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allen g

TeleVue Planetary Filter

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I agree, but one problem with comparing with no filter is that you normally need to refocus so lose the instant comparison still

It's a funny business but when I've convinced myself that something is a little better with item X I can quite often see that "betterness"  when I look using alternative items Y and Z as well. You are then down to working out which item makes things a little easier to see or stand out just a little more. 

The other night, when I bagged all those galaxies, was great becuase I just decided to use a couple of TV plossls for the whole evening and be done with it. Having done quite a lot of comparing things it's nice to have a night off occasionally :smiley:

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I think actually we should all just crack on with observing under lovely clear skies, rather than playing with and swapping kit under the clouds [emoji20]

Having said that, it's clear out there now, but the forecast says it's cloudy so it must be cloudy.....

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I'm looking after the clouds tonight Stu - you go and observe something :grin:

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I'm just wondering - from everyone's very helpful descriptions of the Planetary in use, is 6" aperture maybe a bit too small to benefit from with it?

I have a feeling that this may be a suck it and see!

Thanks Scarp for the heads up on the AN review. I'll make sure to get a copy.

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I'm just wondering - from everyone's very helpful descriptions of the Planetary in use, is 6" aperture maybe a bit too small to benefit from with it?

I have a feeling that this may be a suck it and see!

Thanks Scarp for the heads up on the AN review. I'll make sure to get a copy.

Well, some so-called highly qualified people have said that 8" is a minimum aperture to benefit from narrowband filters. Others say that's bunk. I say: Try it before you buy it and try it on your own scope. Go find a local astronomy club and see what you can do to get a loaner - or bring your scope with you. I loan out gear to folks in need, and it's always come back in the same condition. But, of course, I've also got a loan out of an 12" LX200GPS - so I'm a rare bird! :grin: But it's loaned to a professor at a local university, so he can't run too far... :p

Now here's a question: I have an older Baader Moon and Skyflow Filter. It's from just before Baader played up it had neodymium in it. Does anyone know if it does and they just changed the label to cash-in on a trend/buzz-word? Or did they actually change the recipe? I scavenged their website in English and Deutsche, and they are mum on the subject.

Clear Skies,

Dave

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I don't think you can class the Televue Planetary filter as narrowband so it should in theory be useable in any sized scope. It passes enough light, probably abut less that a neodymium. I've not seen a frequency response graph for it though.

I did think it performed worse in terms of CA in my refractors, but there are a number of elements including the prism diagonal which may have contributed to that so more testing needed

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The TV planetary filter works well in all apertures, as Stu points out, I have has some of my best views of Jupiter in my 100mm frac.  I am still waiting to view Saturn when it becomes a night time object.

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Thank you Dave, Stu & Robin...I'll keep the Planetary on my wishlist then & hope for a retailer sale-price offer (doubtful, lol)!

Looking forward to reading that Astronomy Now review too...

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Couldn't find a review of the TV Planetary in March Astronomy Now - but it was only a quick shu-shu-shuffle-through in WH Smith. There was a bit on the Baader Planetarium APO filter, but...it's either a case of 'doctor, my eyes' or it ain't!

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As few guys asked before... can someone make a comparison between Baader Neodymium Moon&Skyglow and the TV Planetary on Jupiter/Saturn? (or evenmore, between them and the TV Mars - when watching Mars)

Thank you,

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As few guys asked before... can someone make a comparison between Baader Neodymium Moon&Skyglow and the TV Planetary on Jupiter/Saturn? (or evenmore, between them and the TV Mars - when watching Mars)

Thank you,

Will have a go next time I observe

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Stu,

As Baader seem to have come up with a name that Astronomik and Lumicon have not, what type of filter is it closest to, UHC LP or is it, like Python, something completely different.

Alan

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Hi Alan. I assume it is some form of broadband filter, more like a neodymium that a UHC, but probably with a narrower bandpass than the neo as it has a stronger effect.

