if it has already used all its hydrogen and is well into the helium phase then yes, we should keep a sharp eye on it for the next 1000y while it burns its carbon and then 3y give or take for the remainder of the leftover neon.

So I think we can delay the formation of the fan club for a wee while yet ?

Edited by Ptarmigan

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Ok Fan club delayed, let's call it a day........or should that be a light day?..........or a sound day..........?  Whatever, I agree to end the non imaging banter now. :smiley:

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Which of your scopes was this taken with

C11 i do believe....

Edited by Tinker1947

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