Would be interesting to see a frequency response graph for it though

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The reading I've done on the TV Planetary filter suggests that it's similar to the Baader Neodymium / Moon & Skyglow but polished to a higher standard and having more coating layers on it. So it's more of a broadband filter than a narroband or line filter like the UHC's and O-III's.

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.. suggests that it's similar to the Baader Neodymium / Moon & Skyglow ...

There's one thing worth mentioning TV does NOT make 2" filters so for people like me who use only 2" filters...

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There's one thing worth mentioning TV does NOT make 2" filters so for people like me who use only 2" filters...

They do make 2" filters but those are the deep sky / line / narrowband ones. The planetary ones are just in the 1.25" format.

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They do make 2" filters but those are the deep sky / line / narrowband ones. The planetary ones are just in the 1.25" format.

Yes, I wouldn't want to fork out for a 2" planetary filter which would never get used in a 2" eyepiece

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I tried the Baader Neodymium and UHC-S last night: the seeing for Jupiter was poor at first then improved...so mindful of this thread I experimented...

The Neodym did not seem to offer much (to my surprise) but the UHC-S really seemed to pop the colour of the GRS, a vivid pinky orange, making it more noticeable, and the colours of the the main belts were emphasised ( brown/tan versus grey). Could be the improvement in seeing tho, but I did swap between UHC/no filter several times and the difference was there, to my eyes. I was sitting down rather than standing so that was also a help in noting more detail. There was a colour cast using the UHC but the increase in tones as above made that of little concern.

Using a single polariser as an ND helped with brightness, but the UHC-S stole the show. Or appeared to, lol...

Now I am *really* wondering what the TV Planetary may do for Old Jove! It's just the £££ that stops me rushing to a checkout...

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There's one thing worth mentioning TV does NOT make 2" filters so for people like me who use only 2" filters...

I have to admit I like the larger sizes but most of if not all of my planetary is done with 1.25 inch eyepieces. I believe the shortest 2 inch fitting only I have seen is the 17mm Ethos/Nagler. There are a number of dual purpose fittings 8mm Ethos, 12mm Nagler and 13mm Etrhos there are others too but all of them are design to take 1.25 filters, without buy extra screw on bits. I guess if you, like me , like to put the filter onto the diagonal it causes a problem. However when the 1.25 inch filter is 113 Pounds lord knows what a 2 inch would set you back.

I however have just ordered a 1.25 inch Astronomik H Beta only because it will be used on a Newtonian and with a 24mm Panoptic for the Horses head, a very expensive nebula!

Alan

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I've just been reading the review of the TV Planetary filter by Neil English in "Astronomy Now" magazine. He seems very enthusiastic about it's benefits in scopes with an aperture larger than about 5". 

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I've just been reading the review of the TV Planetary filter by Neil English in "Astronomy Now" magazine. He seems very enthusiastic about it's benefits in scopes with an aperture larger than about 5".

Interesting John. I'll have to grab a copy.

I'm sure seeing issues are what have affected my views with it

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I remember reading something posted some time back telling the reason for the fairly high cost of this filter was the very high reject rate from the glass, we all know how much attention TeleVue pay to QA and that for me is one of the things that keep them with the market leaders, people will pay for quality.

As for the magazine, if I went to the newagents shop here and asked for Astronomy Now I can't imagine what I would be offered.

Alan.

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Lat night I was able to get to a dark site. Initially conditions were mixed but became much clearer later. The seeing conditions though were mostly very good and so throughout  I would keep returning to Jupiter. Much later I put on the TV planetary filter and used x141 and x230. Immediately I found the image to be very satisfying, achieving remarkable detail, clarity and tone, the surface appeared to be very active last night with festoons and barges. Once again I also got that 3D impression. I later tried to increase the mag to x313, but the image not surprisingly became a little bloated. Only the third time I had really used this effectively, I now feel conclusively assured that this is a terrific asset to observing Jupiter. 

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